Summer Gingham and Straw

My first sewing for this year’s summer season is effortlessly simple.  It’s also basically everything associated with an old-time American summer picnic – gingham cotton, basket-like straw, bright red cherries, easy and comfortable dressing (no less cute, though), and good times in the backyard.

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I had to bring my pet dachshund into the picture for good measure!  He’s a loving little shadow to me, though he is camera shy.

Butterick 7161, yr. 1954THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  a 30 by 45 inch cut of an all-cotton, loosely-woven ‘homespun’

PATTERN:  Butterick 7161, year 1954 – it was a free gift from a kind Etsy seller.

NOTIONS:  I only needed thread, a bit of interfacing, some bias tape scraps, and 3 buttons – all of which I had on hand

TIME TO COMPLETE:  My blouse was whipped up in 2 hours one afternoon at the end of April 2017.

DSC_0417a-comp,wTHE INSIDES:  cleanly bias bound edges

TOTAL COST:  The fabric, my only expense, was bought at Wal-mart’s remnant area in their fabric department for only $2.23!

This blouse just makes me happy.  I love the styling – just enough ‘vintage’ touch to be neat and unique, yet still classic.  The colors are muted and cool, and pair well with so many different bottoms (skirts, pants, and shorts) in all colors (mostly khaki, denim, and black, but even red will do).  From a practical point of view, this was so cheap!  Yet, for how well it fits on me and nicely finished I made it, this is such a deal.  No wonder I buy fabric and sew for myself versus picking up ready-to-wear!DSC_0282a-comp,w

Making this top sleeveless was not precisely by choice, but I like it.  I was lucky enough to make a blouse from this as it was!  My blouse does look really good with sweaters, luckily, for when I’m stuck inside freezing air-conditioning or out in a chilly night.  I find it interesting how generous and comfortable the armscye is on a 1950s era sleeveless blouse.  The armholes from the next decade of the 60’s are so much tighter, and I’m always paring them down but it’s never good enough.  Maybe I’ll need to try sleeveless 50’s fashions more often.

The only major special detail to this blouse is the gathers which come from under the collar.  They are an ingenious way to both add an interesting design element and provide bust shaping.  I thought about pleating the excess fabric rather than gathering it (as I did), but I plan to use this pattern again and I can try that out then.

DSC_0283-comp,wHalfway through sewing this blouse, I had a scare.  I realized this ‘homespun’ cotton was quite fragile when I was stretching the blouse back neckline into the collar piece.  It tore way too easily into the seam allowance.  Thank goodness it didn’t tear any further into the blouse or I would have been devastated because this blouse is my new go-to, throw-it-on frequent favorite.  Once that rip happened, I was glad I had cut the as-is size of the pattern, which was technically too big for me.  I ended up leaving the blouse its generous size because I didn’t want another tear happening in the body of the fabric, which I could totally see happening just from being worn if it fit tighter.  The cotton is so soft, it kind of ‘droops’ down anyway and you can’t tell how generous it is on me.  Between the comfy fit and the loose homespun, it does make for an “I-don’t-feel-it-on” weightless summer blouse.DSC_0285-comp,w

A view of the back is rather basic but my vintage 50’s hat makes it amazing, if you ask me.  Look at that stunning weave of the two different kinds of straw!  The perfect condition and the steal of a price that I paid, makes this one of my prized vintage hats.  To complete the accessorizing details, my fun cherry fruit earrings are vintage from my dear Grandmother.

Blouses, especially 50’s era blouses are my newest ‘thing’ currently.  I’ve been whipping out several already with a few more in my projects queue to sew yet.  Thus, look for more separates to come here on the blog in next few months!

Going Rockabilly in a Pair of Simple Denim Cut-Offs

After last week’s first episode of the television series “Sun Records”, I’m totally in the mood for the 50’s, especially the rockabilly style (what I see as combination of both early rock and roll crowd and the spirit of a rebellious but fun loving teenager).  Enjoy this while it’s here because you won’t see much rockabilly here on my blog.  Thus, here’s a quick post on some easy denim pants sewed using a popular Butterick ‘Gertie’ pattern.  This post of these jeans is my monthly submission to the March 2017 “Wardrobe Builder Project” at “Petite Passions”.

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Kind of like flappers and fringe of the 20’s, I personally don’t regard the Rockabilly branch of the 50’s as a mainstream part of the decade’s fashion although it has taken over much of modern “vintage” culture.  From what I have read, the rebels, pin-ups and the tough crew have had far more attention due to Hollywood, the ‘shocking’ factor of what they were showing off, and modern perceptions than the position they really held in everyday dressing of the 1950s.  However, it is an important, if small, niche in fashion that boldly shows how culture, music, and clothing styles go hand in hand throughout history.  To read more, visit this page at The Vintage Fashion Guild.

My pants are worn with a store bought tank and a thrift store belt and shoes.  A lovely ruffled authentic vintage 50’s blouse (given to me from a friend) completes my rockabilly look with its red plaid.  The flat heeled shoes mellow the outfit a bit, hopefully, but I did like sporting a bold pompadour roll with a ponytail!

THE FACTS:butterick-5895-cover

FABRIC:  100% cotton lightweight chambray denim

PATTERN:  Butterick #5895, a ‘Gertie” pattern from 2013

NOTIONS:  I bought the bias tape as I generally do not sew with red and therefore do not have much in my stash except for a few vintage packs.  The zipper, interfacing, and thread needed were on hand already.  

TIME TO COMPLETE:  If I hadn’t needed to do unpicking these jeans would have practically made themselves up!  These were made in about 5 hours on May 13, 2016.

dsc_0132a-compwTHE INSIDES:  So fun!!!  Every raw edge is individually bound in skinny bright red bias tape. 

TOTAL COST:  Under $10

These denims are simple because they are like a bare bones version of real jeans – closer to plain pants really.  No bootie cheek pockets, rivets, and contrast stitching here, my dear readers…and I like mine this way.  This makes them ultra-versatile enough to work with anything under the sun from modern to vintage of many eras (speaking of which I did wear them a layer under my 70’s shirt dress).  In the summer these are my favorite bottoms to my 50’s bra top.  Of course, this pattern is wide open ready for personalization, such as adding on one’s own pockets and details or even sewing this in a stretch rather than a woven!  I love the possibilities of this pattern and will definitely be using again…maybe with a fun colored denim next time for a really modern look!

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As basic as they are in style, they were just as quick to sew.  However, the real shocker to this pattern was the excellent fit.  This Gertie pattern is the first modern pattern for pants/trousers that I have found to have a truly vintage type of fit.  I didn’t do one single fit adjustment (besides my normal grading up for the hips) and they’re like they were made for me.  I found true-to-life bootie room, and a comfortable inseam, as well a good room for my power thighs.  This doesn’t hide the body, but fits the body in true rockabilly spirit where the women showed off their shape through a skimming fit (think of wiggle dresses) and peek-a-boo features of their clothes (like the tie off crop top included in the Gertie pants pattern).  I think Gertie’s pattern has the perfect balance of close fit combined with enough ease to be comfortable.

The high waist is much appreciated here but for some reason my waistband has the aggravating tendency to roll and wrinkle.  I used a stiffer interfacing but the waistband continually needs straightening out unless I’m wearing a belt.  And yet, a belt doesn’t work too well on its own because I don’t have carrier straps to keep it in place…at least not yet.

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As much as I love the pockets I do find a weird pull at the side seam corners of them.  The pants have such a snug fit I can’t really put anything bulky inside the pockets either, but there is enough room for a to-do list or a handkerchief.  Some of the weird pulling could be because of the zipper in the side seam.

The pattern originally called for (of all things) a zipper down the center back bootie seam.  I have seen this in a few vintage pants patterns, and I did put it in that way at first but found it just too weird, odd, and embarrassing.  This is why I buckled down to unpick (something I hate doing) so I could sew the zipper in the left side instead, like conventional pants.

dsc_0050a-compwWithout being rolled up higher, the original length of the pants’ hem is ankle skimming on me.  I like the cuffs better mostly because it shows off my fun bias binding and is more rockabilly, anyway.

Now, where’s my opportunity for a motorcycle ride?!  Can I ride with a young Elvis please?  Maybe, I’ll just have to settle with some good listening of some 50’s Memphis blues music or old time Patsy Kline country classics – always great, anytime.

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“Something Old, Something New…”

Yeah, I know this phrase is cliché, and I do not have anything borrowed or blue to show either.  Nevertheless, this set of both tie-front crop top and shorts from the year 1959, made for Allie J’s “Tried and True” Challenge, is dually familiar and yet unexplored.  The fabrics are three “old reliable” favorites that I can never get enough of – cotton gabardine, fine linen, and rayon challis.  The “Tried” part is covered.  With the garments themselves being so simple in design and construction, there wasn’t much to go wrong for the “True” section.

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Yet, everything else – the date of the pattern, the style and type of clothing – is totally new.  This was an interesting set to make despite using my well-loved fabrics.  I went out on a limb to combine opposites (new and unfamiliar) for these two pieces and I can’t believe how much I’m enjoying wearing the results.

The craft of sewing never ceases to amaze and surprise me.  I wanted a challenge while still staying to something “Tried and True” and sewing, together with one of those always amazing vintage patterns, gave me just that.  However, more than this reason is the opportunity to like something I’ve never appreciated before.  Never had I been a pants wearing person…because I’d never found any that I liked yet fit me well…until I recently made my own.  Even more so, I’ve never been a shorts wearing person, but now one pair of well fitting, high-waisted, awesome vintage shorties has quickly converted me, despite my perennial dislike of my legs.  Sewing is definitely one of the best things you can do for clothing yourself, in my opinion.

THE FACTS:simplicity-2999-yr-1959

FABRIC:  The tied crop top has a front of printed rayon challis and a back of cotton gabardine.  The shorts are plain-woven 100% linen (so pardon the wrinkles), opaque and thick like a Holland linen.

PATTERN:  Simplicity #2999, year 1959

NOTIONS:  Only notions on hand were used here, which included a good amount of vintage.

TIME TO COMPLETE:  The top took me about 7 hours to make and was finished on August 27, 2016.  The shorts came next, and after only 4 hours they were done on September 10, 2016.

THE INSIDES:  All bias bound

TOTAL COST:  The linen for the shorts was a one yard “Red Tag” scrap piece on sale for only $4 at JoAnn’s Fabric store.  Since the gabardine is leftover from this 70’s tunic, and the printed rayon was used from scraps of a 50’s shirt I made for Hubby (yet to be posted) I’m counting both as free.

It’s kind of late in the season here to get much use from this set this year.  However, in the last month since it’s been made, I have grabbed this outfit out of my closet and worn it many times in many different combos, so the future is bright next year for these pieces.  Although I have the idea in the back of my head to turn this into a full playsuit by making a bra or swim top from the 60’s with a button-on skirt, what I currently have in my closet works to make a playsuit.  I even have a pair of turquoise 40’s pants (to be posted soon) that fit over the shorts and make for a WWII-era kind of set.  Two fabric or two color blouses are often seen in the 1940’s anyway, part of the whole “make-do-and-mend” practices.  Year 1959 is a great in between date for me so I can bend the style and make it have a flair of the 40’s, 50’s, 60’s, or just plain modern as I choose.

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For such a simple design, I had problems with making the blouse, mostly due to the silkiness of the rayon.  I didn’t interface anything except the collar so finishing the facing, keeping it in place, and doing the button holes was a challenge.  I didn’t want the tie to stick out like a poker, which would happen if the facing was interfaced, so I still can’t see how things could have been done differently.  I might come back and blind stitch the facing down by hand next year, but for now the top is good enough.  After all, I did have such small scraps to work with I had to cut the front with the trees going upside down, so – yes – it does have a fault (sorry I pointed it out) but is no less great to me.  My handmade dual stand necklace of polished agate rock also makes my outfit even better to me.

Whoo Hoo!  This top is too easy to dress into…only two measly buttons in the front and a tie front that shows off how the hem barely comes down to skim above the shorts.  I wasn’t originally planning on sewing up the shorts but I soon realized that high-waisted bottoms, whether skirts or pants and the like, are a must with the top.  Like I said earlier, I was up for the challenge of making and wearing something new.  I was actually going to use another pattern from in my stash, McCall’s 5263 also from ’59, but the silhouettes seem quite slender compared to my shorts.  I just stuck with the same pattern as was used for the top to sew a combo the way the design intended.

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Straight off, I am surprised at how short these bottoms are for 1959 and mine are a whole inch longer than the pattern calls for!  I didn’t know short shorts were a thing at that time.  Next, I am blown away at the perfect fit that required no fitting at all.  No kidding – this is like the third pattern from two decades for vintage bifurcated bottoms that fits straight off of the paper with no personal adjustments in the least.   Maybe it’s just my body type but after three tests (from 1940, 1943, and now 1959) I just think past printed patterns designed their crouches to be comfy, their bottoms for someone with a real booty, side seams for real women, and a smart amount of ease.

Finally, I am so impressed at one subtle detail to these shorts which makes all the difference – the back darts which come from the waist.  The waist has a double darts at each four quarter around, two at each side fronts and side backs, nothing unusual.  However, the back side double darts are in two different lengths.  The inner dart is longer shaping over the booty, while the outer dart is half the length of the other.  I think this shorter one shapes more of the hips, side seam, and the rest of the back.  I think this suits me wonderfully.  A very similar pattern, Vintage Vogue #9189, a reprint from 1960, is lacking the “smart darts” (so I call them) seen on my pattern…not meaning to be smug.  I’m just getting disillusioned by the modern reprints.

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Ah, and not to forget I have lovely pocket room in these shorts, too.  Granted, there’s only one on the right side for my dominant hand.  One is so much better than none though!

dsc_0345a-compIn the facts, I mentioned using vintage notions, but more than that they come from my Grandmother.  From the stash she has given me, there was this unusual golden yellow/orange bias tape matching the golden color in the printed rayon with just enough for the armholes.  It is glorious all cotton, too!  There are other colors of bias tape besides golden yellow on this set’s other seams, mainly turquoise and black…whatever worked.  However, I am most proud of the zipper.  Not only was the zipper a “Zephyr” dated to 1963 on the package, it is from Grandma as well as installed with a new-to-me and much improved method to stitch it into the shorts.  I usually save my stash of vintage zippers and use them sparingly but as the rest of the set had Grandma’s stash of notions, and the length and color was just what I needed, why not go all out?!

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My crop top and shorts epitomize to me the post war vacation wear, which for some reason this year means to me going to California.  No, we haven’t had a vacation this year, but, if we did, I would choose California.  That will not be this year, so instead I’ll have to settle with palm trees where I can find ‘em, with a top and some shorts that make me imagine I’m going to go somewhere other than where I am.

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