The “… So Many Raindrops” Dress

This might be weird to make a parallel, but rain is kind of like sewing to me – it’s refreshing, relaxing, beautiful, sometimes messy, but always the water for creative growth.  So why just stay inside on a rainy day?!

Perhaps it wasn’t the best idea to go out in a pouring, thundering rainstorm in a white dress (of all things, va voom!) but I didn’t want the wet weather to ruin my plans for wearing my newly finished project that weekend.  The print does remind me of raindrops, after all, trickling down, beading up as they occasionally do, while they take their gravity guided course.  This was my first light colored, early summer worthy garment that I made for this year.  It is a Burda Style dress with subtle, but interesting design features that was as easy to sew as it is easy to put on, all of which I really appreciate.  This might not be my best dress for this year, but it is a comfy, different, pretty dress that is versatile…and it’s out of my favorite material, rayon!

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  100% rayon challis, a Kathy Davis Designer brand print, bought from Jo Ann’s Fabric Store

PATTERN:  Burda Style #102 A, Tie Waist Dress, from March 2016

NOTIONS:  Nothin’ but white thread, a small scrap of bias tape, and a hook n’ eye!

TIME TO COMPLETE:  The dress was whipped up one afternoon, May 25, 2017, in about 5 hours!

THE INSIDES:  All French seams…

TOTAL COST:  Maybe $10 to $12

I have been seeing this style of a loose, knee-length dress with a side seam attached waist tie offered here and there through other pattern companies throughout this year (see New Look #6519 for one example), but Burda did it first in 2016 with this pattern.  In my opinion, I like this version the best, out of all the look-alikes I have seen.  And yet, I am not used to a dress that does not have a whole lot of fitting, so even though I wanted to whip up a version of this the minute I saw the pattern on the cover of the March 2016 magazine, I was unsure.  With the dress pattern simmering on the back burner of my project queue, it eventually won out, as I suddenly decided this spring season to cave in when I saw what I (finally!) felt was the right fabric for the design.

All the fullness is in the front.  This includes the fanned out pleats in the neckline and the excess which allows this to be a pop-on, no closure dress which is pulled in by the waist ties.  However, the back is so slim, trim, and fitted with darts, with a shaped waistline and small knife pleats at the neckline for shoulder freedom – it’s like two different dresses front and back!  The wrap-around bottom band unifies it all in my mind.

Rain water flows horizontally for a city dweller like me when it’s rushing through a street gutter, so the bottom panel has the blue “raindrops” running opposite the rest of the vertical direction on the body of the dress.  I also choose the same horizontal layout of the ‘rain print’ for the set-in waist ties, like a little rivulet running through my middle.  (I know I have a weird rhymes and reasons for my sewing choices sometimes! Whatever feels right inside!)  The print is so low-key, this play on thought process and the direction of the print is not as apparent as I would like, and yet I think something dramatic (like bold colored crazy stripes) would have been too much…so, I’m generally happy with it the way it is.

The best part to the dress is what I changed, in my opinion!  I extremely simplified the design by eliminating the center back zipper, opting for a front neckline closing instead.  It is just a strip of wide bias tape, stitched in a loop, snipped through and turned under with a tiny hook-and eye at the top corner hidden under the facing edges.  Besides making this dress quicker to sew and get dressed in, the front slit placket keeps the closing easy where I can see it, as well as freshening up the very high and conservatively designed neckline.  I decided after cutting out from the fabric to do this closure-free adaptation, otherwise I would have cut both the bodice back piece on the fold to eliminate the seam where the zipper was designed to be.  It was still a good thing that I cut this dress pattern out the way I did because I had enough left over to squeeze out a much needed new pillow case for my side of our bed!

I’ve never seen sleeves like these that have a shoulder cap with a shaping dart to get a curve over this angle of the body.  The darts start from the shoulder seam end and taper into the middle of the upper sleeve.  This is very interesting and different, yet not as effective in shaping after all as I would have thought.  However, it’s always nice to have a change and try something different!  In hindsight, I now wish I would’ve checked ahead of time and adjusted the overall fit of the shoulder and sleeves.  The shoulder seam is a bit short compared to the somewhere in between generous and spot-on fit of the rest of the dress.  I also wish I had given myself more reach room under the arms.  If you make this pattern, I suggest you raise up the side seams and make the sleeve seam longer at the armscye (maybe by about ½ to 1 inch) to have full movement for yourself.

To more than make up for any ‘meh’ feelings toward the dress, I paired it with some awesome accessories that are favorites from my wardrobe.  Firstly my necklace is from my beloved Grandmother’s jewelry collection, and it’s just so different – I love it.  My shoes take the cake though.  They are all leather, inside and out, and Clark’s brand so well made and so comfy.  These are something I splurged and bought for myself (much to my mom’s dismay) with my birthday money, about 17 years back.  Sorry mom, sometimes that monetary gift cannot be saved when a one-of-a-kind pair of shoes comes one’s way!  I think this was my first major indulgence in my taste for interesting shoes…and these take the cake. Why? They actually have jewels set into the bottom of the already decorative sole. Yasss!  I must admit I do like to kick up my heels, cross my legs, and overall let the soles be seen when I wear these, judiciously I might add, but I do not save them…they need to be enjoyed!  Hubby says these shoes remind him of the words in a song by Paul Simon, “People say she’s crazy, she’s got diamonds on the soles of her shoes.”  Thanks.  No, but this is not the only way I’ve accessorized it – every time I wear it (which is frequent) I have tried different jewelry, shoes, sweater (or jacket) combos, and even tie the belt differently.  This dress is like the unlimited “I can go with anything” go-to dress that just keeps making me glad now that I made it.

On to other tunes that I do like and cannot help but sing when I wear this dress –they are “Raindrops” of 1961 by Dee Clark, Enya’s “A Day Without Rain” and her “It’s In the Rain”, and finally (my favorite) Engelbert Humperdinck’s version of “Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head”.  And then there’s the amazing “Isn’t This a Lovely day To Be Caught in the Rain” with Fred Astire and Ginger Rogers. I know there’s plenty of other popular classics which mention rain, but these are my personal picks!

Just like a living thing cannot go on without water, just so I seem to survive in a different way on the creativity and self-expression that the outlet of sewing has to offer.  This is why it makes total sense for me to combine rain and sewing in one project.  I’m surprised I haven’t done this combo earlier!  Perhaps this post can even encourage you to not stay inside on that rainy day, but get out and make the most of it…just don’t necessarily wear white in it like me unless you really intend to!

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Water Nymph

The month of April is synonymous with being wet from spring showers.  The month also frequently hosts the holiday of Easter as well.  I think I’ll just be ‘one’ with it all!

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To me, there is almost nothing that equals the calming noise, relaxing loveliness, and happy beauty of being at a woodland pond and trickling creek.  Top this off with a perfect spring afternoon and Eastertime – and we couldn’t ask for a better place to hang out, do some weekend recuperating, and take some photos of my newest dress.  It is made from a simple pattern at the heart of the “Flower Child” era, 1969, and has a water-marked sort of faded tie-dye knit to match.  My inner “nature goddess” needed a self-made lilac flower crown to complete the whole ensemble!  However, for some of my pictures later on you’ll see me stripped of the sash belt, flower crown, and even shoes to go more ‘natural’…

I see pastels everywhere (fashion-wise) this season, and I am not one to purposefully follow trends, but the new, rayon-based, super-soft knits at my local fabric store tempted me, too much.  They also happen to be a designer line!  Now I can be on trend, yet still sneak in my vintage love with this dress, he he.  Vogue 7463, late 1968 or early 1969

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  a Kathy Davis Designer brand knit “Eraser Purple”- 97% Rayon 3% Spandex knit.

PATTERN: a Vogue #7463, from either late 1968 or early 1969

NOTIONS:  nothing but thread and two small strips of interfacing were needed –simple!

TIME TO COMPLETE:  the dress was finished on April 1 (2016) after about 8 hours spent to make it up.

TOTAL COST:  This fabric was a very recent purchase from my local Jo Ann’s fabric store.  I spent about $18 for two yards…a bit more than what I’m used to spending but worth it for a designer printed dress like this one!

This garment is part of two sewing challenges actually – the “Wardrobe Builder” dress project for April as well as the “Easter-Spring Dress” sew-a-long.  It is part of the “Wardrobe Builder” project because firstly, it is a dress, plus being one that is so very practical yet dressy at the same time.  This combo should make this a nice go-to for early spring, especially since it has long sleeves to keep me warm enough through the chilliness we so frequently have through the season.  My dress is part of the “Easter-Spring Dress” sew-a-long because of the obvious…it is perfect for spring and was specifically made to wear on Palm Sunday. This is part one of two dresses for this sew-a-long.

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Only because the design was so simple was I able to plan for two new garments for Easter time!  Although it is simple, the design is first class.  The instructions were very complicated for what one would think looking at the cover envelope picture and design lines of the dress.  The instructions were meant for a fully lined dress with fancy tailoring and made of a flowing woven as suggested by pattern back.  My own dress was much simplified, mostly due to the fact it’s merely made from a single layer of a drapey knit with no seam edge finishing.  I’ll admit I am not used to working with true vintage Vogue patterns – maybe such thorough instructions, fine designs, and nice details are the norm of all their offerings, whatever era they come from.  I do generally love the modern “Vintage Vogue” line of patterns for those same features.  Maybe, I just have a new ‘need’ to find and make some more old Vogue patterns!DSC_0036-comp,w

The rayon knit has a shifty, heavy drape so the wide bateau neckline, which is the highlight of the dress, needed to be interfaced.  I used a stiff, sew-in mid weight interfacing attached to just the one-piece, self-facing which gets turned inside the neckline.  However, the rest of the dress was left without anything to stabilize the seams and this seems to work out fine, but I still am not sure.  Was I supposed to add in seam tape to the long French bust darts, at least – or maybe to the side seams, too?  I didn’t.  The dress seems slightly generous in fit the way and I supposed it was because of the nature fabric but I don’t mind – it only adds to the comfort of wearing it.  However, I do have a very strong suspicion that this dress will “grow” after every wash, the fabric getting slightly bigger and out of shape.  That’s why they added in spandex to the rayon, to prevent this, so I shouldn’t be suspect.  So…for now I’m happy with it the way it is and if it does “grow” on me the more I wash and wear DSC_0047-comp,wit, I suppose I’ll either take it in or/and add on the seam tape then.

Only minor adjustment were made – to lengthen the dress hem and sleeve length by one inch.  I like this length of the dress (and it has a 2 inch hem) but the sleeves took about a 4 ½ inch hem to get them to the length they are and they are still a tad long.  Other than the fact that the sleeve armpit seam dips rather low for my preference and I raised by just under and inch, this dress was straightforward to make.

My floral crown was made from artificial lilac stems bought at the dollar store, carefully layered and wrapped around a band of floral wire with floral tape.  This coronet only cost $1 and I’m so pleased I could spend so little to come up with something every bit as lovely as I had hoped.  I would totally wear this out much more than I will, in fact – boo hoo.  It is so fun!  Hubby lets me do my own thing with my projects and outfits, but this floral crown makes him sigh and roll his eyes at me…really?!  Yes, really – it is awesome to wear just what I want and frolic in a lovely flower crown, just because I came up with an idea and was able to make something of it.  Luckily, previous experience from briefly working at a floral shop came in handy here…

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I do have to laugh at myself that I sew with a non-floral fabric and have it in my mind that it is inspired by nature.  It figures!  Oh well – after spending the week before at home being sick, this outfit gave me the prod I needed to get out and enjoy my favorite part of the outdoors.  Inspiration is everywhere.

For more pictures of my ‘frolicking’ through nature in this outfit check out my Instagram!

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