Going Rockabilly in a Pair of Simple Denim Cut-Offs

After last week’s first episode of the television series “Sun Records”, I’m totally in the mood for the 50’s, especially the rockabilly style (what I see as combination of both early rock and roll crowd and the spirit of a rebellious but fun loving teenager).  Enjoy this while it’s here because you won’t see much rockabilly here on my blog.  Thus, here’s a quick post on some easy denim pants sewed using a popular Butterick ‘Gertie’ pattern.  This post of these jeans is my monthly submission to the March 2017 “Wardrobe Builder Project” at “Petite Passions”.

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Kind of like flappers and fringe of the 20’s, I personally don’t regard the Rockabilly branch of the 50’s as a mainstream part of the decade’s fashion although it has taken over much of modern “vintage” culture.  From what I have read, the rebels, pin-ups and the tough crew have had far more attention due to Hollywood, the ‘shocking’ factor of what they were showing off, and modern perceptions than the position they really held in everyday dressing of the 1950s.  However, it is an important, if small, niche in fashion that boldly shows how culture, music, and clothing styles go hand in hand throughout history.  To read more, visit this page at The Vintage Fashion Guild.

My pants are worn with a store bought tank and a thrift store belt and shoes.  A lovely ruffled authentic vintage 50’s blouse (given to me from a friend) completes my rockabilly look with its red plaid.  The flat heeled shoes mellow the outfit a bit, hopefully, but I did like sporting a bold pompadour roll with a ponytail!

THE FACTS:butterick-5895-cover

FABRIC:  100% cotton lightweight chambray denim

PATTERN:  Butterick #5895, a ‘Gertie” pattern from 2013

NOTIONS:  I bought the bias tape as I generally do not sew with red and therefore do not have much in my stash except for a few vintage packs.  The zipper, interfacing, and thread needed were on hand already.  

TIME TO COMPLETE:  If I hadn’t needed to do unpicking these jeans would have practically made themselves up!  These were made in about 5 hours on May 13, 2016.

dsc_0132a-compwTHE INSIDES:  So fun!!!  Every raw edge is individually bound in skinny bright red bias tape. 

TOTAL COST:  Under $10

These denims are simple because they are like a bare bones version of real jeans – closer to plain pants really.  No bootie cheek pockets, rivets, and contrast stitching here, my dear readers…and I like mine this way.  This makes them ultra-versatile enough to work with anything under the sun from modern to vintage of many eras (speaking of which I did wear them a layer under my 70’s shirt dress).  In the summer these are my favorite bottoms to my 50’s bra top.  Of course, this pattern is wide open ready for personalization, such as adding on one’s own pockets and details or even sewing this in a stretch rather than a woven!  I love the possibilities of this pattern and will definitely be using again…maybe with a fun colored denim next time for a really modern look!

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As basic as they are in style, they were just as quick to sew.  However, the real shocker to this pattern was the excellent fit.  This Gertie pattern is the first modern pattern for pants/trousers that I have found to have a truly vintage type of fit.  I didn’t do one single fit adjustment (besides my normal grading up for the hips) and they’re like they were made for me.  I found true-to-life bootie room, and a comfortable inseam, as well a good room for my power thighs.  This doesn’t hide the body, but fits the body in true rockabilly spirit where the women showed off their shape through a skimming fit (think of wiggle dresses) and peek-a-boo features of their clothes (like the tie off crop top included in the Gertie pants pattern).  I think Gertie’s pattern has the perfect balance of close fit combined with enough ease to be comfortable.

The high waist is much appreciated here but for some reason my waistband has the aggravating tendency to roll and wrinkle.  I used a stiffer interfacing but the waistband continually needs straightening out unless I’m wearing a belt.  And yet, a belt doesn’t work too well on its own because I don’t have carrier straps to keep it in place…at least not yet.

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As much as I love the pockets I do find a weird pull at the side seam corners of them.  The pants have such a snug fit I can’t really put anything bulky inside the pockets either, but there is enough room for a to-do list or a handkerchief.  Some of the weird pulling could be because of the zipper in the side seam.

The pattern originally called for (of all things) a zipper down the center back bootie seam.  I have seen this in a few vintage pants patterns, and I did put it in that way at first but found it just too weird, odd, and embarrassing.  This is why I buckled down to unpick (something I hate doing) so I could sew the zipper in the left side instead, like conventional pants.

dsc_0050a-compwWithout being rolled up higher, the original length of the pants’ hem is ankle skimming on me.  I like the cuffs better mostly because it shows off my fun bias binding and is more rockabilly, anyway.

Now, where’s my opportunity for a motorcycle ride?!  Can I ride with a young Elvis please?  Maybe, I’ll just have to settle with some good listening of some 50’s Memphis blues music or old time Patsy Kline country classics – always great, anytime.

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