Simple Luxury: a Vintage Hair Curling Tutorial

Yay!  I’ve reached 200 posts here on my blog!

To celebrate I will offer you something that is definitely different.  Here’s my very first hair tutorial to show you one of my very favorite way of achieving a curly hair style.  This method of pinning or setting my hair for curls was shown to me through my good friend, 'Pickwick Papers' curl-paper illustration-compwho is a hair stylist, by her salon’s owner, Cecil.  Apparently, it is the real-deal old-fashioned way that they used to do it before we women had metal, foam, plastic, wire, and electric devices to resort to for a hairstyle we wanted…ladies resorted to paper and fabric!  I have no idea when “rag rolls” and “curl-papers” originated in history, but my first introduction to this type of pinning up one’s hair was in high school when I read Charles Dickens’ “Oliver Twist”.  There are several references to “curl-papers” in both Nancy’s and other ladies’ hair throughout the book, with the most prominent citations in Chapter 13 (find it yourself here).  Just think – this book was from circa 1840!

It might be the best looking way to set curls (hubby thinks I look rather funny in it), but it is natural, easy on the hair and head, and requires only very simple and readily available supplies.  Little or no money is needed to try it out…only a little time.

This is the final part, number 3, to my post series on easy and simple ways to stay comfy, cozy, and effortless but authentically vintage when it’s time to unwind.  Post number 1 is a 3 hour, bias-cut nightgown and post number two is a fleece, very coat-like housecoat.  The pictures below show my finished style after using my hair curling method. Enjoy the following tutorial!

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This might sound weird to start off with, but I will demonstrate how to make your own “curlers” using something menial but soft and readily available – toilet tissue paper.  This is how Cecil first showed me.  In “Oliver Twist” and Jane Austen times, women used paper – and you still can try this with strips cut from a lunch bag or such if you’d like.  In addition to toilet paper, you can even use paper towels.  I also have “curlers” made from real rag portions or scrap fabrics, the reason this kind of set is often known as “rag rolls”.  However, learning to use toilet tissue paper means wherever you go, you’ll never lack the necessary tools for lovely curls…just sayin’!  Later on you’ll see my curlers made from velvet leftover from this blouse, but just basic cotton is actually the best material, in my opinion, for rag rolls.  You don’t want to use any material silky or slippery in feel.  You want a fabric that will somewhat “stick” to itself.  Here’s your fabric scrap pile’s big opportunity to become useful!

Best perk ever – this set is the most comfortable to sleep through the night in that I have found yet!  This is due to the fact my method of rag rolls is not just wrapping hair around a strip of fabric and tying a knot.  Who wants to sleep on that?!  My rag roll method is all about making the perfect “curler” that eliminates any knotting, tying, or any little bird’s-nest of hair to sleep on overnight.

First off, you need to start with a rectangle that is about 4 inches by 12 inches (or 3 squares of toilet tissue paper to be exact).  You can make your rag rolls longer (maybe 15 inches) if you want them to be a bit easier to work with and you can also make them wider (maybe 5 or 6 inches) if you want thicker “curlers”, but I would not recommend going smaller with the proportions.

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You are going to take this rectangle and fold it first in half towards you, long wise (step #1 & #2), and then in half again (step #3).  In other words, the rectangle is being folded into fourths along the length.

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This done, you hold both ends and twist only 3 times.  A semi-twisted rectangle piece, not a tightly wound ‘rope’, is the ideal.  A few twists of the wrist while holding each end is all it takes.  Now, put your finger into the middle and fold the whole piece in half, keeping it twisted.  Voila!  You have your curler!  You can do this as you go to see how many you’ll need or you can do about a dozen and work with that.

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Now, I usually only do my rag rolls when my hair is completely dry or partially dry.  Starting off with wet hair would only soak the rag scrap and prevent your hair from ever drying (unless you sit under a hood hair dryer for a long, long time).  Wet hair with toilet paper “curlers” seems like the formula for a gunky mess, so make sure your hair is dry for this option.  My hair is naturally curly so maybe starting off with hair completely dry will not work for everyone without adding on some sort of setting lotion or the like…I don’t know, I’m not you!  You’ll just have to try and experiment to see what works best for you.

The same thing goes for the portions of hair you want to use – you’ll have to experiment.  I usually grab a portion about 2 inches square from the scalp and always curl under (unless I want a 60’s ‘flipped end’ style).  Now’s the time for some rapid fire quick tips.  Smaller portions make tighter curls, larger portions make looser curls. You can also twist your portions of hair like you did for the rag “curlers” – this helps the hair stay in place but also makes for a loose, wavy sort of curl.  Rolling in with the hair at a 90 angle or more from the scalp creates volume, versus rolling in at a 45 degree angle which creates a curly style that lays closer to the head.  Rolling in all the way to the scalp creates more, tighter curls while rolling only half way up to you scalp leaves a flat crown with curly ends.  There are so many possibilities for changing it up for a different look!DSC_0348-comp,w

I like to make the front side portion as tighter, smaller portion curls rolled in a vertical angle.  The same goes for the bottom back hair along the nape of my neck.  These two spots come un-curled easily over the course of a day and I like tighter curls falling down one side of my face. My hair is cut in long layers, with the front angled down so curling this way pairs up well with my haircut.

Once you have a hair portion, hold the end of your hair because you’ll start curling there.  Find the middle of the rag “curler” (still keeping it twisted and looped in half) and put your other finger over it.  Roll the end tips of your hair twice over both the “curler” and your finger. Then pull your finger out and keep rolling in from there.  Having your finger over the rag roll at the beginning of the curl keeps the tips of your hair from being kinked or rolled way too tight.  Otherwise you’ll end up with a finished curl that has an end which is very frizzy and terribly ugly (called “cow licked”).  Believe me, I tried a set without my finger there at the end just to see what it would do and won’t do it again!

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Once you’ve rolled up as far as you want to go, take your two “pinchy fingers”, thumb and index finger, and peek them out through the loop at one end of the rag “curler”.  Grab the two “tails” at the other end of the rag “curler” and either stuff or pull them through the loop.

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It takes practice to get the loops just right because if they are too big they won’t hold the curl or tails.  If the loop is too small, well…it won’t work at all either, especially if you’re using toilet paper (it breaks and you have to start over).  Again, this step takes a bit of practice.100_6439-comp,w

With all curls looped closed and hair pinned up, I’m ready for bed!

After a night of sleeping sometimes a few curls do come undone.  However, they almost always survive intact well enough to do their job.  All taken out, below at left is what my rag rolls look like un-combed.  After a thorough brushing with a bristle brush, this (below right) is my finished hairstyle.  The curls do relax a bit over the course of the day, more so with extra brushings, but generally last me for two days.  Of course, as my hair is naturally curly, it probably takes to the set better than others might find.

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This hair set works for many decades depending on how you use it.  A loose set is something I can use for the 40’s and especially 50’s, while a tight set I use for both the 30’s and the 80’s.  Look what fabric can do for your hair!

Please do let me know if you try this and how it works for you.  It took me several times of experimental sets before I felt like I had it down and was doing it decently enough.  Please do ask me if you have a question – whether it’s something you need clarified or whatever!

P.S. I will have a “short and sweet” version of this hair curling tutorial on my Instagram, just done with velvet rag “curlers” rather than the toilet paper used in this post.  Also, in case you were wondering, the printed tee I am wearing in some of my pictures is my newest Agent Carter acquisition…to see the whole thing, go on my Instagram post here and figure out the meaning to it!

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What I’m Watching Tonight…

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I might not have Marvel’s Agent Carter Season 3 to watch, but I am sort of pumped about the CMT (Country Music Television) series special “Sun Records” premiering tonight.  The actor Chad Michael Murray, better known as “Agent Jack Thompson” from Agent Carter, dons some spiffy vintage duds and snazzy ties again to be in the 1950s telling the story of Sam Phillips, founder of Sun Records…the iconic Memphis label that introduced Elvis, Johnny Cash, and those who began rock n’ roll.  Some of the previews I have seen seem steamier than the other previews that focus on the music, and I have no idea how decent or authentic it might be.  I have low expectations, if nothing else I am excited to see Chad Michael Murray again on the screen, especially in vintage.  Will you watch this at all?

Extending a Thank You…

A big thank you goes to Linda of “Nice dress! Thanks, I made it!!” for sharing her own award and nominating me for the “Blogger Recognition Award”.  I have the best friends over the internet, as well as the best readers ever!  Thank you also, for reading and enjoying my postings, as well as every comment – they always make my day!

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So to follow the guidelines, I will first *try* to make a short summary of why I started blogging.  There is so much more I’d like to say!  I began back in September 2012, originally blogging along for about 5 months to follow along the then popular and amazing “Sew Weekly”.  My new found “discovery” of vintage patterns a year before also started something big in my life.  However, as what was begun by “Sew Weekly” unfortunately was not continued, and the community platform there was becoming a ghost town, I was encouraged by both my hubby and computer-tech brother-in-law to start my own space for creativity.  “Seam Racer” is the nickname appropriated to be by my hubby – I wiz fast (but still precisely) through the seams of my sewing as fast as I’d like to drive my hot red vintage 80’s car.  My title’s related to the dated kids cartoon “Speed Racer” (so fun, btw) taken from a stitcher’s point of view – let me sit down at a sewing machine or a 6-speed, two door race car and I’m happy and ready to be off!

Soon, my blogging became more than just a place to share what I had made and produced, it became my outlet for so much as well as a place to find others, keep in touch with the world, and learn so much.  Also, this is my way to continually polish and exercise my love for writing and expressing myself, and (hopefully) convey to readers things I am passionate about and share the knowledge I have and the way I see things.  My blog is a satisfying commitment that has become one of the best parts to my life.

By way of advice to new bloggers, my first word is to not be overwhelmed by the immensity of what is out there.  The complexity of the internet with the decision of what blogging platform and such to choose was too much for me at first, and rather stressful.  Take your time to learn, don’t get frustrated by mistakes – stressing out over it isn’t worth it.  Find forums to help you learn how the site works and enjoy what you are sharing on the internet just as much as you enjoy it off of the internet.

Second, pictures are an important part of sharing and explaining on a blog, so another way to avoid frustration and add enjoyment is to invest in a good camera or at least one that you feel works well for you.  About a year ago, we acquired a very nice camera with many bells and whistles on it and now photo shoots take less time and we are no longer limited to where and when, night and day as much.  Interestingly enough, I feel that the very fact of the motivation of styling myself for a picture and posing for them adds so much more to my own happiness in my project and gets me seeing how the outfit works.

Now, for my 15 nominees:

Please go and visit these nominees of mine.  If those I’ve named choose to participate, the rules for receiving this award are as follows:

  • Thank the blogger who nominated you and provide a link to their blog.
  • Write a post to show your award.
  • Give a brief story of how your blog started.
  • Give two pieces of advice to new bloggers.
  • Select 15 other bloggers you want to give this award to.

Keep up all the awesome blogging everyone, and I hope to continue to offer a little something for everyone here on my spot on the internet.

Hey! I’m featured over on “PopWrapped” for my “Agent Carter”fashion

In honor of the final episode of the Marvel television series “Agent Carter”, the site “PopWrapped” gave the show and it’s staunch followers some of the parting fanfare it so well deserves, called “Agent Carter’s Closet: The Fans And The Power Of Peggy Carter”.  I was happily featured on the “Fan Tribute” as well as over 40 others.  I’m tickled!  Go see the page for yourself here (follow this link) and be prepared to be amazed by the stories and the people.

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Peggy and her friends on the show have inspired others to sew, to find themselves in vintage fashion, to feel empathy with the characters to help them in their real lives, or even to find a way to stand tall.  Here some extra pictures from our photo shoot of my classic Peggy blue suit set.

DSC_0037a-compDSC_0044a-compHere I’m wearing my 1944 “Hollywood” scalloped blouse, an old store bought straight skirt, and a modern jacket which I refashioned into a convincing 40’s style.  The hat and my shoes are both from Target.  Not perfectly accurate, but the outfit feels comfy yet on point with Peggy’s headliner style.

One major question I would like to throw out for everyone is why does she wear so many A-line and pencil skirt styles for the series?  The 40’s did have such skirt styles (A-line and straight), they were just less common. The way Peggy wears them so much you’d think they were typical..not meaning to nit pick, just giving a ‘historical standpoint’ view.

McCall 6278, year 1946, envelope front-comp By the way did anyone else happen to be in some sort of Season Two - cropped pic of Peggy's 'trio of triangular cut outs' dress“dress envy” with me at Peggy’s last outfit before the show ended?  It was such a statement dress and looked so smoking awesome.  Peggy’s dress just so happens to be so very, very similar to an old pattern in my collection, McCall #6278 from year 1946.  I already had a different idea of how I was going to make a dress from this pattern, but now I’m thoroughly tempted to make one just like Peggy’s dress from the show.  It would be easy, after all with such a similar pattern design…but I might stick to my own idea.

By the way, look for some look alike “Agent Carter” outfits coming to my blog in the next few months.  I’m most excited about recreating one specific dress from “Madame Mask”, aka Whitney Frost’s wardrobe.  This includes late 40’s and early 50’s goodness.  Do you like this period of fashion, or do you not know much about it?

My “Agent Carter” 1940’s Sew Along – Closing Words

Due to lack of participation and/or feedback, my “Agent Carter” 1940’s sew-along is over, as promised, now that Memorial day has come and gone.

However, I myself am sad to see it go, and will continue to post “Agent Carter” inspired projects and informative 1940’s era inspiration and info until the 4th of July, my country’s Independence day.