Long Dog Dreams

If you follow my blog, or know me even in passing, you soon realize my love for dachshund dogs.  Just like sewing and sunshine, they make me happy!  My own little long yet short fur baby is the sweetest companion I could ever find, but lately, younger versions of him have been also catching my eye.  This past year, my parents picked up a cute and rambunctious dappled dachshund puppy.  More recently, after watching LouLou the famous dachshund have her litter of puppies 10 weeks ago, I’ve actually had some happy dreams of half a dozen happy little wiener dogs all over me.  Now, I do have plenty of store bought pajamas and nightwear that are made of dachshund prints, but nothing hot dog related self-made to sleep in.  It was high time to correct that situation so I could have more ‘long dog dreams’.  I dare you to look at the picture and not yawn!

This project is a fun merging of modern-made-vintage which I rarely do to this degree.  Yes, I used a true vintage pattern to make something out of its contemporary antithesis – polyester fleece.  This combo sounds like ‘heresy’ deep down to my old school sewing heart, but the print had me at first sight.  Besides, I don’t mind redeeming fleece every so often (look how I further redeemed fleece as a fashionable coat here).  Fleece can be so much more than just no-sew blankets!  The 40’s style is something so pretty and feminine for nightwear, fleece or not, I figure I couldn’t go wrong adding a dachshund print to the mix!

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  polyester fleece – a JoAnn store exclusive print – fully lined with contrast sleeves in a lightweight polyester interlock

PATTERN:  Simplicity #2269, year 1947

NOTIONS:  Thread and ¼ inch ribbon

TIME TO COMPLETE:  The nightgown was made in about 5 hours and finished on January 22, 2020.

THE INSIDES:  left raw…as one does with knits

TOTAL COST:  about $30

The fleece I used is not what you would normally expect or find.  It is thin and a different kind of plushness, closer to a velvet than anything else – quite dreamy!  However, I do believe in the possibility of too much of a good thing.  So, I chose a contrast for the sleeves and waist ties.  This contrast fabric is also the same I used to fully line the inside body (which you can see here), because no fleece is immune to the bane of static electricity.  The light interlock does not really add weight, but keeps the fleece from sticking to me as I wear it.  When you make it yourself, you can cater to your every idea for a glorious creation that is something you will enjoy so much more than RTW.

There are no closures and relative simplicity of lines – this is a popover and tie nightgown.  This helped make it a quick and easy creation.  The size was technically too big for me, but I made it as-is (I didn’t want to bother with grading) and simply sewed in wider seam allowances.  Doing so had me worried at first because it looked so oversized!  However, the ties – sewn into the side seams – cinch in in just fine.   It is okay to be a bit lazy when sewing nightwear?  I mean why wait until it’s done to be chilling out?! Perhaps the overall relaxation of it all was wearing off on my sewing practices this time around.  If you want a slightly easier-to-find and more modern version of the pattern I used for my nightgown (thus more reasonably priced, too), search for Butterick #5688 from 2011.

For as simple as it was, my nightgown is not lacking in the conventional 40’s details such as shirred shoulders and puff sleeve caps.  These details were slightly more difficult in double layered knit.  I added a bit of extra detail myself – a thin, pink ribbon top-stitched 5/8 inch away from the neckline edge.  There’s two reasons behind my bonus trimming.  Firstly, it’s pretty (and I had a whole roll to use on hand)!  Secondly, it keeps the neckline stable, preventing it from stretching.  Something which is useful yet decorative is a great all-around win!

There was a happy surprise when I opened the envelope for the nightgown pattern.  This bonus to the pattern has kept me further occupied than sewing this simple nightgown.  There were four pages torn out of a 1940s Wards catalog, along with newspaper clippings, showing slips and more nighttime wearing options.  I love happy finds like this!  Anyone ever heard of “Madeline Patterns” from Kansas City, as seen on the two clippings?  These ephemeral scraps have become quite acidic and brittle over the years and although I scanned them in, they are still a bit hard to see but still so fun to look at, so here’s a little preview.  My favorite is the little, ruffled, one-piece, shorts playset….or maybe my favorite is the wrapped crop top and trousers, I can’t decide!

Luxurious nightwear seems to be taking the spotlight nowadays with people staying at home more than ever nowadays.  On Instagram, people seem to be calling it many things, but my favorite is the “Hibernation Libation” hashtag.  Luxurious nightwear and elegant loungewear does make for the perfect indulgence – much lower in calories than ice cream.  Speaking of a treat, just look at all the dachshunds around me when I wear this nightgown…and in my favorite colors of pink and turquoise!  You know, I even wore my treasured dachshund house slippers, too, that were a very good gift from my mom!

Now is a great time to remember you are beautiful, worthwhile, and loved…and dressing up for your own well-being is very important now more than ever when we are stuck at home in droves.  Take care of yourself, however that means.  For me, that includes continuing making and wearing fabulous, useful clothes which both make me happy – like this nightgown – and help me feel like my normal, non-quarantined self!

You Can Spot a Dachshund Lover…

…by what they wear!  Weenie dogs are now in the popular spotlight more than ever.  Crusoe the Celebrity dachshund won the 2018 People’s Choice Award just the Sunday before, Lou Lou the mini dachshund has been featured by Ellen DeGeneres and Snoop Dog, and Harlso the Balancing Hound is getting big attention with his talent for using his head.  We even enjoy racing the little things!  Dachshunds are on greeting cards, home products, and every sort of wearable item from socks to bow ties.  Of course, this is nothing too surprising to me – I am a proud dachshund owner myself, just as my last three generations have been on my mother’s side!  It seems that I mostly get the wiener dog goods, so this time it is my husband’s turn to show his taste in dogs with a subtle vintage style made for him by me!

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  100% cotton shirting

PATTERN:  Advance #9414, year 1960

TIME TO COMPLETE:  This was sewn up in about 6 hours and finished on May 4, 2018

TOTAL COST:  $15 or less

The back envelope description is the weirdest summary of a design that I have yet to see.  It speaks about the shirt pattern in a titular first or third person voice, as if it were a real living thing.  “Shirt is especially good for the sports lover…” and “Shirt loves many fabric looks” are just disturbing and confusing sentences while totally laughable at the same time.  If the writers for Advance were trying to be cool, they fell so short.  It they were just being overly brief, well, it sure does make this pattern memorable!

Besides the text oddity, there isn’t much to say about this shirt except that the print and a good fit really make it pop.  I was lucky with this pattern – it has a perfect fit and proportions for my husband.  The sizing on men’s vintage shirt patterns tend to be generous in a size medium and up so I merely took out the given seam allowances to this design to end up with a slightly smaller fit, just right for him.

Even though there is no polyester or spandex in this shirting cotton from the local chain fabric store, it is really nice, with just a touch of sheen finish.  When it comes out of the wash, however, the shirt is a wrinkled mess yet a light steaming of the iron takes care of this easily.  This is the second time I have used this line of cotton shirting – the first was this Burda polka dot blouse for myself.  I may be hooked!

In order for him to feel like he is getting the star treatment with his handmade shirt, I finished off the inside with all French seams, even for the sleeve armscyes.  The hems and facing edges are covered in a pale yellow bias tape for a fun and clean finished contrast.  He always has to pick out his own buttons for everything I make for him, but this time I definitely swayed his decision into choosing some muted toned beige-brown swirled buttons, vintage items from the notions stash of his Grandmother.  They are still the basic four-holed shirt style buttons he likes, but I love how the colors match with the dachshund print to be noticeable but not be distracting.  Men’s clothes can have ‘matchy-matchy’ elements, too, right?

Speaking of matching, this print was a pain to line up.  The dachshunds are small enough that I didn’t bother the match up the sleeves and the side seams, but otherwise the rest was a bit of a challenge on only 1 ½ yards of material.  I am pretty happy with how my matching attempt turned out, especially across the back shoulder panel where I needed to line up the staggered alignment of the print.  Of course, with the little pleats in the main (lower) body of the shirt it only matches up across the middle of the back, but pleats are an infinitely better feature than gathering below the shoulder panel…one of the reasons I chose this pattern.  It has simple, clean, classic design lines that make it the best option for a print.  A solid would look really classy in this pattern, too, but I always associate the fun novelty prints as befitting for 50’s and 60’s menswear.

This was a really good birthday present to whip up for him, because he has been wearing this so much!  There seems to be just as much dachshund fabric to be found as everything else, and I do have a small stash of such prints so there will be a slow and steady flow of more wiener dog makes to come!

The silhouette of a dachshund is pretty silly, cute, and unmistakable all at the same time.  I’d like to think this may be one basic reason for the popularity of such prints, but many of our neighbors have dachshunds or dachshund mix breeds so they are a popular modern household pet, anyway.  Scottie dogs were all the rage in the 1930s with their images on feedsack prints, purses, and the like.  Models would pose walking a Scottie and they could be spotted in movies back then.  (A Scottie was chosen over Otto the dachshund in the famous movie “Wizard of Oz”!)  Their silhouette is every bit as unmistakable as a dachshund.  Eddie Bauer is known for their yellow or black Labrador prints. Elsewhere, other than a beagle print here and there, it is dachshunds that I see for every season’s product releases today!

Our own little dachshund!

Dachshunds were much belittled and stigmatized over their cultural association during the time between WWI and WWII.  They were stoned in streets.  One graphic WWI poster shows Uncle Sam’s hand choking to death a Dachshund wearing a Hun helmet and an Iron Cross because everything German was the enemy.  “Waldi” the dachshund helped bring back the public, universal acceptance of the breed by being the very first Olympic mascot at the 1972 Summer games in Munich.  The dachshund Waldi was designed to represent the attributes described as required for athletes — resistance, tenacity and agility.  These little loyal lapdogs could do without all the R-rated jokes on their account, though!

Halloween 2015 – Me and My Cowboy

Halloween is a bigger deal than it used to be in my life now that our little one is actually old enough to realize what it is about and enjoy it.  I’ve also realized it does give me a very good reason to sew something for my half-pint and not just myself.  In 2015, I didn’t do that much sewing for Halloween, but enough to be proud of and count as projects to share.

My outfit wasn’t much, just something I put together at the last minute.  I dressed as some sort of punk, dark, vintage-style housewife, in an original 50’s blouse, a pencil skirt, platform heels, and a handmade apron with dachshund featured print.  Yes, that is purple hair I sported for the night.  However, my son’s outfit received most of my attention.  He went as a 1940’s cowboy, with part vintage, part handmade, and the rest being items from my childhood for a special kind of outfit.

THE FACTS:butterick-2744-year-1943-envelope-front-comp-w

FABRIC:  For the cowboy: ½ yard of super clearance polyester suede with a metallic printed wrong side; For my apron: a 100% cotton M’Liss print, exclusive to the now-defunct Hancock Fabrics store.

NOTIONS:  I had all I needed for the cowboy vest and chaps, and for my apron I bought skinny bright orange single fold bias tape.

PATTERN:  A vintage original Butterick 2744, year 1943, was used as the basis for the cowboy chaps, and the apron used the “Cosmopolitan” pattern from the book “A is for Apron” by Nathalie Mornu, published 2008.  (See this post to see my last apron from this book – I’m a big fan of it!)

apron-info-comboa-comp

TIME TO COMPLETE:  The cowboy outfit parts only took me about 3 hours hours in one evening on October 29, 2015.  My apron was finished on Halloween, October 31, 2015, made in 3 hours, too.

100_6573aw-compTHE INSIDES:  The cowboy outfit is a costume so I didn’t do anything fancy inside, my apron is all clean finished bias bound.

TOTAL COST:  $2.00 for the suede fabric, and maybe $10.00 for my apron

His hat and six shooter set is mine from when I was his age, the sheriff’s badge on the vest is also mine from a visit to Silver Dollar City.  The shirt was given to us by a dear acquaintance – it a true 1940’s original with embroidery of swirls and hobby horses, fancy pockets, and special buttons.100_6460aw-comp

For the sewn part, I basically took a simple button front vest from my tykes’ wardrobe and traced it out and remade it into the faux suede.  This was easy as pie (which isn’t as easy as some sewing) – just two small side seams and even smaller shoulder seams.  Next the vest was cut and re-shaped slightly to be more open and curved so the front so his shirt can be seen.

My original plans were to only make him a vest, but my hubby said some passing comment sounding surprised as to the lack matching chaps.  I took this as a sort of challenge even though this was not at all what he meant – he just didn’t know what I had in mind.  There wasn’t much fabric to start with and even less after the vest was made…but chaps aren’t a full pants leg, anyway.  So I pulled out a vintage 1940’s children’s pattern from my stash as the basis to cut by – this way I also was testing out the fit of a pattern I wanted to make anyway.  I didn’t have a length of fabric long enough to go all the way up his leg so I merely made a large loop to add on for the top of the chaps’ legs.  The loop is perfect for the chaps100_6476w-comp to hang, or float, over his jeans.  A length of elastic is tied around his waist with the chaps’ top loops going through, and the rest hanging from that.

A rectangular strip of fabric was sewn all the way up into the side seams, then it was cut into little strips to turn it into fringe.  I love how the metallic “wrong side” makes the fringe look quite neat, bestowing just enough ‘bling’ for a little boy’s Halloween outfit.

Our little “cowboy” was so tickled by his outfit and so proud of himself.  “Mommy made it!” he would tell others on me, but that’s o.k.  Being a cowboy must run in the family.  My Grandma has a picture of her husband, my Grandpa, in a handmade cowboy outfit when he was little, so I’ve been told.  My dad loved playing cowboy himself – his room (when he was my son’s age) had a western theme to it, as I can still see in the cute printed paper lining of his old dresser set.  One of my dad’s favorite Christmases growing up was the one when he was given a western set, and he still remembers the bright red velvet hat that came with the set.  In the old pictures from then my 5 or 6 year old “cowboy” dad looks so much like my son did for Halloween – very cute to see.

100_6470aw-compMy apron is something I’ve been wanting to make for a long time.  The fabric had been bought a while back (maybe a year or two) and the apron pattern has also been on my radar of things to make ever since I bought the book in year 2011.  Now I could combine both into one!  Besides, how could I go wrong with something that combines my favorite things – a dachshund dog printed fabric (I own a dachsie, by the way), an apron, and a design named after one of my favorite mixed drinks, the Cosmopolitan.

This was super easy to make.  I like how the pockets are right over the hips – this way they can’t catch stray food like aprons with center front pockets often do.  I like the slightly vintage “café waitress” aura to it, as well, though this is not as strong with my version compared to the original in the book.  Look at how cute is that fashion themed fabric on the one in the book!  My fabric is pretty darling, nevertheless.  I mean there are cute wiener dogs dressed as a ladybug, police officer, witch, princess, and butterfly!100_6572-comp

This is not the best apron for coverage against spills and messy cooking, but it is mostly decorative anyway.  I did slightly change the pattern by both making the inner dip of the U-neckline smaller and having the center back neck closure be Velcro hook-and-look tape rather than a button and button hole.  I also had to shorten the neck straps so the waist ties would be where they should be rather than on my hips.

I went through just over 2 packs of bias tape to go around and around all the edges.  Honestly – that is the hardest and only step that takes up all my time spent to make this apron.  I thought the amount of edging I had to sew would never stop.  This sounds like a Halloween “Twilight Zone” nightmare… the “different sewing dimension where the edges to finish never stops and keeps going…with no end…you can’t take your foot off of the pedal, and the bias tape keeps coming, never lessening…”  Oh, I could have too much fun with this!  Happy Halloween everyone!

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