Picnic – Party of One

I don’t know about you, but I need to find time for myself more than ever in these crazy times.  A bit of self-care or at least a few moments of relation, or maybe even a little treat for oneself, is a respite necessary to get you through all the unending, demanding, crucial work that needs to be done.  A small, simple picnic – even if that means staying at home for it – can be just the remedy…especially when that includes a special adult drink!  I’m bringing the gingham and the linen cloth already with what I have on.

Looking to make the most out of small cuts of fabric floating around in my stash, I settled upon this fun 1980s era summer set.  Although this might look like just an interesting sun top with a basic pair of shorts, it is secretly more than that in intention.  It is a set that was a learning process for something bigger down the line…a sort of a training exercise on both how to do corsets and how to make something useful from even less than one yard of fabric.  I succeeded on both accounts here and ended up with a new summer outfit that I love unlike anything else currently in my closet!  What better reason to treat myself to a picnic, anyway?

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  TOP – a polyester poplin in a golden yellow ‘tangerine’ gingham print from here at “Stylish Fabrics” on Etsy, with the body fully lined in cotton muslin and the peplum lined in a white polyester remnant (as I do these other peplums here and here); SHORTS – a heavy weight khaki 100% linen

PATTERNS:  McCall’s #8067 (from my personal stash) from year 1982 for the top and Simplicity #1887 from year 2012 for the shorts

NOTIONS:  Lots of thread, heavy interfacing, elastic, eyelet set, zip ties, seam binding and bias tape, and finally long lacing cord

TIME TO COMPLETE:  The gingham corset top took me only 5 hours to make, but an hour to retrace and resize, and an extra 2 hours to set the eyelets.  The shorts took me 5 hours to make from start to finish.  Both were finished around June 24, 2020.

THE INSIDES:  The top is fully lined, so there are no raw edges to be seen.  The shorts have all vintage bias tape with bright peach rayon seam tape for the hem.

TOTAL COST:  The short’s linen has been in my stash for so long I am counting it as free.  The muslin scraps and the poly lining for the top were also paltry remnants floating around for too long, so they’re as good as free too.  The rummage sale notions were pennies.  My only real costs were some of the special notions, eyelets + washers from here ($8) and zip ties ($3), and the gingham which I bought 2 years ago for $5.50.  Altogether I spent about $18 for this outfit set.

As simple as these two little pieces might look, they needed special supplies so they were a bit stressful to work with and challenging to gather.  I am dangerously low on certain sizes of elastic, and interfacing, basic cotton, as well as elastic are very hard to come by today so I was counting on this project being worth using my special supplies.  I also went ahead and ordered special corset specific eyelets, enameled in white (then had to wait for them to arrive, ugh) and had my husband pick up specific zip ties from the hardware store (which he needed to visit anyway).  I believe the lacing cord I use for the front of my top came off of a piece of clothing from my son that no longer fits into.  True vintage rayon bindings and bias tape (which my son helped me find at a rummage sale) were also used because I wanted these to be special from my point of view when I get dressed, even though they might not appear so from the outside.  So there were a lot of supplies from a lot of different locations and sources which involved creative thinking, anticipating the mail, and everyone in my household helping towards the cause.  Who knew sewing could be a family effort?!

Now, just like polka dots, gingham is my least favorite print.  I will avoid it at all costs.  So what possessed me to try this?  I’m always up for trying new things in my sewing, my husband said that tangerine color would look good on me, and bold, obnoxious prints always strike me as appropriate to the 1980s, to list a few reasons why I went for such a cheap little fabric splurge.  I needed a little bit extra to get free shipping on everything else I wanted to order from Stylish Fabrics at that time, anyway.  The big, obvious geometry to the print gave me just what I like, too – a challenge to see how well I can do some pattern matching.  I’m weird in that way…other people avoid prints that require too much effort to match, but for myself, I say “Bring it on!”  Luckily, I didn’t have to try too hard because this little top pattern was pretty basic, and there wasn’t any reason to attempt match with the bias cut ruffled peplum.  Yet, just look at those side seams!  Yes, they are hard to find because I matched up the gingham pretty darn well, if I do say so myself.  For the first time, I am liking gingham!

In the future, I really want to finish some of the historical projects I have had plans for over the course of many years past.  Yet – as any costumer knows – you have to start from the inside foundations before you can create the lovely outer garments.  I have ordered a circa 1840s corset kit from the Past Patterns Company so I can complete the rest of the undergarments I already have and finish my dress that I started 15 plus years ago.  Thus, I figured this little summer top would be a good project to make me a bit more comfortable and acclimated to the idea of a making a corset.  I took cues from cosplayers who teach via social media how to make a comfortable, non-historical corset on a budget with items easily acquired.  Just like I have seen others do, I used zip ties in place of proper boning.  Then, I strategically placed layers of interfacing in place of an overall heavy material.  Specialty eyelets are the only notion I did not scrimp on.

I could just picture this little summer top being all wrinkled up across the body and puckering out along the laced front if I hadn’t decided to have given it lightweight corset structuring.  This was my idea, to be clear, and not part of the original pattern’s instructions.  Granted, I also know that a modern or even a cosplay corset is not quite the same as a historical one, and the eyelets and boning will certainly be more time consuming and precise on my 1840s one.  All the same, though, this little structured summer 80’s top help me wrap my head around a certain idea.  It is not at all uncomfortable to wear – rather it feels good to know it will keep its shape and look good no matter how I sweat, move, or sit.  It’s funny, though, how the complexity I took towards making it is disguised under the image of an easy summer sun top!

As my body portion was fully lined in cotton, I immediately eliminated the upper edge facings.  Instead, I lengthen the facing pieces to extend from the neckline down to the bust and cut them out of heavy interfacing which was ironed to the lining cotton.  The sides of the top got a lightweight interfacing strip, as well as shoulder straps and the front eyelet edge.  Where the eyelets were to be installed, the self-fabric facing was turned under so there are plenty of extra layers there for support without interfacing.  The eyelets were a pain to install, did not go in consistently (even with using a pricey setting machine), and the back washers do occasionally pop out (but pop back in again, thankfully).  I blame some of this on the channels of ‘boning’ (zip ties) which are on either side of the eyelets.  Nevertheless, the front turned out so well!  I was terrified I would make a mistake putting in the eyelets and completely ruin my project.  That didn’t happen (almost did, at one point) so anything wearable out of this experiment is a success.

The peplum was actually the real risky detail, in my opinion, because I was super skeptical of it from the beginning.  “Hey,” I thought, “I have worn several different peplums before and I don’t want this to be a belly top, so I will give it a go.”  You know what?  I still don’t know if I love it, but I don’t hate it.  The peplum is kinda cute.  It sure is different, I will give it that.   Yet, too many unusual and new things in one project might be too much for me to handle.  Maybe this is why my shorts pair so well with the top, the way they are pretty basic.

Sure, these shorts are a bit baggy, wrinkled, and a simple elastic waist – but, after all, they are super comfy, a delightfully soft linen, and easy to put on.  They are just what I need in my wardrobe, and something I find myself wearing again and again this summer, so they are a winning project even if they don’t appear as fashionable as I had imagined they might.  Even though this is not an 80’s pattern itself, it has all the marks of being one, and so I’m counting the whole set to be of the same general time frame as my top.

For the shorts, I chose the size which I normally go with for modern Simplicity patterns.  Although they have a good yet loose fit, I could have went down a size for a more body conscious shape.  In this design, there is a lot of booty room, which I normally need, yet this is almost too much.  I definitely want to use some rayon crinkled gauze to revisit this pattern again and make some pants, so I will keep my lesson in mind for next time!

I do love the front waistband detailing and the deep, generous pockets.  These are the saving features to this design.  The flat front waistband keeps the bulk of the elastic waist away from the tummy (much appreciated) and the deep pockets combined with the baggy fit let me stash my phone and all sorts of items…and no one will know the better!  Why is it I feel I have to sew shorts, pants, and skirts myself to actually have bottoms that have such practical and complimentary features?!  Why can’t RTW items take cues from what people might really need and offer amazing items such as this?  I am only glad it is so easy to whip together the handiest little items – like these shorts – that I find myself wondering how I did without before.

Even though I had only one yard of each fabric, I did not use the full yard of either.  Amazingly, I only used barely over ½ yard of each, but then again, you all know how extremely efficient I am at finding an economical pattern layout!  Thus, these two are true scrap busting patterns.  Anything close to a yard is often considered a remnant, but a half yard is an obvious true leftover.  I’m not yet sure what I will exactly do with the remnants from this outfit.  It so easy to burn through my scraps to make cute and useful face masks, but I really think I ultimately want to save these fabrics to go towards something more creative and unexpected.  We will see.

Hubby laid out his old great Aunt’s handmade quilt for the celebratory occasion of my first time in this set…and what could be more appropriate for a picnic?!  I am connected to a whole slew of makers through both sides of my family, both women and men who were not afraid to make a living at one point in their life by being equipped with a needle and thread.  I am proud and happy to carry on a part of that.  Just the same, knowing when to stop and recharge is equally important when you work for yourself, especially at home.  “Picnic – party of one, you’re place is ready!”  Yes, please.  I’ve got a sangria in hand, so I’m just fine.

Sweatin’ to the 80’s

My fascination with validating the 80’s is only just beginning after sewing my Givenchy Easter suit…and what better way to continue than with some fun and practical separates!

I absolutely love the feminine pinks to this outfit, the strategically straightforward details, and the casual chic aesthetic of it.  Each piece is comfortable and roomy yet well-designed enough to not be baggy.  Each has niceties enough to save them from being too practical yet they are so versatile and definitely made for easy living.  The top should work well dressed up, when paired with a skirt (thinking of this late 70’s one) in particular.  The shorts look good ‘fancied up’ as you see for this post but I want to also pair them with a tube top, tank, printed tee, or denim shirt for more casual options.

Does my new set scream 80’s to you?  I don’t think so, but that’s exactly what it is according to the patterns and even the fabric I used (for the shorts).  I even brought out my childhood hair scrunchies and ‘jelly’ shoes for a big time rewind.  I really do think the 80’s has more appealing styles to it than many people realize.  Let’s give it another chance – you just have to get past the stereotypes!  After all, I suppose we do need to welcome it into the sphere of “vintage” technically, now!

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  shorts – a semi-sheer cotton/poly border print vintage 70’/80’s fabric lined in a solid blue cotton broadcloth; blouse- a cotton/poly blend linen look fabric in a pinkish purple orchid color (leftover from making this suit set)

PATTERNS:  McCall’s Easy pattern #9525, year 1985 for the bottoms together with a Mail Order Printed Pattern no.9251, from the very late 70s or early 80s, for the blouse

NOTIONS NEEDED:  Lots of thread, some interfacing, a hook-n-eye for the waistband, and two covered buttons to make to match the top.  The side zipper for the shorts was leftover from taking out one of the two zippers I had put into these past-made 1940s shorts.

TIME TO COMPLETE:  The shorts came first and were finished on July 1 after about 10 to 12 hours, while the top took only 5 hours and was done on July 8 (both 2019)

THE INSIDES:  So clean, just the way I like them.  The shorts are fully lined for hidden seam allowances while the top has bias bound edges.

TOTAL COST:  The vintage fabric for the shorts was bought from Kirsten at “Verity Vintage Studio” through an Instagram de-stashing sale and cost me only $5 for the one yard.  The lining cotton for the shorts was about $6.  The material for the blouse was leftover from a past project (mentioned in the fabric section of ‘The Facts’) and before that had been in my stash too long to remember, so I’m counting it as free, along with the zipper.  My set only cost $11!

Pleated waist, roomy fit pants and shorts are back in force this 2019.  Whether those who influence and those who follow the trends know it or not, many current forms of this fad are just a rehash of the 40’s and – yes – the 80’s.  All you gotta do is compare design lines for proof.  (Check out the newest “French Poetry Patterns” Orion shorts or the Burda Style #107A “Pleated Bermuda Shorts” for two examples to sew!)

Many in the vintage making and/or wearing community have already been sporting the old style roomy trousers, but it is always nice to see a past style so many have been enjoying for years become mainstream, if only for a year.  The same applies to many modern summer crop tops and roomy pull-overs – they’re only sneaky vintage integrated into 2019 fashion.  Put both things together in 80’s style with my means of interpretation – and voila!  You have an outfit such as this!

With my newest 80’s outfit, I am mostly proud of yet another interesting and unexpected way to use a border print fabric along with what I think are my best scallops yet (despite the fact there are only two of them).  This is proudly a duo of one yard projects, as well!!  I am racking in all the good points I can here!  My wardrobe is sorely lacking in shorts anyway and a top that can both be casual or dressy is much appreciated.  I try not to get stuck in a rut with what I sew.  Making what I actually can use in my life and don’t yet have in my closet is always good to sew.  Doing so in a way that it is both a refresher amongst my sewing projects and also an opportunity for a new learning curve is a little creative niche that I love to find.

Now, let me start with the shorts.  I am not that big of a fan of pleated waist bifurcated bottoms admittedly, but hey – these looked really cute on the pattern and I figured the border print being vertical would help.  Only one selvedge edge having the border and only one yard at my disposal made me have to choose sides for the geometric, mock-embroidery print.  The back is plain and the front has both borders.  I had to fold the fabric in an unusual fashion for this to work out.  Most fabrics are folded selvedge to selvedge, the width in half (this is how I buy them off of a cardboard bolt in my local stores).  The shorts’ fabric had to be folded oppositely so my preferred border layout could work.  Even though this fabric was sheer, it was really a tight woven so if was going against the grainline it wouldn’t have mattered.  Luckily, it lined up anyways.

The pattern called for an elastic gathered back half of the waist, but really…that would be too obviously 80’s and is not my ‘cup of tea’.  So I catered the shorts to have a flat waist all around with darts above the booty, and a side zipper.  Of course, the full lining was also not part of the pattern and my idea, as well.  The fabric was super sheer…so I went with an opaque royal blue lining as it was a color already in the print, so lovely as a contrast, and definitely opaque.  Full lining sure makes for a smooth feel inside and deluxe look, though!  Finally, I left out the in seam pockets.  As sad as I am to not have pockets, I didn’t want them to puff out the pleated front more than necessary.  I just might come back to these shorts at a future date and add in a back welt pocket or two.  We’ll see!

My top – or is it really a blouse? – was just as easy to sew as the shorts.  Only a handful of hours to commit at a time is the most I’m really capable of this busy summer anyway, and that is all I needed to whip this sweet little number together.  I made this even easier by not having truly workable button closings at the neck.  It isn’t constricting to the dressing situation just to keep those lovely fabric covered buttons just for looking pretty and perfect, so I’m all in for a little sewing cheat.

The line drawing lies about the smart simplicity of its design and true finished shape.  The bust dart shaping on the left side is sneakily hidden within the seam which leads to the neckline detail – very nice touch – and the back shoulders have some darts that only appear on the pattern pieces themselves.  Also, as you can see, my top turned out so much boxier than the drawing would make you think.  At the same time, however, I am not at all surprised because this is a pullover top.  No zipper, no closures with a woven material means it has to be a slightly generous fit, right?  Overall, I think the actual garment is much nicer than the line drawing, but disappointingly not the same.  At least it’s better to have good surprises in store with a sewing pattern than be let down at the end of working with it, I suppose.

Never mind the difference, I freaking love this blouse anyway.  It ends up appearing so very 1950s to me.  I think it is the kimono seamed, cut-on sleeves and the feminine detailing.  This is only one of a handful of recent instances where I have seen the 80’s refresh a 1950s look, and the fact is insanely curious to me.  The 1980’s is well known for more exaggerated versions of WWII 40’s fashions.  If my shorts were long length they very well would look 40’s, much like these “Marlene” trousers I’ve made, no doubt.  Yet, the closer you look for variety in 80’s women’s clothing, you can see the occasional 1890s look (quaint puff sleeve dresses with full skirts, such as Princess Diana’s 1981 wedding) or the 1920’s drop-waisted flapper style dress and even some draped, soft 30’s inspired garments.  Yes, I’ll admit there are some just plain terrible ideas, too, that I can’t imagine looking good on any body type.  Check out my Pinterest board on the “Power 80’s” to see more inspiration.  However, it all makes me think that perhaps the 1980s was a decade that offered more options of dressing than we realize, rehashing all sorts of things from the 90 years before so that maybe the only think that quintessentially sticks to label it are the worst experiments (neon bomber jackets, “Hammer” pants, etc.).

Whatever – I love this post’s outfit combo.  It might not be the most body complimentary outfit but each are comfortable and useful handmades that are a successful experiment of a foray into a newly vintage decade.  I find my happy sewing place in the most unexpected ways sometimes!