“Retro Forward” Burda Style – V-Neck Jersey Top

True 1930s patterns can be expensive, fragile, simplistic in instructions, and in a size that will not instantly fit – therefore not appealing to everybody.  Thus, I love it when a modern pattern comes out which is sneakily a true vintage design.  This Burda top is one that falls in this category, which is why it is part of my ongoing “Retro Forward with Burda Style” series. On its own it is a great design.  However, if you look to the past for verification (see this board for that), and add in an awesome sleeve adaptation (like I did) to suit both the 30’s styles and the 2017 “Year of the Sleeve”…you have modern does vintage (or is it the other way around) so seamlessly.  Yet this is not stuffy.  It’s every bit as elegant as it is as loose and comfy as a relaxed summer peasant tunic.  I’m extremely happy with this project!

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This project is perfect for me to count it as part of the “Sleevefest 2017” hosted by ‘Valentine & Stitch’ as well as ‘Dream, Cut, Sew’.  I re-drafted a very boring and basic sleeve into something elegant and detailed to match and complete the garment’s design sleevefest2017 badgeand era from which it seems to harken back to.  I always admire how the 1930’s were so rocking awesome at not forgetting that sleeves can have details, too, and add greatly to the overall rest of a garment.  After all, this is the era that had patterns specifically dedicated to offering many versions of sleeve styles to choose from and make for substituting in other garment designs.  Why not have elegant sleeves when our arms are something so useful, so full of movement, and so graceful in retrospect to the rest of the body?!  Bring on the sleeve drama!

This is by no means the only dramatic sleeve I have made this “Year of the Sleeve”…I am just behind on posting so many projects, so look for me to be leaking snippets of other garments with fancy sleeves on my Instagram!

Burda Style V-Neck Jersey Shirt, 06-2010 #108, line drawing & garment exampleTHE FACTS:

FABRIC:  a weightlessly thin polyester interlock knit with a satin-finish

PATTERN:  Burda Style pattern #108, from June 2010

NOTIONS:  Nothin’ but thread was needed…and I always have that handy here!

TIME TO COMPLETE:  The top was finished on March 29, 2017 after only about 5 hours

TOTAL COST:  Two yards of the jersey cost under $10

Now, as for any Burda Style pattern, printing and/or tracing is necessary to have a usable pattern to lay on your desired fabric.  My pattern was traced from the downloaded and assembled PDF bought at the online store but if you have a magazine issue, use a roll of medical paper to trace your pieces from the insert sheet.  It’s at this preliminary step that you pick out your proper size and add in your choice of seam allowance width.  A scissor with a magnetic ruler guide helps immensely to quicken along the step to getting a finished pattern prepped.  Sorry to repeat something you might already know, but this is just an “FYI” for those that don’t know.

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My base for my re-draft was the original pattern simple sleeve, after extending it to a full long sleeve length (it is bracelet length, otherwise).  Then, I used this very technical sleeve hack plandiagram which I found off of Pinterest as my guide for my re-draft.  (You can see more re-drafting ideas that I like and plenty eye-candy images of lovely sleeves in my Pinterest board.)  I paid close attention to measurements and proportions in the diagram and I am impressed at how perfectly the finished sleeve turned out.  Please note that the gathers are not a separate panel but are merely an extension of the sleeve – they taper into it from a dart.  I actually ended up making the final version of my sleeve with a double-long cuff so that I could fold it in completely on itself.  In other words, below the gathers, the end of my sleeve is doubled up for a substantial support to the sleeve, one that beneficially weighs it down just a tad.  I love to use my sewing capabilities to achieve exactly what I want!  I know this sounds terribly selfish, but I see it as fulfilling in reality something which previously existed in my head…which gives a very satisfactory and relieving feeling for me!  What I picture sometimes and what really ends up doesn’t always match…

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Even with the sleeve change, this was a super quick and quite easy to make project, especially as I was working with a knit that needed no finishing inside.  The only slightly tricky part was the V-neckline’s bottom point – it’s also were the front panel ends.  As long as you break stitching of the bias band facing on either side of the center, and not stitch in one continuous V, it works.  It still was a bit fiddly there.  Making the front panel lay nicely required some hand stitching at strategic points and plenty of steam from the iron, as well.

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I did go up in size from my “normal” fitting number with other Burda patterns to make this top.  I felt that a form fitting top would ruin the front gathers somewhat but even with stitching a bigger side seam allowance, my blouse is still generous.  I never really found a nice in between baggy and tight fitting for this top, but I’m ok with the looseness, for it feels very comfy and drapey, as if it is really only a play/casual top.

I paired my top with my Grandmother’s vintage jewelry and a white linen skirt for a real summer tropical theme.  My Grandmother’s jewelry is, as far as I heard, something she bought one time was in St. Augustine, Florida, circa 1950’s.  However, it seems to fill   in the wide open neckline nicely, add fun colors, and even look very similar to actual novelty vintage jewelry from the 1930s.  Our pictures were taken in a tropical conservatory in town, so with the humidity and rare, exotic plants and wildlife inside, I really had a true warm weather tolerability test in my top!  The interlock knit is light as a whisper on the skin and the long sleeves keep of both bugs and the sun’s rays.  Needless to say, my top passed with flying colors, or should I say turquoise, white, and pastel colors!

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Modern Delineator Girl

What happens when I want to imitate the cover of a vintage Delineator magazine I own, but I only have one measly yard of matching fabric to work with?  This…I become a modernly basic version of a year 1931 Delineator girl.

Delineator 1931, front cover-comp,w, & my tank dress pic

I’ve made vintage fashion up-to-date before, but never to this point.  I’ve also never used stripes in the sometimes uncomplimentary horizontal direction before, and I am still being won over to the result.  Nevertheless, this is comfy to wear, cool for summer, and as easy to sew up as it is to accessorize.

DSC_0856a-comp,wThis dress was made so I could have a patriotic set for Independence Day as part of the “4th of July Proud Dress Project” sponsored by the blog “Akram’s Ideas”.   It was worn with my handmade necklace of Lapis Lazuli beads, blue sapphire earrings, and my own navy nail art for a full American color combo – complete with sun hat!  Unfortunately, temperatures were lower than normal and a bit too chilly for me to be completely comfortable in my dress for long, so I’m looking forward to much more use of this once the full heat of summer kicks in here…especially for those dash out of the house errands or after school pick-up occasions!

THE FACTS:McCall's 6559, tank dresses with cardigan

FABRIC:  The red and white striped fabric is a lovely 100% rayon knit; the lining is an ultra-lightweight polyester interlock in white

PATTERN:  McCall’s 6559

NOTIONS:  Nothing but white thread was needed, and of course I have plenty of that!

THE INSIDES:  Pretty nice for a knit dress – as this dress is fully lined (yes!), all the seams are covered except for the raw edges of the bias binding around DSC_0859a-comp,wthe arm openings and the neckline

TIME TO COMPLETE:  The dress was finished on June 22, 2017 after only 4 or 5 hours. 

TOTAL COST:  The striped rayon knit was a folded up remnant, not even on a bolt, bought when Hancock Fabrics was going out of business.  Thus, I believe I bought this for about $2.  The interlock is something I have a stash of on hand, so I’m counting it as free making this one awesomely low cost yet high quality dress!

Rayon is my ultimate favorite fabric.  When it comes to a rayon knit, there isn’t anything more dreamy and luxurious to me.  Nevertheless, rayon knit is terribly thin and delicate.  Thus I figured my striped fabric, being a rayon knit, needed a lining if it was to be DSC_0860-comp,wpractical and wearable for me.  Giving this tank dress a full body lining eliminates any see-through issues, feels wonderful on the inside with no seam allowances rubbing, makes my dress a total step above any store bought tank dress, and helps keep the rayon dress in its proper shape.  It was a win-win all around, especially since I used the lining to even cover up the hem, doing a hand-stitched finish to “make-up” for the rest of the dress’ simple design and ease in sewing.

I have long been wanting to use this tank dress pattern and it pretty much sewed up to my high expectations.  The fit is nice only because this dress’ pattern seems to run generous and I had to take it in by an extra inch or two to get a loosely close shape.  The length was dictated by the amount of fabric available (not much – a 55 by 30 inch square) and so it is a tad shorter than I would like.  The bias binding on the armholes and neckline is interesting and was an easy and conventional means of finishing off the edges.  Somehow, though, I wish I would have made it skinnier (that is, less noticeable) as well as sewing them so that they covered up the seam allowance from the inside.  However, it works, and as I didn’t want to spend too much time working on such a basic dress, I’m happy with it how it is.

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I did choose the racer-back option, but for some reason I do not think it turned out quite as it should have.  The racer-back ends up looking (to me) like a half-hearted attempt and not a full, shoulder blade baring style as I expected.  I left the dress’ bodice back as it was because I do like the fact I do not have to adjust or change my lingerie strap configuration, as I would have had to do for a true racer-back.  However, I think it makes me seem like I have swimmer’s shoulders from behind.  I don’t swim, and although my shoulders are my strong point, I feel they are big enough and am sensitive about emphasizing them like this.  Sorry, off topic!  My point is, if you do want the full racer back to this pattern, I think you will have to do some re-cutting first.

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Here’s yet another good example of what can be done with only a yard of fabric and a vintage inspiration.  Not too often do modern patterns seem to lend themselves to being a one yard friendly project – sometimes I wonder if they’re in bed with the fabric companies.  That compatibility with small cuts of material is usually something I see provided through vintage patterns.  However, I hope this dress project of mine inspires you to keep your eyes open for both old and new opportunities to use those discounted small cuts, those remnants taking up room in your stash, or those pretty fabrics of second-hand clothing you no longer fit in.  Open them up and start experimenting with the layout of some pattern pieces and you might be surprised!

Also, just because a vintage garment or image inspires you doesn’t mean it has to translate into something old-fashioned…like my tank dress, your garment can be whatever you want it to be, for whatever occasion or era you would like!  Keep being inspired and creative out there, dear readers, and happy sewing!

Courage, Compassion, and a One-Shouldered Jumpsuit

Inspiration for my sewing comes to me from some unexpected places, sometimes.  For this outfit, it’s mostly coming from the new Wonder Woman movie but also (on a practical level) this month’s Wardrobe Builder Challenge of “Vests, Shorts, Playsuits”.  Both inspiration sources have inspired me to get my courage on and try something I’ve formerly avoided – a jumpsuit.  I went all out with my first jumpsuit and chose to make a real statement piece, using a pattern from one of Burda’s designer features, and even sneakily dividing it up so both top and pants can be worn separately to maximize my options.  I am quite taken by this outfit!  I really get the good and interested looks around me when I wear it.

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About my main inspiration, there literally hasn’t been anything since the Marvel television show Agent Carter that has had me so excited, inspired, and willing to become entrenched in the culture like the new Wonder Woman movie.  If you follow me on Instagram, you might have seen how I went all out when I saw the movie on opening night!  What I most admire about Wonder Woman is that her compassion for others only makes her more powerful – and her strength adds to her beauty in a way that has depth and character.  Her courage is innate, as is her compassion, so she breaks boundaries and expectations – it’s part or who she is and what she feels she has to do!  Her care and concern for others is her driving force, sadly at the expense of herself…much like Agent Carter.

Wonder Woman amazon logoThat said, a full-out Wonder Woman outfit will be reserved for this Halloween.  Until then, I wanted sew something “everyday wearable” to channel the Grecian/Ancient Italian-influenced look Diana had on her Amazon island paradise.  What better way to do that than to choose a design from Dimitri Panagiotopoulos, a half Greek and half Italian designer who founded his label in 2007, featured in the Burda Style April 2017 magazine.  He lets the heritage of his culture influence his lovely designs, and his styles are meant to evoke strength and confidence in a feminine way.  I love how this jumpsuit is so glamorous, bold, yet relaxed all at the same time.  This jumpsuit does take a certain courage and self-assurance to wear, I’ll admit, which can be kind of hard but is also empowering.  What a perfect design and designer to sew a modern day ‘Diana’ outfit!

All it needed was my Wonder Woman armband and head crown to complete the Grecian and DC influence!  I will revert to the fact my son wanted me to buckle and buy the armband and headband set because he now sometimes calls me Wonder Woman…what can I say, I’m soft.  Not to brag but I do think I somewhat look like her put together like this!

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I wanted to slightly call to mind the 1970s jumpsuits as well by wearing my Grandmother’s nice Trifari brand vintage jewelry (jet cabochon necklace and palm leaf earrings) with my sling back, peep toe, gold Chelsea Crew heels.  I’d like to think of my vintage gold belt as an adapted Wonder Woman “truth rope”.

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  a semi-thick and tightly stable poly-cotton-spandex blend Ponte knit.

PATTERN:  Burda Style pattern No. 121, only in the Burda Style April 2017 issueBurda121 line drawing & pic of Dimitri

NOTIONS:  I had to buy the invisible zipper, but everything else (the thread, interfacing, and hook-and-eye) needed was on hand.

TIME TO COMPLETE:  This was finished on June 12, 2017 after about 10 hours

THE INSIDES:  left raw as the knit is so stable it doesn’t fray in the least

TOTAL COST:  The fabric came from JoAnn’s Sportswear section, and with the zipper this jumpsuit cost about $30 dollars

As to the sewing part, it was really pretty easy to put together, the biggest challenge came from the pattern running so generously large.  I had to take out about 2 inches overall from the side seams of both the top and pants.  I drafted out the size that I always use in Burda Style patterns so it must have been the pattern.  I remember this problem with the other Burda designer patterns, so I’ll make the assumption that these generally run large and go down a size from now on.

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My changes were small.  First off, I added an extra 5/8 inch to the top bottom hem as I was not going to sew it into the pants but keep it as a separate top.  I did also have to add a small ¼ inch bust dart coming off of the neckline on the right side to shape the sleeveless side.  I made my own bias banding to finish off the neckline edge with a small rolled decorative edge, but merely turned under and double stitched the single armscye’s seam allowance to keep that low key.  I also was able to eliminate the need for a zipper in the top since I was using a knit and making a separate top.

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The pants have very full pleats together with handy pockets, making these comfy but something that makes me self-conscious.  Pleated pants are somewhat hard to like looking down at myself, I feel fat even though they are in a slimming black and do look good when I look at them in a mirror or picture.  Oh well!  At least I am proud of another well done, truly-invisible invisible zipper in the side!

Even though a knit-friendly interfacing seems to be recommended for the pants waistband, I went with a thick and stiff interfacing to support the heavy pants and stay the pleats.  I thought a gathered back to the pants like the design calls for was a bad idea, both for my taste and for the rest of the outfit.  So I merely made a duo of pleats to the back fullness, instead.  I figure I can always turn the pleats into darts if I want in the future.

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Please forgive the folds and creases in the fabric of my jumpsuit.  I cannot use a high heat on this fabric and the on-the-bolt fold seems like it is set on permanent press.  The fabric is so supple and flowing, those unwanted fold lines are just something I have to DSC_0768a-comp,wlive with for now, just wanted to let you know it’s not like I didn’t try.

I see a lot of possibilities with this outfit.  After all, a pair of black pants goes with anything!  The one-shouldered top half (whether worn with or without the matching jumpsuit bottoms) pairs well with the other one-shouldered Burda shirts (post here) that I made a few years back now.

Find the courage to try that new kind of garment to wear, as well as finding the Wonder Woman type of courage to do what is right.  Be strong.  Have compassion on yourself and others – we all need to feel awesome and cared for.  Let some of this carry over to your life and even sewing (why not?) for a truly wonder-ful result!

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Runway Relaxation

Only a fishing spot in the middle of a pond could provide such a relaxing method of modeling my casual dress on the “runway” of a boardwalk.  I just can’t help but think of songs like, “Under the Boardwalk” or “Sittin’ on the Docks of the Bay”.

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This dress does not have the best fit and is not one of my better projects (in my estimation), but I don’t care.  It’s still done well, and was a quick and fun sewing project that gives me an easy garment for lazy days and playtime.  No pressure, just pleasure – this is one project where I let my “hard-on-myself” standards go, and it really feels good.

THE FACTS:100_5406a-comp,w

FABRIC:  a lovely half rayon modal and half supima cotton blend knit. 

NOTIONS:  I already had the thread and interfacing needed, but, in lieu of buttons, I went and bought the things to add on snaps down the front placket.

PATTERN:  McCall’s 6747, year 2013

TIME TO COMPLETE:  I took a total of about 6 hours to make the dress and another two hours to install the snaps.  It was finished on June 13, 2015.

THE INSIDES:  left raw and loosely stitched together

TOTAL COST:  I didn’t care to wait to get the best price and risk losing my chance to buy the fabric.  Thus, for a total of 2 yards I spent about $12 to purchase this fabric from the now defunct Hancock Fabrics.  The snap installing pliers and necessary supplies were bought from Wal-mart for about $20, but it really free because I used a gift card to pay.

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Some words need to be said about the fabric.  A modal and cotton blend has great qualities, and is indeed lovely to wear because it has a fluid drape, like a rayon challis perhaps, but the added stability of it being a stable knit helps it keep its shape.  This particular content blend also feels so breathable, lightweight, and comfortable on the skin, that even in warmer weather, my striped placket dress still is cool to wear with its long maxi length and ¾ length sleeves.  (I also like to protect myself from the sun, too, and don’t mind covering up to do so…anything to avoid sunscreen – yuck.)  Then, in chilly weather, the fabric’s brushed feel makes it cozy, while the neutral tans and brown on the fabric work for spring and fall.

However, on the flip side to all the positives just mentioned to the fabric, but it is a bit stressful to sew.  It seems that the way the chains form into a tight knit together with the fine rayon and cotton makes for a delicate fabric which acquires holes and tears very easily.  From my experience, I notice that both 100% cotton knit and 100% rayon knit also have the tendency to be similarly delicate to sew, but combined together make for an unpredictable character under your machine needle.  I used a medium weight, knit fabrics needle for sewing my dress, and I do not think a professional might have used much else, but as it was, if the machine came down on a chain of the knit the wrong way…whoops!  Then, there’s a minutely small but still unwelcome hole.  This same thing happened, as I mentioned above, to the rayon knit of my yellow 1946 blouse and my cotton knit Doris Day 1947 blouse. Boo hoo.  Apparently, this is where a small amount of “Fray Check” liquid comes in handy if I can’t screw up my eyes for some incredibly tiny stitching.  I just can’t win ‘em all.

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I changed the layout of this pattern to accommodate the way the stripes of my fabric were laying and the fact I only had two yards.  Vertical stripes as wide as these cannot go horizontal and look good…and I wasn’t going to try and see otherwise.  Luckily my fabric was 60 inch wide and so my dress’s hem and top (shoulders and neck) were at selvedge and selvedge.  I was thrown off with the sizing of this dress being a non-number sizing, merely an extra-small, small, medium and so on.  I was in between so I went up to a small, but now I wish I would have went up another size all over, maybe more so for the sleeves.  I will have to remember this about the sizing since I want to try this pattern again for a top.  Nevertheless, I’m happy enough with how this dress turned out.  I’ve got other striped dresses and the stripes in this close fitting dress shows off body curves far more than a baggy frock would anyway.  I’ve got curves…why hide them?!

 

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This was my very first placket and I feel like I graded pretty well in my own report card.  However, the pattern’s instructions might have been better than to leave the raw edges exposed, but hey, with knits raw edges are o.k. anyway.  (My successive plackets sewn into woven fabrics all have enclosed seams.)  The placket pieces and the neckline facing were both cut out of one solid color stripe for some fun symmetry.

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Taking things to another innovative “first” for me – I did snaps!  Installing the snaps took maybe as much time as my total to make the dress itself, but since it was a quick project I wanted to spend some “extra something” to give it a special touch.  It was rather unnerving to actually go ahead and place the snaps in my good fabric of the dress because there’s no room for a major mess-up.

Not knowing where to start, I bought the only option available at the current sewing supply sources – a bench press style kit which had the pliers and a dozen lovely pearl-topped snaps.  I experimented on some scrap fabric with similar thickness as the dress’ placket and found that making snaps is hard and tricky!

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At first, we (meaning I had my hubby do the brunt of the squeezing of the press) found that not putting enough pressure into the snaps makes them not even hold together…but, we later found out (on my dress’ snaps, bummer) that too much pressure is also bad.  Squeezing the press too much smashes the snap backs to smithereens and mars the pretty pearl tops.  Apparently there is a fine line of how much pressure to apply for the perfect snaps.  A fabric store employee told me about another option – a method where you tap with a hammer twice on the snaps set in a base, more like eyelets…but I can’t do eyelets all that well on fabric (I’ve tried) so that might not work for me.  Oh well, I still like my snaps, think they will stay through wearing and washing, aaaand gives my dress a touch of ready-to-wear.  I’ve had compliments on this dress, and it’s always, “No way – you made that?!”  You bet.  This feels so darn good.

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My necklace is special to me.  Ever since my first visit as a pre-teen, I’ve loved the “Gem and Mineral” shows and exhibitions which go on in our town, where you can find out about the rocks and geology of our earth.  There I can just look and learn but also buy amazing, special, related items at reasonable prices, as they are coming from the vendors who make and/or source the gifts.  My all-time favorite gemstone is malachite, the first in my rock collection.  Finally, I recently bought myself a jewelry piece of it…the heart shaped pendant you see in my pictures.

100_5585-compWhat would a fishing pond be without duck bottoms!?  Aren’t they cute!  A family of ‘quackers’ were piddling around me during the photo shoot and the little ones kept dunking for a meal, entertaining me.  Hopefully the duck parents don’t mind me sharing a picture of their kids’ rears.  Nature can be so relaxing – helped out, too, by a carefree handmade dress to make one feel wonderful!

Basic is Beautiful

Don’t you just hate it when a longtime favorite and much loved wardrobe staple of yours gives up its ghost?  Yeah, always a bummer!  My decade and a half staple – a bohemian-style, maxi length, lightweight denim skirt – ripped apart from too much love.  Well, for someone who sews all chances of having a replacement is not entirely lost.

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It took me two years to find the right pattern and fabric to finally have a lovely replacement that I love almost just as much as my original – this is saying a lot!  Sure, I had plans to make a pattern from my old favorite but I realized it might not be a bad thing to move on with my style and try something similar yet different at the same time.  Also, because one basic staple deserves another, I have my new denim skirt paired with a slightly seductive, vintage, knit white tee for another wardrobe filler.  I’m hoping my set has a slight nod to the 1970s era yet still stays modern.  To have a garment be an indispensable staple piece, yet also vintage and modern, is the best combo ever for those days when I want to blend in yet still wear styles which pay tribute to the past.

Every time I make something really needed and purposeful (not just what tickles my fancy), I realize how beautiful sewing the basics can be.  This is why my outfit (specifically my skirt) is part of the Petite Passions’ Wardrobe Builder Project for the month of May. As you can see, it is helping me get the motivation to build on my everyday casual wardrobe!

THE FACTS:McCall's 6623, year 1979-comp,w

FABRIC:  Skirt – 2 yards of a lightweight, light wash, denim chambray with scrap Kona cotton for the waistband lining; Top – less than one yard of a ribbed cotton knit

PATTERNS:  Skirt – Burda Style “Tiered Denim Maxi Skirt” #102 B, from April 2017;  Top – McCall’s #6623, year 1979

Tiered Denim Maxi Skirt 04-2017 #102BNOTIONS:  Besides the invisible zipper, which I bought because I don’t necessarily keep ‘specialty’ zips on hand, everything else needed was basic (thread, interfacing, bias tape) and came from on hand.

TIME TO COMPLETE:  The top was sewn a while back now, finished on August 24, 2015 after only 3 hours’ time.  The skirt took me about 5 hours to make and was finished on May 16, 2017.

DSC_0416a-comp,wTHE INSIDES:  My skirt is all clean inside with both French seams and bias tape while my knit top is raw edged inside (as it doesn’t fray).

TOTAL COST:  The top’s ribbed fabric was a miserable little scrap remnant – technically it was about one yard but was badly hacked into with all the corners squarely cut off.  See below the “tight squeeze” to fit the pattern pieces on it.  The knit was bought for about $2 when Hancock Fabrics was closing.  The denim was bought the year before from Jo Ann’s Fabric store for about $9 (more or less I don’t remember).  I suppose my outfit is about $12 but priceless in utility to me!    

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Now, as for any Burda Style pattern, printing and/or tracing is necessary to have a usable pattern to lay on your desired fabric.  My pattern was traced from the downloaded and assembled PDF bought at the online store but if you have a magazine issue, use a roll of medical paper to trace your pieces from the insert sheet.  It’s at this preliminary step that you pick out your proper size and add in your choice of seam allowance width.  A scissor with a magnetic ruler guide helps immensely to quicken along the step to getting a finished pattern prepped.  Sorry to repeat something you might already know, but this is just an “FYI” for those that don’t know.

There were only subtle changes that I made to the skirt for my version.  The main change, to lessen the gathers of the lower panel, was part taste.  I planned on doing that anyway, but the amount of the gathers was dictated by the fact I was working with only 2 yards of material while using a pattern calling for at least 3 yards.  I am a smaller woman, and on the edge of being petite height, so I figured such a full maxi skirt as the original design might be a bad idea.  I really do like the skirt fullness as it is now even if I did not get to choose exactly how I wanted it.  Sometimes “making do” works better than trying to start from scratch to be ‘perfect’.

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Other than changing the amount of gathers, I sewed the gathers onto the upper skirt piece like a normal seam rather than top-stitching on like the pattern called for.  This top-stitched panel would’ve created a frilly ruffle where the two panels came together.  I was decreasing the gathers for a slimmer skirt and a frill through the middle of a half-gathered panel would have messed with the silhouette.  This regular seaming also saved me the trouble of finishing the one edge of the gathered panel so I could equalize my time spent to invisibly hand-stitch down the hem.

I already took out 3 inches from the overall length but my hem even still became a wide 3 ½ inches.  This baby runs very long as if it is a “Tall” sized pattern.  It does sit on the hips, with the top of the skirt riding just below my true waist.  As one who wears a lot of vintage, which almost always has a high-to–true waist, I still like this feature which is more modern, it’s just a change for me (not a bad thing, as I said above).

DSC_0404a-comp,wAs I went through the extra effort to make no stitching visible, under stitching the facing at the waist and having a hand-done hem, I figured an invisible zipper here was the only way to go.  After having my last invisible zipper failing on me and trapping me in my dress back in 2012 (post on that here), I have taken a long hiatus from this specific notion but coming back to it has been a refreshing and rewarding success.  I love how you don’t see anything but the zipper pull…but, yes, I realize that’s why they are called invisible!

My top is the third time I have used McCall’s #6623 pattern – this is unprecedented for me!  (Here are my first and my second versions of this pattern.)  I still yet want to have the gumption to make and wear that strappy cold-shoulder version.  The tank is so lovely and basic I need to make a few of those in some basic colors.  For some reason I really love this one pattern, and it loves me by the way it fits me so darn well.

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I find this pattern interestingly unique, not just from the fact that each view top has its own pieces (none shared), but because of the small “From a Norton Simon Inc. Company” logo next to the McCall’s logo.  This pattern’s year, 1969, was a decade after Norton Simon himself retired from active involvement in his business.  What’s up with that?!

McCall's 6623, year 1979-comp,zoomNot too many people know that Norton Simon, the smart art collector and businessman behind Max Factor cosmetics, Avis Car Rental, and Canada Dry Corporation (to name a few), also controlled the McCall Corporation and all its publishing (magazines and such) between 1959 and 1969.  How I have not heard of this man, who seemed to have an influence in so much of the companies and products that are a part of our modern lives, before recently?  He was on the cover page of TIME magazine on June 4, 1965, in People magazine (1976), and even ran for the United States Senate (in 1970).  His conglomerate is now ranked 112th on FORTUNE’S list of the 500 largest American corporations    I wonder why this is the only McCall pattern I have seen with his naming rights on it.  See – patterns are so interesting in so many ways!

Sewing this top was super simple and easy.  This is the first time I have used this pattern un-altered.  I did have to add in snap on lingerie straps made from ribbon to anchor the shoulder to my underwear.  Otherwise the shoulders on this open-back hottie piece slide a bit all over the place.  Basic bias tape adds a bit of soft shaping and contrast finishing for the neck edges, and a little left chest pockets adds some small utilitarian interest.

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My biggest setback was working with the rib knit – a very first for me to work with.  I thought I had this pattern understood but not this time.  I had to sew the side seams several inches smaller than normal to accommodate the give of the ribbing.  It acts like a slinky toy!  It was a tough call to figure out the sweet spot between too loose of a fit and too snug.  I didn’t want the rib knit to lose its design when fitting over me yet I wanted it to be body complimentary without being a second skin.  After several stitchings, un-pickings, and re-stitching spells I like the balance I found.  This top does look so hilariously small on the hangar – the ribbing springs back so it seems like something for a 10 year old girl.  It also is best dried flat after washing.  The weirdness of the rib knit also meant all my hems are unfinished – not by choice but at least I think the raw edges look good on this occasion.  This quirky material has a definite personality!  Working with it was a definite learning curve.

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Between all the challenging and involved projects that I want to make (from my too numerous ideas), sewing basic necessities always is a pain to get around to.  Who completely wants to sew something merely because you need it, when nowadays ‘stuff’ is so easy and available to buy?  And yet, such sewing also always ends up so satisfying for me and it always amazes me.  The staple clothing necessities that you reach for everyday can be an uncommon source of creative pride and possess better individual style if you don’t exclude them from receiving the personal touch of hand sewing.  I’m practicing what I preach lately by giving away a good amount of the ready-to-wear that I do not like or use so that my ‘me-makes’ and my vintage pieces can take over my wardrobe.

Do you make your tees, and jeans, and anything else basic?  If yes, do you like them better than the ready-to-wear option?  Have you ever worked on sewing up a replacement for an old favorite garment?  Is sewing what you need something that you have a love or a hate attitude towards? Maybe, like me, you feel a bit of both?  What is your experience (if you have one) with rib knits?  One last query – has anyone else seen a McCall’s pattern with a “Norton Simon” logo?  If you have any feedback for these questions, please do share – I like to ‘hear’ what you have to say!  As always, thanks for reading.

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