The “My Husband’s Sweaters” Re-fashioned Dress

I guess the name for this creation of mine is rather self-explanatory. I used two of my hubby’s unwanted, gi-normous size sweaters to make myself a new cozy sweater dress. The completion of this project is a personal achievement because I didn’t use a pattern, even though this posting is way overdue as it is a project made 3 years back from now. I just made everything up as I went along, knowing by now how patterns tend to go, and tried my dress on a million times in between in order to get things to fit right.100_1019-comp

THE FACTS:

FABRIC: Two of my husband’s outdated, out-of-shape 100% cotton pullover sweaters; one striped and one waffle/cross-hatched knit, but both had similar colors. The labels on the sweaters carried the name of a privately named “design group”, below which it said that they were “Made in the USA”.  See pictures lower down.

NOTIONS: none were bought, as I already had the thread and clear elastic that I needed.

PATTERN: none – a big fat zero!

THE INSIDES: The inner raw edges are merely together with a double stitched zig zag finish, same as for the seams themselves. This is not my preferred finish for the edges, for they still ravel constantly, but the sweater knit is so very thick, a zig zag finish is all my machine would nicely handle.

TIME TO COMPLETE: Over the course of a week, I worked off and on for an hour here, two hours there, and was finished on January 19, 2013.

TOTAL COST: Nothing!!!

FIRST WORN: to our town’s yearly “Auto Show” convention.

This project so nearly became a UFO at several intervals between starting from scratch and achieving a nicely finished dress. It was one of those things where I throw it in a huff, at my wit’s end, out of ideas, and disgusted with the garment as I saw it at the time. Only an interval of time would give me the time to cool down and come up with a new idea of how to make things better. Then the knitted beast would get brought back out from the spot where I “buried” it and get tweaked again. I’m normally a very patient seamstress, it’s just UFOs and re-fashions can be difficult and challenging…they’re like pioneering out on one’s own, not knowing how things will go and where they’ll end up. Nevertheless, that’s the fun and the pride of the whole thing, especially when it’s finished satisfactorily. It’s always going to be hard to make something lively and spiffy out of something very unexciting and unwanted – silver linings can be quite clouded.100_0928-combo-comp

The two sweaters matched so well together and I do love a challenge, so I took this project up. My skills have come a long way since making this sweater re-fashion, but I really don’t look down on this. I absolutely love the design I made and the fit is great. My only beef with this dress is the stitching I did, which is loose in several rows of zig-zag stitching, and the messy looking insides. However, every time I think of my dual reservations, I really can’t think of a way I could have done it better now, so I fault the fabric.

Really the fabric was highly resistant to being sewn on like a temperamental child. I tried several different needles – knit, woven, and heavy-duty – and none of them easily went through the knit. All the needles would land heavily on a strand of knit and not go through…augh! This is the major reason I couldn’t get a tighter stitching to work. The stitching is tight enough to keep it together but loose enough to still stretch with the knit. I did do something which I see on RTW garments – clear elastic sewn into the seams. Added into the shoulder and side seams, the elastic gives me peace of mind that my dress will keep some sort of decent shape, at least the shape I intended for it when I re-fashioned it. After all, if the two sweaters stretched out for my hubby before their re-fashion after years of washing and wearing, I expect this difficult sweater knit to possibly continue to give me the same trouble. Even if it does eventually get wonky on me it was great while it lasted for its second life.

Happily most all of the sweaters were used in my re-fashion. The main body of my dress came primarily from the one striped sweater, its torso being turned into my skirt and its sleeves (opened up and sewn together) going to my upper bodice. The neckline from the solid sweater
was re-used as my neckline, as well as the sleeves, granted that they were re-cut into a new shape, with the wrist cuff as the new “end” the my short sleeve. My dress’ waistband is actually the bottom band of the solid sweater, too. Wide strips from out the main body of the solid sweater were hemmed and gathered as best they could to form the bottom ruffle.  Darts were sewn in all across the waistline both in the bodice and skirt portions to smoothly shape this dress.

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Sorry for low picture quality here. It was a late night pic.

“How do I make some chunky drab sweaters look fashionable and appealing?” This was my dilemma at the outset. My original idea was something very similar to what my final dress is like, which was inspired by perusing internet images of patterns (especially Colette’s “Macaron”) and dresses involving two complimenting fabrics. It’s only when I started sewing that I strayed a bit and came full circle. As I was making the dress, I even had the wild idea to keep it strapless, or almost so with skinny straps, and use the solid sweater to make a little bolero waist-length cover-up, or at least a top to go over the dress. Though the idea sounded fun, this re-fashion was challenging enough and I didn’t want to try too hard on something complicated that might not work and end up wasting the fabric. So I stuck with something easy, one piece, and semi-predictable – like a dress. I’m happy I stuck with my gut instinct.

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I love the mix of textures and patterns and features to my re-fashioned sweater dress – cross-hatched knit, waffle knit, stripes, ruffles and such! The bottom ruffle was the last thing I added, but I love how it saves the dress from being what I thought was slightly boring otherwise, with just the right hint of fun girly flair. The ruffle also complete the color pattern – solid at the top, solid in the middle, solid at the bottom, albeit different forms of the same color at each spot. The waist being made from the sweater’s bottom band makes it a bit more supportive, and decorative, than if I would have used a section from the rest of the sweater. And just because I can, I kept the three button neckline closure on the striped sweater and placed it as a sort of ‘fly’ below the front waist of my dress’ skirt. I love to make my garment special and unique, but this one has a quirky personality.

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Trying out a monster motorcycle!

My “husband’s sweaters” dress is the perfect garment for just plain wearing of course, but more specifically, 1.) when I want to feel very warm and cozy, 2.) when at an occasion where I’m going in and out of stores, where it’s warm inside, between walking around for some distance outside, where it’s very cold. The second specific reason is the case at many “holiday walks” in December at some of the old sections of town or out-of-town. It was also the case for the car show – we had to park a long walk away, so I needed to be warm, but be comfy inside too. I am the type of person that detests the cold, especially bitter temperatures, and loves warm climates. That being said, I also cannot stand being overheated in some bulky winter clothes – I feel as will melt…in my mind if I’m going to be hot give me warm weather and a sundress! The short sleeves, loose knit, and cotton content makes this sweater dress perfect for me…one of the reasons I re-fashioned it!

Clothes can be utilitarian because they are a basic necessity – matter-of -fact truth. They also can be a work of art. They can be a morale booster. They can be a source of satisfying a desire to create or an enjoyable hobby. Yes, they can also be a bad tendency or a drain or an income, too. Either way, I think there is too much out there to buy on the cheap which is not really “you” and easily forgotten. Most RTW is of low quality, not doing good any way you look at them – whether for the workers that make them, the environment, and especially for the wearers. Sewing your own garments the way you want them and exactly for your body ends this current fast fashion habit, and helps minimize the vicious circle going on unheeded, and really does so much more good all around – particularly for YOU!

Do you re-fashion garments for yourself or do you find it something alien to not sew from scratch? How do you feel the most strongly about your sewing?

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2 thoughts on “The “My Husband’s Sweaters” Re-fashioned Dress

  1. Wow, that dress is really impressive! It’s very cute and it fits so well. I haven’t attempted any re-fashions yet, but I have a pile of “not-ready-to-donate-will-try-to-refashion” clothes that are waiting for me!

    I don’t have the necessary skills to do something like this right now! (And that was just confirmed by reading your post!)

    Like

    • Thank you for your lovely compliments! I never intended to have my post make re-fashioning seem hard…I was hoping the opposite! I’ll bet inspiration will strike you yet for your “to-re-fashion” items and then you’ll know just what do to with them.

      Like

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