You Can Spot a Dachshund Lover…

…by what they wear!  Weenie dogs are now in the popular spotlight more than ever.  Crusoe the Celebrity dachshund won the 2018 People’s Choice Award just the Sunday before, Lou Lou the mini dachshund has been featured by Ellen DeGeneres and Snoop Dog, and Harlso the Balancing Hound is getting big attention with his talent for using his head.  We even enjoy racing the little things!  Dachshunds are on greeting cards, home products, and every sort of wearable item from socks to bow ties.  Of course, this is nothing too surprising to me – I am a proud dachshund owner myself, just as my last three generations have been on my mother’s side!  It seems that I mostly get the wiener dog goods, so this time it is my husband’s turn to show his taste in dogs with a subtle vintage style made for him by me!

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  100% cotton shirting

PATTERN:  Advance #9414, year 1960

TIME TO COMPLETE:  This was sewn up in about 6 hours and finished on May 4, 2018

TOTAL COST:  $15 or less

The back envelope description is the weirdest summary of a design that I have yet to see.  It speaks about the shirt pattern in a titular first or third person voice, as if it were a real living thing.  “Shirt is especially good for the sports lover…” and “Shirt loves many fabric looks” are just disturbing and confusing sentences while totally laughable at the same time.  If the writers for Advance were trying to be cool, they fell so short.  It they were just being overly brief, well, it sure does make this pattern memorable!

Besides the text oddity, there isn’t much to say about this shirt except that the print and a good fit really make it pop.  I was lucky with this pattern – it has a perfect fit and proportions for my husband.  The sizing on men’s vintage shirt patterns tend to be generous in a size medium and up so I merely took out the given seam allowances to this design to end up with a slightly smaller fit, just right for him.

Even though there is no polyester or spandex in this shirting cotton from the local chain fabric store, it is really nice, with just a touch of sheen finish.  When it comes out of the wash, however, the shirt is a wrinkled mess yet a light steaming of the iron takes care of this easily.  This is the second time I have used this line of cotton shirting – the first was this Burda polka dot blouse for myself.  I may be hooked!

In order for him to feel like he is getting the star treatment with his handmade shirt, I finished off the inside with all French seams, even for the sleeve armscyes.  The hems and facing edges are covered in a pale yellow bias tape for a fun and clean finished contrast.  He always has to pick out his own buttons for everything I make for him, but this time I definitely swayed his decision into choosing some muted toned beige-brown swirled buttons, vintage items from the notions stash of his Grandmother.  They are still the basic four-holed shirt style buttons he likes, but I love how the colors match with the dachshund print to be noticeable but not be distracting.  Men’s clothes can have ‘matchy-matchy’ elements, too, right?

Speaking of matching, this print was a pain to line up.  The dachshunds are small enough that I didn’t bother the match up the sleeves and the side seams, but otherwise the rest was a bit of a challenge on only 1 ½ yards of material.  I am pretty happy with how my matching attempt turned out, especially across the back shoulder panel where I needed to line up the staggered alignment of the print.  Of course, with the little pleats in the main (lower) body of the shirt it only matches up across the middle of the back, but pleats are an infinitely better feature than gathering below the shoulder panel…one of the reasons I chose this pattern.  It has simple, clean, classic design lines that make it the best option for a print.  A solid would look really classy in this pattern, too, but I always associate the fun novelty prints as befitting for 50’s and 60’s menswear.

This was a really good birthday present to whip up for him, because he has been wearing this so much!  There seems to be just as much dachshund fabric to be found as everything else, and I do have a small stash of such prints so there will be a slow and steady flow of more wiener dog makes to come!

The silhouette of a dachshund is pretty silly, cute, and unmistakable all at the same time.  I’d like to think this may be one basic reason for the popularity of such prints, but many of our neighbors have dachshunds or dachshund mix breeds so they are a popular modern household pet, anyway.  Scottie dogs were all the rage in the 1930s with their images on feedsack prints, purses, and the like.  Models would pose walking a Scottie and they could be spotted in movies back then.  (A Scottie was chosen over Otto the dachshund in the famous movie “Wizard of Oz”!)  Their silhouette is every bit as unmistakable as a dachshund.  Eddie Bauer is known for their yellow or black Labrador prints. Elsewhere, other than a beagle print here and there, it is dachshunds that I see for every season’s product releases today!

Our own little dachshund!

Dachshunds were much belittled and stigmatized over their cultural association during the time between WWI and WWII.  They were stoned in streets.  One graphic WWI poster shows Uncle Sam’s hand choking to death a Dachshund wearing a Hun helmet and an Iron Cross because everything German was the enemy.  “Waldi” the dachshund helped bring back the public, universal acceptance of the breed by being the very first Olympic mascot at the 1972 Summer games in Munich.  The dachshund Waldi was designed to represent the attributes described as required for athletes — resistance, tenacity and agility.  These little loyal lapdogs could do without all the R-rated jokes on their account, though!

2 thoughts on “You Can Spot a Dachshund Lover…

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