Mystery Mail Order Split Skirt Jumpsuit

This is my attempt at a compromise between skirts and pants, technically ‘culottes’…with a vintage interpretation.  I’m not exactly sure if this is the best look on me, especially with the mid-length wide bottoms, but I love it despite such misgivings because it is so comfy, different, and a creative use of a border design (if I do say so myself).  This is by no means my first jumpsuit (see my others here and here), only my first faux-dress one!

My title alludes to the mystery vintage pattern I used to make my culottes jumpsuit.  It was one of those many mail order patterns of the modern mid-century, but what was particularly bothering me was I could not date the design.  I estimated that the design was early 60’s (or even late 50’s for a stretch) based on the hairstyle alone.  Then, I shared the pattern on Instagram, and someone apparently knew enough based on the pattern number to date this to circa 1962.  I still don’t know what company or newspaper this particular one came from, and if anyone can tip me off, please, do share!  For now, though at least I know what decade to understand this…but whatever past time it is from, I like my new and unusual jumpsuit!

This is my submission for the “Sew Together for Summer” challenge of 2019, co-hosted by the blogger at “Sew Sarah Smith” with the Instagrammers Suzy at “sewing_in_spain” and Monika at “rocco.sienna”.  This year’s theme is jumpsuits, dungarees, overalls, playsuits, and rompers…something one piece that has bifurcated bottoms.  This garment certainly falls in this category!  However, one is never enough of a good thing so this is just my first part for the challenge…part two will be a full 50’s playsuit, coming soon since the closing date is June 21!

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  a lightweight chambray cotton denim with a border embroidery stitched along the selvedge; facing in a lightweight plain cotton

PATTERN:  a Mail Order pattern no.1495, ca. 1962

NOTIONS:  I needed lots of thread and bias tape to finish the edges (chambray frays like crazy otherwise), with some interfacing and four waistband style hook-n-eyes

TIME TO COMPLETE:  This took me about 10 to 12 hours to make and was finished on May 18, 2019.

TOTAL COST:  just under $30

Whatever company this pattern was from, I am impressed.  For such a simple, unassuming line drawing and such a basic looking pattern (unprinted tissue, simple instruction sheet) it was sneakily complex.  The entire neckline and shoulder strap was one large and unusual shaped continuous piece that took copious amounts of pins, patience, and expertise to make correctly.  The pleating needed precise marking at the cutting out stage and lots of ironing afterwards.  Happily, I didn’t have to deal with much fitting issues – according to my tissue fit and preliminary measurements, this mystery mail order pattern ran one size smaller than what was listed, and I was correct.  Other than having to adjust this jumpsuit’s slightly long torso, it turned out pretty much perfect for me as it was straight out of the envelope.

Split skirts have interesting construction, especially when they are pleated like this one.  They also make for very large pattern pieces!  The deep pleats that meet at both the center front and back hide the crotch seam and make it look like a skirt.  I figured correctly that it made a better box pleat to sew the center fold-line together from the inside rather than just top-stitching the creases down next to one another, as the pattern instructed.  Depending on how much wear this jumpsuit sees, I might come back later and embroider on some “arrow heads”, the proper (and beautiful) way to stabilize the ending point of a pleat to prevent or stop a hole from forming in the fabric.

I normally hate box pleats in skirt backs because they rarely stay looking nice between sitting and everything life calls for, but a good hot steam of the iron keeps them pretty good.  The box pleating in the back was a lot more challenging than the front, needing much hand stitching, because of the center zipper running through the middle.  You are basically trying to have a fold line end right where the edge of the zipper teeth are!  I made sure to have a bit extra ease in the fit because if something like this fit snugly the back pleats over the zipper would not come together at all and only pull apart.

A border running above a hemline is rather conventional, so my favorite part of this jumpsuit is the way I have the embroidery border wrap around the neckline, too.  It really balances out all the interest at the hemline, in my opinion, and brings just enough attention to what might be lost otherwise – the fabulous strap design which is the closing method.  This jumpsuit has wrap-over-from-the-back straps, pretty much like overalls, that end as wide, cornered tab closings on the front of the bodice.

The pattern called for buttons to close the shoulder tabs, but they are the only thing holding up the 2 something yards of fabric in the skirt.  Thus I opted for two strong sliding hook-and-eyes to close each strap…but with the back zipper I really could have just sewn the front tabs down permanently and not had them workable.  Oh well!  It’s always way cooler to have the tab closings actually work, and at least I know what garment to raid if I ever need some last minute notions for another project.

The open, eyelet-style embroidered border presented several creative challenges.   First off, the dress’ neckline and straps needed a facing to complete the eyelet without making it obvious the openings in the embroidery designs were being filled in.  The only answer to that was to make the facing a similar weight plain white cotton, and interface it in likewise cotton interfacing, as well.  Secondly, after completely hand stitching the entire neckline and shoulder straps and tab closings, I was bracing myself to do more of that to the hem.  However, the hemming was easy once I just figured on following along with what was already there.  Then I was able to use a close zig-zag stitch (much like a loose button hole stitch) on my sewing machine and just follow along with the scalloping of the bottom to the border.  I’m tricky like that!  Hubby shook his head at me like I was cheating out of doing the hem right – but hey…I’ll save myself both time and bodily misery where I legitimately can.

Speaking of misery, in order to give my culotte jumpsuit a ‘test run’, I wore them over to frolic and play in my parents’ backyard (the backdrop for our pictures).  Yup, my new jumpsuit is certainly great for jungle gym climbing, puppy dog chasing, and general child level play!  However, my ‘test run’ (watch it here) sure caused me so much achy arms and tired legs for the next several days afterwards!  I suppose I need more play clothes like this if only to have a reason to exercise while having fun like I did that day.

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Modern Asymmetric Peplum Blouse

I told you a handful of posts ago, in the write-up on my second Easter outfit, that I have been weaning myself off of an obsession with peplums.  Of course, I am biased towards thinking that vintage fashion offers the best peplums, but I just couldn’t resist testing out a new Burda Style one that caught my eye.  Can never have enough of something good, I figured, but this peplum is not a fantastic as I had hoped yet it’s still an awesome casual me-made to reach for over the next several months.  Happily this multi-season (spring, summer, and fall) creation that is loose, comfy, and one of those wardrobe staples which is seeing more wear already than I’ve expected.

Burda really has been offering the best asymmetric patterns over the last several years, and I love such styles.  I enjoy the creativity of asymmetric styles, and generally find them complimentary, yet they are not a commonly seen ready-to-wear design.  Many sewists like me seem to muse that high production manufacturing and the cheap labor such companies employ (so, so sad) does not lend itself to asymmetric styles on account of the single cuts that are necessary and the extra thoughtfulness and care needed to make them.  This is where the benefits of personal sewing come in – you can make things you can’t buy (and make them better)!  Asymmetric styles still take more thought no matter where or how they are made but at least they can be made just the way you like them in your hands!

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  a 100% rayon challis

PATTERNS:  This top’s design is divided out into two almost identical patterns from March 2019 – Burda Style “Flounce Sleeve Blouse” #111, which has shorter sleeves and a longer hem, while Burda Style “Gathered Paneled Blouse” #112, which has quarter length sleeves and a shorter hem.

NOTIONS:  I used everything I had on hand – black thread, some interfacing scraps, elastic, a hook-n-eye, and one vintage button from hubby’s Grandma’s stash of notions

TIME TO COMPLETE:  This took me only 6 hours to make and was finished on May 9, 2019

TOTAL COST:  As this was half of the fabric ($30 in total cut), my top was only $15

Even though you’d never guess upon appearances, this is really a happy scrap busting project because it is also part two of a really fancy Burda dress I made last year – the Andrew Gn mermaid gown.  Half of the width was the butterfly print I used on the back of that dress…the other half of the width is this blouse now!  It was weird to have fabric leftover in this 29 inch width, and have 3 yards long of it, and the cute and predictable floral print was something rather “meh” for me, so I was excited to use it up on something interesting and experimental sooner than later.  I rather wanted to try a border print for this design like they show on #111, but my border fabrics are too precious to me for trying on something (like this post’s blouse) which I’m not positive from the outset that I’ll like.  There was a slight “border” to the fabric I used, after all – a bright green stripe was the printed division line where the butterfly print and the floral were separated.  I used that stripe as some sort of waist definition.

Ever since the Schiaparelli inspired summer set I made back in 2017, butterfly prints keep catching my eye and popping up in my sewing projects, but the previously posted Burda outfit was made back in 2015 so maybe my fascination with the delicate creature began earlier than I have been thinking.  Anyway, as one small segment of the other half to the fabric was still around, I couldn’t help but incorporate it in some small way!  The right side back that is all one piece (no separate waist seam) has a large butterfly over my booty.  Luckily the waistline was marked on the pattern, otherwise I would not have been able to line up the green stripe in the fabric to make such placement work!

More or less, if I had made this blouse exactly as the pattern directs, it would have been an overwhelming, uncontrolled tent of a top.  I’m not against loose and flowing styles, but I like some distinction to such a top with a whole lotta fabric and the busy floral hid the design lines all too well.  At least I had that green stripe where the peplum meets the waist.  The stripe ends where the peplum panel extends all the way up to the shoulder and gathers asymmetrically into the bodice.  The blouse’s print, as it turns out, goes with my pastel skinny jeans and a few pencil skirts so it’s a win, after all, especially as it pairs perfectly with my grandma’s necklace and earrings, too!

I couldn’t stand just leaving the top as it was, but I didn’t want a permanent solution.  So I had an elastic ‘string’ loop come out from being threaded through the right side seam.  It can bring the asymmetric peplum panel in to a controlled but stretchable and optional fitted look when I take the end of the elastic loop to close it on the matching, indistinguishable button at the end of the front stripe.  Poof!  One little add-on and suddenly I am so much happier with the top, its styling, and fit.  Yet, I can still wear it as it was intended.  No commitment tweaks to fix a ‘problem’ are awesome.  Hubby liked the top as it was, I wanted to change it – so I found a compromise and a great use for a random spare button!  It’s so nice to have to not install a zipper every now and then.

Otherwise than the tweaking the overwhelming peplum, the rest of the top had some slight fitting problems.  The sleeves, that I made basic short style, are slightly restrictive with reach room.  Even the shoulder line is a tad further in than it should be.  The neckline was chokingly close so I opened up by about an inch.  As I said, this was a quick, experimental make that is like a wearable muslin so I’m fine with such little deficiencies that I would never deal with in my regular sewing projects.  Just be warned if you want to try this for yourself to check it out on yourself carefully before cutting.

I did expose the back neckline opening more than directed to counteract the high, fully covered bodice.  The slit opening goes down about 8 ½ inches on my tops back, with a simple hook-n-eye to close the top edge.  I like a little oh-la-la view from the back, even if it’s just a little peek!

This might not be the best peplum I have made but I’m glad to have tried it.  Just when I think my peplum craze is satisfied…nope, something else catches my eye.  It will have to be a really good design to tempt me next…but my defenses for a peplum are still weak apparently, as well as for any asymmetric style.  At least I will have the best peplum collection ever if I keep this up!  I will be posting more of my peplums both here and on Instagram over the next few months.

“Minted Lime” Midi Flapper Dress

A modern Burda Style pattern has come through again to give me a great 1920’s style for everyday summer fun in the sun!  For some reason, this pattern company seems to have the best modern recreations of the flapper era (this bias cut beauty and this mock wrap dress are just two examples).  They are interesting designs that are practical and modern yet still so very similar to true vintage 1920s style.  I have not seen them popping up as much lately, but there are plenty yet to hit up over the years since I started sewing from Burda back in 2012.  So – let’s dive into a post about this oldie-but-goodie midi dress that I had made several years back but never remembered to post.

This is wonderful modern sundress has such a sneaky vintage twist.  An untrained eye could miss it.  The swirl-appropriate full gores on the side of the skirt makes this fun and easy to move in, contrasting to the straight overall lines which visually deceive the eye into hiding my hourglass figure.  Together with the longer length, here is a strong reference to late 20’s or early 30’s style that makes me feel so much taller and slimmer.  I can sense the carefree freedom and reckless spirit of the pre-Depression era wearing this!  However, better than a true vintage design, this one has pockets!!!

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  a cotton and rayon blend knit with a gold foil butterfly print

PATTERN:  Burda Style Burda Style “Midi Flapper Dress” #105A, from April 2015 (my ultimate favorite monthly pattern magazine issue ever!)

NOTIONS:  Nothing but thread and a bit of bias tape was needed – so simple!

TIME TO COMPLETE:  This came together pretty quickly – about 3 hours.  It was finished on May 19, 2015.

THE INSIDES:  cleanly bias bound

TOTAL COST:  This did cost a bit because it calls for several yards, but I bought this on a good discount when the now defunct Hancock Fabrics, so I’m guessing $25 or under.

This dress was an interesting mix of opposites.  It seems so simple looking at the design lines yet was still tricky to make.  It was also an unexpected fabric hog for just a few odd shaped pattern pieces, and with most of all the over 3 yards disproportionately below the hips.  As I was using a knit fabric there was no need for closures and using bias tape instead of any facings made this much simpler than it could have been.  I did not have any problems with the construction or instructions, though, and it finished just as pictured, so I am quite pleased.  There is just one caveat to my being fully happy with how this turned out.

According to the Burda size chart, it was not a tall size but it sure seemed to be proportioned for someone with a longer torso.  I noticed the low waistline (compared to my body) and didn’t really think too much of it because of the 1920s influence to the style.  I mean, ‘waistlines’ at hip length were the trend back then.  Only by the time it was sewn up, the hips were not as loose as I expected, and even though I still love to wear my dress no less, I wish I would’ve raised the waistline now.  The front pockets do seem to be at a very handy height, so I don’t know…maybe everything is where it’s supposed to be.  I didn’t bother to let out the side seams to give myself more room because I liked the perfect points I achieved where the gores come in at the sides, and the straight seams in the body of the dress have more points (and pockets) so get this dress right the first time.

I love a good challenge and all the points were enjoyable details for me, yet I could see these being a pain for other people.  Just remember, every point needs good stabilizing before sewing, especially in a knit.  The squared off corners at the bottom of the sleeveless armholes are my favorite.  My runner up is the tricky corner at the bottom of the front pockets where the godets come into the front panel with a pleat.  1920s fashion was all about expert and creative mathematics in design lines, and this modern Burda dress stays true to the Art Deco era.

This dress post continues the series I began 9 months ago in our early fall season, the “Indian Summer of the Sundress”.  In 2018, we had a warm summer that extended longer than normal so took it as a reason to binge on sundress sewing.  Since that first post in the series I have begun showing a sundress from almost every decade of the 20th century (30’s here, 50’s here, and 60’s inspired here).  This modern Burda dress fills in for the 1920s decade plenty well enough.  The 40’s and 70’s are yet to come!

Celebrating Memorial Day with a 1940s Recipe

Time for something a little different to remember and honor those who have given the ultimate sacrifice in the service of their country on this Memorial Day!  I will share yet another recipe from the “Modern Family Cookbook”, by Meta Given, that it had belonged to hubby’s Grandmother.  (More recipes at this post here, and also here.)  This book is from 1942, and seems from wear on the book, to have been quite useful to his Grandmother, whose husband was away in the Army during WWII. She no doubt found a simple but tasty treat like the recipe included for this post great for herself during those times!

I’ve made this recipe as a light lunch or a snack, and it was great – easy, interesting, and a great base for further fancy experimental flavors (but great as-is, too).  I want to try these cheese puff toasts as a sandwich, with tomatoes and pesto in between, for one example.  If you try this, I hope you enjoy it as I have!

Even though this holiday is about thoughtful respect for the fallen, let’s honor those who have fought and survived as well.  Please remember to thank a veteran today (or any day, really!) and never forget the freedoms of today are built from the courage and bravery of others.

Origami Neck Blouse

Just as you fold and manipulate flat, one-dimensional paper to create something magical and 3-D in the practice of origami, so too does the same thing happen with sewing.  You start with flat panels of fabric and fold, tack, and manipulate it into something that forms to envelope the body in the most fantastic way.

I know I’ve mentioned this opinion before, but this blouse’s post deserves to have it stated again – 1950s blouses really do have the most intriguing and unique details.  This top, with its mitered cornered collar that reminds me of origami folds, I saw as having a strong Japanese influence which I stressed by using a print for the placket which has bright and beautiful hand fans.  After all, it already had kimono-style sleeves (as they are called in fashion terms) and pleated bust darts which radiate from the neckline much like the “Rising Sun” flag.  All of that symbolism together into one scrap-busting project and now I have one lovely blouse that is both a wonderfully dressy-casual wardrobe addition as well as being an opportunity to learn more about another culture!

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  a solid burgundy red Kona cotton together with a fan printed quilting cotton

PATTERN:  Butterick #6567, from the Summer of 1953

NOTIONS:  All I needed was thread, some interfacing scraps, bias tape, and buttons (which were leftover from the buttons I used at the neckline of this movie inspired dress from the year before)

TIME TO COMPLETE:  The blouse only took maybe 4 or 5 hours to make, and was finished on May 14, 2017.

THE INSIDES:  all cleanly bias bound on the side seams with French seams for the shoulders

TOTAL COST:  Well, the solid Kona cotton was leftover from making this dress awhile back now, and the printed placket material was a discounted ½ yard remnant…so I can estimate that this blouse is under $5.  Pretty awesome!

As lovely as this turned out – if I do say so myself – what I am most proud of is the fact that this used up scraps.  Yes…a garment from seemingly worthless remnants can go towards something amazing and wearable!  I save pretty much everything that is leftover from all my projects, yet I do not count myself as a hoarder because I really do use that stuff up, as this proves so clearly!  The solid Kona was only about ¾ of a yard, and the placket was (as I said) a quilter’s fat quarter, but by turning the blouse pieces oppositely to mirror each other, and by piecing the placket strips together (you’d never guess, would you?) I made my idea work.  Blouses and tops with cut-on sleeves are so awesome for fitting in the smallest cuts of fabric.

Now, I can actually back myself up, historically speaking, with using the fan print for this 50’s blouse.  It was originally chosen to make both the most of a scrap and to explore understanding a culture other than mine.  (I have made a few Chinese inspired garments – here and here – so it was time to dive into Japan!)  However, I have found fan prints in some extant vintage 1950s garments, the best example being this dress sold on Etsy.  Interest in the Asian culture through fashion was extremely popular in the 1950s but unfortunately the decade was not differentiating between the nations nor appropriating appropriately.  Hopefully this blouse does a better job at that!

The collar area called for slow, exact sewing and my favorite, under-used technique…mitered corners! I was worried that between piecing the placket and interfacing it, the neckline would be too stiff compared to the soft Kona cotton but I think that is the point.  The stiff, stand-up collar is like a portrait frame for the face…I am fascinated with its unusualness and love the way the look of it changes at every manner it lays – open, buttoned, or folded back.  The envelope back description calls this collar style “…the newest cardigan look” “inspired (by) Paris”.  Hummm, I never heard of this, and sadly have not found any research info about it.  Neither does it exactly look like a sweater cardigan, and I do have a small collection of vintage 50’s ones to compare.  However, there is a more famous designer, or at least famous novelty blouse I should say, that does have the exact same collar with the mitered origami one of this post.  I’m talking about Hollywood designer Edith Head’s “Birds and the Bees” blouse offered through Dial brand soap in 1956.  This is 3 years after my blouse’s pattern date with no name listed for the collar style.  There is a new fashion terminology mystery here yet to explore and understand.

After it was finished, I was worried that my stash busting Japanese-inspired blouse would not match with anything.  However, I just need to wear bottoms with color – like my purple 40’s trousers (posted about here), my pink skinny pants (posted here), or a pink linen short A-line skirt (an old RTW item), or even some dark denims.  Usually I’m very conscious about my ideas for separates, making sure they actually are versatile and will pair with what I already have.  What’s the use of fulfilling an idea if it never is worn and enjoyed?  I disregarded thinking about that this time, and got lucky.

We took our pictures at our local Botanical Gardens’ Japanese Garden.  They have the most peaceful combed rock beds, and artful bonsai.  Bonsai, the artistic cultivation of small trees, is another one of the many wonderful traditions of Japan, but hand fans are much older to the culture.  Did you know that the folding fan was invented in Japan, with the earliest visual depiction date from the 6th century?  The Japanese believe that the top of the handle of the fan symbolizes the beginning of life and the ribs stand for the roads of life going out in all directions to bring good fortune and happiness.  Where would women’s history be without such a beautiful and practically useful invention!?

As the hand fan had eventually been universally adopted, many forget to think of the country of its origin.  The tradition of origami is so much more understood to be Japanese.  However, no matter what culture you are, it is still so universally enjoyed.  I think the art of paper folding is so special because it’s great to help people who don’t sew understand the art of creating with fabric and thread.  There is a form of fashion drafting that is called origami for a fantastic crossover, only it is one of the most challenging sewing imaginable (in my opinion).  Check out the origami sleeves on this Badgley Mischka dress!  However, it was Issey Miyake was one of the first designers to explore how origami could influence design.  The Spring 2009 collection by designer André Lima was also directly inspired by origami.  Art and garment design, form and functionality finds Zen through origami.