Besos

There is still all that snow outside you saw in my last post because we are in a rut of deep cold, with temperatures below freezing.  Having no place to go, nevertheless, can’t put a damper on the warmth of my Valentine’s Day sewing!  I’ve turned things up a notch for this year’s occasion with a spicy little number in a print so fun but totally out of my comfort zone.  I am literally covered in shiny red lipstick marks!  A lovely viscose blend base gives my bias flounced dress a flamenco flair.  It’s a perfectly swishy and showy to move in for such an outspoken print.  It has a bold and playful air.  I couldn’t resist to copy exactly the pattern’s model version when a similar fabric happened to come my way.

The word “besos” is used in Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese languages to mean “kisses”.  I think this multi-national word is an appropriately simple title for such a make, which is of a European pattern, fabric, and inspiration after all.  Personally, though, I cannot get the song “Botch-A-Mi” by Rosemary Clooney (year 1952) out of my head when I wear the dress.  As terribly hacked up the Italian language is in it, the fun song conveys the flair and energy I receive from my “Besos” dress, too.  After all, I do love a good, rich red lipstick…although in Covid times, I leave no lip print behind anymore in a 24-hour-wear formula.  Mwah!  Sending out some virtual love with this post.

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  a metallic foil printed viscose challis ordered from Minerva Fabrics

PATTERN:  Burda Style #110 “Flounce Dress” (now re-named the “Twill Dress”) from May 2015

NOTIONS NEEDED:  Nothing but thread and a bit of interfacing was needed.

TIME TO COMPLETE:  In total I spent 16 hours to make this dress, but that needs a breakdown which will be explained later in this post.  The dress was finished on January 8, 2021.

I made a fabric rose to match, as well as bought some earrings from Etsy to complete a heart bracelet my Aunt gave me years back.

THE INSIDES:  I cleanly covered the raw edges to the main body of the dress in a double zig-zag stitch.  The flounce hems were hand rolled – more on this further down.

 TOTAL COST:  a few yards of fabric cost me about $30

As odd as the print is for my taste, the construction was similarly interesting.  Sewing the dress itself was easy but the finishing was a long, straining process.  The main body fit me perfectly when I traced out my normal Burda size verbatim off of the magazine pattern insert (no extra fitting needed).  The princess seams were curvy but long, basic stitching to do.  To make things simple I eliminated the neckline facings to save myself some fuss and used wide bias tape instead.  I have installed too many invisible zippers to count now so doing so down the back seam was a bother yet not difficult.  Even the flounces were a bit challenging to add to the dress but not terrible to work with.  I did adapt the shoulders to add my own sleeves, but that wasn’t a problem either, only the fun part.  The hemming of all those flounced edges was the tiring part, because I reluctantly took the path of a higher quality.

First, though, more about my change to the sleeves and the shoulder line that led to the extra flounce hemming anyway.  The original design called for a thin sundress-style strap over the shoulders, to be covered up by oodles of ruffles which go around the entire arm opening and front chest to the dress.  I liked the look of this detailing, otherwise I would not have been interested in this pattern.  Yet, I found a similar ruffled sleeve and shoulder detailing in many mid 1930s evening gowns enough to sell me on the idea early on, even before I found a kiss print fabric. 

I was sorely disappointed.  Once pinned together, I did not like the original Burda pattern’s design which I admired through some 30’s inspiration and couldn’t go through with it.  The ruffles caused too much busyness for the elegance and princess-seamed slim lines in the body of the dress, and were very fussy to wear.  I felt like I always had to beat the ruffles down away from my face!  I could immediately picture some ugly staining upon the black crepe at the underarm ruffle – what a bad position for such a detail.   

Time for some customization!  I used the original strap pattern as a base to draft out my own piece which stretches over to the shoulder corner and fills in the armscye.  Then I chose to draft my own circle sleeves to complement the bottom flounce, the 30’s style, and swishy elegance of the rest of the dress.  I do believe such sleeves give my dress a very Spanish ‘flamenco dancer’ kind of air.  However, they did add a lot more length of hemming that needed to be done, for as much as I liked what they added to the dress’ appearance. 

Often, but not always, the prettiest things to sew sometimes also take the most time.  Bias cut flounces have not always been on that list, but they now are.  In years past, I have done a 3 step machine stitched hem of a bias flounce.  Staystitch ¼ inch from the raw edge, turn the edge under, stitch on the fold, clip the excess, and turn under again for a small machine made hem.  (This was done on the sleeves of my blue 30’s gown.) Such a process would’ve been much too complex for the yards and yards of hemming which this kisses dress needed.  I’ve never had good success with a specialty foot for such a purpose either, especially when there are seams to get in the way, although I made it work on this skirt

Most recently, I’ve normally relied on a local sewing room’s rent-to-use machines to make a tiny serged hem such as what I did here on this flounced edge wrap dress (post here).  As much as I did like how that stitching turned out it was not a rousing success.  The tiny hemming has tended to rip off of the edge of the fabric – bummer.  Did I really want to do that again, anyway?  Besides, I don’t currently have convenient access to a serger (overlocker).  No, I needed a better, cleaner way. 

I wanted to use this project as a spur to learn the proper way to make a hand worked rolled hem.  I see such a detail on all of the couture gowns I have been able to examine at museums and fashion exhibits.  It is not hard to do, just very tiny, time consuming work, one of the favorite stamps of pride to anything designer.  Not that this dress is remotely close to anything like that, but the color black hides lots of flaws.  Thus, I figured this would be my ‘training’ piece to get the knack down before needing it for a high-class project.  

After watching a few different internet videos and written tutorials to have a preliminary lesson, I dove right in.  I soon discovered I needed to wear a head lamp for the whole hemming job and could have used some magnifying glasses, too.  You need to only grab a few threads at the points you catch the fabric.  It is tricky, but after a few hours in on the job I found my pattern of both proper stitch spacing and a comfortable arm level at which to sew.  In all I spent 8 hours on the dress and then I am crazy enough to go and spend 8 hours on the hand stitching – 5 hours for the bottom flounce, and 1 ½ hours on each sleeve hem. 

This hand rolled hem job demonstrates more than anything else recent my dedication to both what and why I sew…only it is such a sadly subtle, unnoticed detail.  I would almost prefer it to be a bold statement, but then, my whole me-made wardrobe is a testimonial to that in itself.  Rather, I’ve had the privilege to look at the famous original Schiaparelli “Lobster” dress up close, as well as the best Dior and Lee McQueen garments, for just a few instances.  You know what?  The unassuming details on all of them combine with the pretentious particulars to make such iconic pieces all the more impressive.  A hand rolled hem is the wall-flower, who deserves all the credit, in the back of a room while the person hailed by the crowd only did half of the work.  To make that amazing outfit which delights the eyes from afar, well-crafted finishings are only a silent whisper which adds to the loud presence of a good-looking sewing creation. 

This simple little Valentine’s dress has something in common with them now, and even if I’m the only one that sees that, I’m happy.  There is in inner drive behind such a detail, I do believe, a love of the beauty to the craft of sewing, no matter if the maker you or me or McQueen.  It’s nice to feel that these techniques make couture feel attainable for the home seamstress, but I find it more fulfilling to find through them a camaraderie with the designers I respect.  It gives me a personal sense of pride, too.  I’m not just making clothes to wear.  It’s bigger than that – but this post also needs to be shorter than the time it would take me to emotionally vent about it here. 

So, I’ll wrap this post up by saying I’ll imagine all the kisses on my dress are for all of you my blog readers, all of those along the way whose posts have inspired me, the relatives and friends who have supported my sewing journey, and the wonderful people who have brightened my day with a compliment or a chat because I am wearing something I made.   My love goes to my family, especially – yes, always.  My little photo bombing fur baby is always there to give his canine compassion, help me laugh, and share the love, too.  I hope this Valentine ’s Day finds you and yours happy.  Hopefully, it will be a good day to wear something that signifies how you feel inside, like me!  Besos!

“For the First Time in Forever…”

“…There’ll be actual, real, live people.  It’ll be totally strange, but wow, am I so ready for this change!”

– words of the character Anna from the 2013 Disney Animated movie “Frozen”. Watch the movie’s sing-along song video here!

I’ll be singing her song too (hopefully soon) this year when fully coming out of isolation with my family!  For us, it has been too long of a time away from many “formerly normal” happenings such as vacations, hugs with friends and family, or exciting live but crowded concerts.  Now, I found the perfect dress to sew for a materialization of such feelings – an ‘Anna dress’ from the song sequence “For the First Time in Forever”! 

Now this particular introductory entry in my “Pandemic Princess” collection ended up the most expensive out of all the rest, as well as the most recognizable compared to its film inspiration.  I also just finished sewing it the week before the end of the 2020 year.  For these reasons, and the fact “Frozen” always seems to make strong Christmas appearance yearly, my Anna dress was what I wore for the few safe and social-distanced holiday occasions we had this year.   Wearing my tiara and Anna dress around to all the socially distanced outdoor lights displays was the perfect place to both be ‘Disney-fied’ and over-the-top fancy without turning any other heads besides those of the little girls. 

I tell you one thing – the smiles that lit up and the eye twinkles which appeared in the females 8 years and younger as we passed were the most amazing pay back for my sewn projects EVER!  Those little girls gave me this happy, expressive face letting me know they ‘got’ my dress, and 100% understood its reference.  It was our little instant secret together, no need for a spoken word.  To think – I had just made their moment special, and they made mine in return!  It was the most touching social result of all my outfits, even princess ones.  Sure, I got adult compliments too, but they did not seem to know the Disney reference when we spoke and seemed to appreciate the outfit for itself (which is fine and welcomed just the same).  Leave it to the innocent to give the most direct and truest means of communication – through facial emotions.  Luckily, I could read their faces as the younger set often are not required to wear Covid face masks!

The red-brown headed Princess Anna is a character that’s sweet but quirky, optimistic, impulsive, ever ready to be helpful, and only 18 in age at the time of the original “Frozen” of 2013, Disney’s 53rd animated film.   The story is set in the mid 1800s in the fictitious Scandinavian fjord town of Arendelle.  Anna has a sister three years older (Elsa, who is crowned Queen) with magical abilities and both of them have been locked away in the castle for a decade through their childhood because of those powers.  There are situational and emotional complexities that arise when the lives of the two sisters are changed after their quarantine is lifted.  Rather than the classic Disney pattern of a romantic relationship tale, the film duo has given us a loving sister relationship they have to fight for at the forefront of their story – but that only comes manifest at the end of the first movie. 

The particular dress I chose to interpret for myself focuses on an earlier part of the storyline when Anna is excited and naive while Elsa is uneasy and afraid.  (Read a great critique of the meanings and moods behind each of the verses of “For the First Time in Forever” here.)  Their outfits are very ethnic inspired, with a nod to historical dress, for the special occasion of coronation day.  Anna’s dress is particularly abundant with traditional Norwegian rosemåling in the form of embroidery all over her skirt panels as well as her bodice neckline.  While I love the colors of, details on, and overall effect of the outfit, I felt this was the one I disliked the most out of all the costumes the girls wear in both “Frozen” movies.  That was hands down the one I had to reinvent for myself.  I had to figure out my own way to like that distinctive film dress for it to be redeemed in my mind. 

There was something about the movie version of Anna’s outfit from “For the First Time in Forever” which slightly bothered me.  Either she is missing a blouse as an under layer to it (such as Elsa her sister wears) or Anna’s top mimics a decorated corset.  Also, the fact it was solid black kind of overwhelmed the skirt too much in my mind and took away from her necklace.   Those ‘sleeve’ drapes across her shoulders needed to go away in my mind, as well, but I can still vaguely understand the idea of how Disney drew that detail looking at mid-1800s styles (see picture at right).  Next, the challenge was finding a more familiar historical reference for my own version.  Through all the vintage pattern scrolling I do on a regular basis, I had noticed a very similar style of gored and pleated skirt (according to design lines, I mean) had been on dresses circa 1949 to the late 50’s.  The popularity of the full skirts which needed floofy slips to keep a bell shape was for me a natural channel to begin interpreting Anna’s dress.  Sewing pattern Advance #8551 from the early 1950s is labelled as the ‘Pretty-As-A-Princess Dress’, interestingly enough.

I chose a vintage Burda Style pattern dating to June 1955, reprinted in July 2020 as #121, as my base because I saw the opportunity to make the blouse and the skirt more harmonious together.  The panels to the skirt as well as the neckline binding to the Burda pattern were just the exact width of the faux rosemåling embroidery light green panels.  The bottom half of the Burda design streamlined Anna’s long length, deeply pleated skirt by merely being a configuration of triangular godets and rectangular panels ending at knee length.  I did reduce the number of godets and panels to 10 of each instead of 14 each to end with a smooth, ungathered skirt.  However, beyond this slight adjustment I sewed the design up as it was from Burda, and I couldn’t be happier with both the fit and the final look!

The dress was really not that challenging to make, just very time consuming.  There were sooo very many straight seams to assemble the skirt, and the bodice had underarm gussets.  However, as long as I had every piece and matching point numbered it was all decently clear and not confusing.  The bodice ended up fitting on the slightly snug side while the waist turned out rather too generous when I chose to use my ‘normal’ size which I always use in Burda patterns.  My scarf belt hides and pulls in the loose fitting waist and the stretch in my fabric accommodates to the slightly snug bodice.  Overall, though, this vintage Burda reprint turned out practically the best out of all their reissues.  The greatest trial was sandwiching the zipper in between the left side underarm gusset and the skirt panels.  I love how the gussets give the bodice such a fine shape and ease in movement.  The skirt panels matched perfectly together into the waistline.  This was a joy of a project, if a bit overwhelming.

Now, you are probably bothered with curiosity by now over the fact that my fabric print is just like the movie version.  The answer to that doubles as the reason why my Anna dress was expensive.  I had a movie look-alike design printed on 100% cotton sateen through the Spoonflower site.  It was a color scheme created by an existing account which specializes in Disney cosplay – not of my own making.  Nevertheless, Spoonflower services are not cheap, but when you have a great idea that has turned into more of a mission…well, I figured it was my Christmas treat.  The ‘embroidery’ look is achieved through a feathered sketching that mocks true rosemåling.  I actually used it to my advantage at the neckline to actually embroider over the faux print to keep the overlapping down in place.  This way decorative topstitching hides in plain sight the useful tacking! 

The fabric was printed in panels which alternate both decorative strips and solid green blocks so I could cut the respective pattern pieces I wanted out of each kind of section.  This printing layout was needed to fit the pattern pieces but required me to buy at least 4 yards of material…a pricey amount to need through a custom order.  I chose cotton sateen so my dress would have a crisp structure and a slight shine.  The Spoonflower sateen doesn’t take to ironing very well, and my fabric actually came with a printing flaw, so I regard their services as a necessary evil to be endured in times of particular creativity.  The sateen is soft and pretty, and seemed to be the perfect fabric choice for this dress anyway.  All is well that ends well, especially when it is something which ends up this pretty!

To complete the Anna ensemble, I chose a vintage 90’s cross-on-a-ribbon choker from my childhood, a cotton sateen sash belt, and finally Charlie Stone shoe company’s Hallstatt suede heels.  Charlie Stone came out with a “Frozen” inspired shoe collection last fall, 2020.  I chose the Hallstatt suede flat heels because they match perfectly with the shoes Anna wore in “For the First Time in Forever”.  Besides, they have a subtle nod to Elsa, Anna’s sister, with the cut out designs.  All of these accessories add the right touches of black for my taste, for the perfect remaking of Anna’s movie outfit.  My vintage 1950s earrings are from my Grandmother, laid out in a very Arendelle-style trefoil design which matches both my shoe cut-outs and the dress’ faux rosemåling on the light green panels. 

What princess would be complete without a crown, too?!  I chose the Anna crown from The Disney Store, [SPOILER ALERT] as it is a copy of the one she wore at her own coronation at the end of “Frozen 2”.  It is a very substantial metal enameled piece which is beautiful and surprisingly well made.  It also finalizes my outfit by completing in symbolism Anna’s journey from unnoticed, naïve princess to a capable queen.

For as much as I love this particular princess outfit, I do have a disclaimer.  The two “Frozen” movies are to be included in my blog post series for reasons far less personal or intentional than the rest of my “Pandemic Princess” outfits to come.  After all, Elsa and Anna are part of the Disney princess “club” which has been a popular franchise in the last few decades.  Yes, their movies are a feast for the eyes and ears, besides enjoyable to watch (if rather moody and emotive for kids).  The “Frozen” tales are also the most recent big deal in the Disney princess realm, as can be seen by the heavy marketing still existent in the kid’s section of any store online or in-person.  Yet, what truly wins me over are the fashions the two sisters wear.  If only just animation, I am enamored by the colors, the details, and everything about what is worn by the leading ladies of “Frozen”.   

All this being said, however, I really don’t like the movies.  Sorry to the fans who are offended by this, but I’m being honest on my own platform here (so don’t come at me, please).  They aren’t the kind of movies from the “Golden Age” of the 90’s Disney that I adore enough to know every single word to all the songs.  Nor can I relate to the “Frozen” characters enough, even though they are very adult in character and conflicts.  Compared to what the inspiration basis is for the “Frozen” movies, I think the original source provides a far more impressive, memorable, and teaching tale than the washed down, modernized Disney version.  Hans Christian Andersen penned The Snow Queen, or Sneedronningen in its original Danish, in December 1844 and it is almost unrelatable to Disney’s version, even if they did do an excellent job at reinventing the story in a compelling manner.  Here is an outstanding blog post that does a very good side-by-side of the original Anderson Snow Queen tale with the storyline of the first “Frozen” movie.  I suggest you go read it and make your own decision, too.

So – can you guess which princess (I mean Queen, hint, hint) is coming to my “Pandemic Princess” installment next?  My interpretation will be a merged association of several different yet related influences.  After all, the original Anderson Snow Queen tale inspired more than just “Frozen”.  It also most probably shaped another more villainous character with ice powers who is in a well-known and widely loved children’s’ story series written by a 20th century author.  As someone for which ‘the cold has always bothered me anyway’, stepping into this next character was a fun and challenging change of thought for me that turned out successful (if I do say so myself). 

Stay tuned and thank you for reading!

No-Sweat Scuba

Modern day fashionable scuba knit has a reputation of having insulating properties which often renders it uncomfortable for any warmer weather.  “Surely this does not have to be the case?” I have always thought.  “There must be a way around designating it for winter or sweating uncomfortably in scuba knit”…this has been knocking around in the backburner of my creative brain.  Anyone who knows me is aware I love a creative challenge, and I enjoy pushing real or assumed boundaries in sewing.  I do find this still new-to-me neoprene fabric a joy to work with (for its extreme ease to sew).  Yet it’s also a pain at the same time because I normally despise polyester.  However the siren’s call of a sewing mystery overcame such objections in my head.  Now, several projects in on experimenting with scuba knit, I think I have finally found a way to be able to appreciate wearing it in any season or weather!

Using a Burda Style pattern for a wrap-on sundress, this scuba creation just floats on my body and minimally hugs my skin for a sweat-free experience, whatever the temperature!  It is a design with simplicity of shape yet small details that are special.  It covers enough skin for my taste but is also daring enough to be a bit of a departure from my regular way of dressing.  The foiled print of the fabric causes this dress to seem so fancy yet overall it is not so much over the top to still be wearable for many occasions.  For a look a bit outside of the box, this sundress actually works pretty well worn as a jumper over a blouse or even a turtleneck for the winter.  It was so remarkably easy to sew, as well, being a one evening project.  In all, I could not be more pleased with this new creation!  Not too often does an elegant dress turn out so versatile.  I do believe I found the best balance yet for creating with scuba knit!

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  a suede finish polyester scuba knit

PATTERN:  Burda Style “Jersey Wrap Dress” pattern #101 from July 2016

NOTIONS NEEDED:  nothing but thread and two buttons (from on hand)

TIME TO COMPLETE:  This was whipped up in 2 hours from start to finish on April 6, 2020.

THE INSIDES:  …left raw as scuba knit does best

TOTAL COST:  The fabric was bought on clearance at JoAnn Fabrics at about $30 for 3 yards.

From the moment I saw this Burda wrap dress pattern, I loved it but for some reason it took me 4 years to finally find the right material to pair with it.  It is always such a relief to find such a successful and satisfying end to an idea so long on the backburner of my creative mind!  I felt that with so much fabric below the waist in the skirt portion, and so little (comparatively) in the bodice, a jersey knit as the pattern recommends would only pull down the bust and straps to the point it might either warp the fabric or mar the look of it hanging on the body (maybe both).  A scuba knit has a good stretch but is also quite stable so it was the perfect unconventional choice.  I also immediately saw that the wide sweeping hem of the dress would be a beast the make a tiny hem upon, so the scuba knit wonderfully simplified this step.  Along this line I also left out any bodice facings or edge finishing.  A raw cut edge is just fine as it is when it comes to a scuba knit – so simple!

Perhaps the most interesting feature to this dress is the dual shoulder straps, cut on (continuous) with the front bodice piece.  I love the way there are pleat-like folds that form in the front by this design feature!  You have to turn each strip in on itself to create two tubes (more or less) connected to the bodice, and then stitch those to the back bodice.  I did not iron them down flat – I liked the puffy way they look and feel on my shoulders.  Just to note, I did not change up the design of the straps at all, I merely did not twist the two straps together as the pattern’s line drawing shows and instructions intended.  To stabilize the straps (they cannot have any stretch but need to support the whole of the dress), I sewed in sheer mesh “stay tape” with the stitching.  

The deep, wide bottom flounce panel to the skirt gives this dress such a fun flair.  It is also the reason this dress needs so very much fabric!  As I did not hem this dress (scuba knit, remember?) but traced out the pattern as if it was going to have one, it ended up a pretty midi length I think is a bit elegant.  This is the same reason the neckline was a bit higher than it was supposed to be…no edge stitching because of no hem facing.  That’s fine for me – I like the slightly better coverage so as not to show cleavage. 

In lieu of long ties to close this wrap dress, I opted for a simple but fancy button closure using the one faux crystal notion leftover from making this cocoon coat (posted here).  Inside the wrap, I used a single unmatched wooden button from on hand.  To make the loops, there is a small remnant of ¼ bias tape sewn down in half lengthwise and stitched to the edge of the waist seam.  The rich-toned, silver accented fabric speaks volumes on its own…long fussy ties would distract from that.  Keeping the dress’s features relatively low-key adds to its versatility, as I said above. 

Yes, I know, I might seem to contradict myself by overdoing the simplicity of the dress by adding a lot in terms of accessories.  I went all out by adding grey stockings, bling (made by me), layers of pearls (vintage from my Grandma), braided up-do (can I brag about my upside down French braid?), and hair flowers (handmade for this dress), but can you blame me?  This was the outfit I had for our quarantined celebration of our wedding anniversary.  As this year’s celebration was at home, I had to go all out with my outfit, right?!

It’s amazing just how much can change a sewing project like the choice of fabric.  In this dress’ case, the scuba knit elevated a simple, casual sundress into something deluxe and helped me find a new way to appreciate such a modern material.  The skirt has more fullness to its silhouette and the entire dress keeps its shape better with the scuba…all just what I was aiming for originally.  What I did not plan for was for me to like this project as much as I do.  I felt rather doubtful and experimental at both the outset and the sewing of the dress.  It’s so nice to have your expectations exceeded by a successful sewing project!  I attribute it to giving scuba knit one more reluctant try because I had a wild sewing idea that gave me renewed energy.  Never be afraid to be creative, inspired, and follow your dreams.

Cabriolet Climate

Where we live, the temperature outside is now set to bake, the spring flowers are a seemingly distant memory, and the kids have been out of school for far too long.  It’s definitely time to cool off by some water, grab the bug spray, and sport those fun summer fashions, in colorful floral prints.  Finally, I can look forward to dressing for those opportunities to take our newest car acquisition, a fold-top convertible, out for a spin!  Drive-in movies and drive-up dining is a par above now.

I do believe this post’s Burda Style make – fresh off the sewing machine – is the perfect thing I recently chose to put on for one of those occasions.  In these times of social distancing and limited availabilities of the traditional summer entertainments, our new convertible is our current favorite Covid-precautionary way to get out, mingle, and enjoy the weather…as well as a very good reason for me to use fashion to slay for the day!

This is another one of those wonderfully easy-to-sew, wrap on, no closures needed, minimal fabric usage projects which I have been sewing lately.  Happily, I made this work using a one yard remnant, yay!  It has colors that pop like fireworks on the 4th of July.  What more could I ask for?!

I only made the top you see here, and the vintage-inspired, high-waisted skinny jeans are RTW reproductions from Hell Bunny brand (‘Charlie’ capris that are full length on my petite frame).  I can’t recommend this brand enough for quality denim bottoms which are the best of both modern materials and vintage fit with great details (not sponsored, just an ecstatic customer, by the way).  My shoes are from yet another one of my favorite ‘modern with a vintage influence’ brands – Charlie Stone.  My bright red lips are not going to get smeared around anytime soon, even with wearing a mask or a breezy car ride, as I used Maybelline’s SuperStay 24 hour color (in Optic Ruby).  See?  I am so totally equipped for convertible riding!

THE FACTS:                                                                                                                     

FABRIC:  a cotton-polyester blend print remnant, semi-lined in a plain white poly remnant

PATTERN:  Burda Style #132 pattern, “Waistcoat” when released in 2012, “Wrap Tank” in 2014

NOTIONS:  lots of thread and several yards of (true vintage cotton) bias tape

TIME TO COMPLETE:  Even with all the fitting fuss I had to do, still from start to finish this was a 7 hour project, and finished on June 9, 2020.

THE INSIDES:  Part of the inside edges are covered because of the partial lining, the side seams are bias bound, and the complex front seams are raw as there is enough polyester in the fabric to keep it from unravelling.

TOTAL COST:  The tropical fabric was bought at a rummage sale, where everything I bought was $1 a pound.  As this fabric was a super lightweight poly blend, it cost nearly nothing on its own.  The little bit of lining I used was from my scrap stash…so this is in total as good as free.

This is an old pattern by Burda Style’s standards on their website now.  It is originally back from 2012, and this wrap top pattern was one of the very first that I bought from Burda (along with this dress pattern) when I first started up my blog.  Yes, it has taken 8 long years on my sewing queue’s backburner before I got around to actually finding the right fabric for it, and then finally making it!  I am getting around to completing so very many of these long planned projects ever since quarantine hit.  At least my sewing mojo has not taken a hit through all of this mess!  As I say every time I finish one of these projects, it feels so satisfying to finish such long planned ideas, also making them incredibly fun to wear!

Truth be told, this was a bit of a frustration to make, as I had difficulties getting it to fit me right.  I chose my normal size with Burda patterns, and sewing it together with no changes gave me a garment which was quite loose above the waist and perfect below that.  I had to sew slightly wider seam allowances in all the seams around my upper torso to evenly spread out to amount needed to take in.  This process involved lots of try-ons and a little stitch here, a little unpicking there.  All in all, I realized there isn’t a truly ‘perfect’ fit here since the fit of this top is fluid being a wrap-on.  The way it hangs changes with how I move.  Thus, the general fit I was aiming for was to eliminate any slop room for the wrap to have an opportunity to fall off my shoulders and gape.  This was supposed to have been a simple project, but hey – it was worth it.  I want every project I make to look its best…so I can look my best!

I stripped down the construction and instructions so make this as effortless and summer-appropriate as it looks.  The design calls for full body lining and material such as twill or suiting.  These would make it more like a menswear inspired structured vest – not the perfect material in my mind for something relaxed and casual, much less for something for hot temperatures.  I only lined the center back panel to help the top lay flat against my back, use up a lining scrap, and cut down on the amount of visible raw edges.  The dual back slit vents were ditched in lieu of basic straight seaming.  Nothing was interfaced except for the faux pocket flap.  I eliminated all facings along the edges and opted for a tiny ¼ inch bias tape hem which was then turned under.  The amount of extra time I spent to adjust the fit was balanced out by the easy finishing techniques. Otherwise, everything else to the design lines and length proportions was kept as-is.

The pattern called for just over two yards of material originally, but if anyone knows me, you now I like to have my piece layouts be as efficient as is humanly possible.  I also love to use up smaller scraps of material in the most inventive ways!  So – yes – I somehow made this top work out of one yard.  I slightly slanted the grainline of the front panels, but as the fabric weave was so tight I figured (correctly) that it would not make that big of a difference.  I completely ignored the grainline to the pockets as well, since they are interfaced anyway.  This is something I rarely do but hey, I was determined.  I really felt this was the right fabric to pattern pairing and was going to make this work out in some form or fashion.

I must say I am so much more impressed with my new wrap top than I ever expected!  I am sure the convertible drive while wearing it added to my preliminary love for my new project.  Yet, the more I wear it, I still fall head over heels for it and want to say it’s my favorite.  (All my projects are really my ‘favorite’, I never can decide when it comes down to it!)  The interesting engineering, simple individuality of it is fantastic.  It is a remote relative to these previous wrap projects (the 3 armhole 60’s dress and this halter 70’s dress) but only tweaked and worn backwards to great effect – a smarter blouse version, in other words.  The front faux pockets and tricky seaming there added a touch of tailoring that confuses me but seems to balance out the longer length.  It all works out so well together.

Oh, how I do love to go all out and wear my vintage hats and vintage scarves to keep my hairstyles in place when convertible driving for a practicality and to make a chic presentation!  Ultimately, however, I do love the irony of this outfit – it is a German pattern design worn in a car from a German car company.  For modern patterns, Burda Style is my preferred choice for reasons such as this top.  German engineering always has been quite commendable.  For being a modern car (I like 90’s and earlier sleek and fast sports cars normally), this convertible VW EOS is pretty darn cool, besides being a bargain of a deal, as well.  The electrics of the fold-away hard top – hence why it is technically a cabriolet – are amazing (watch someone else’s video of the process here, if you’re interested, jump to time 2:25).  It’s too bad summer weather here is such a short time out of the year!