A Duo of Handsome Wing Collar Shirts

…for two handsome guys – my dad and my husband!  It does come in handy for me when their presents are garments that both men are almost exact in body type…and therefore size, too.  Thus when it came time to figure out gifts for them last year, I sewed up two shirts from the same vintage pattern, but choose two different fabrics and prints to accommodate for personal taste.  There isn’t anything like a custom, personalized gift to make someone’s day, and I love doing that for people as special as both my dad and my hubby.

What I used here was a ‘tried-and-true’ pattern that has previously helped me sew this unusual shirt for my hubby, a Butterick #7673 from 1956 (see facts below for a picture).  This time I used the second, completely different view which has something called a “wing collar”.  The collar is a wonderful kind of subtle different, yet I LOVE how its ‘wing’ name coincides all too well with the kind of shirt I made for my dad in particular…

DSC_0337a-comp,w

Out of the wide and varied store of awesome knowledge that my father has in his head, he is amazing when it comes to World War II airplane history.  He had previously raved to me about a co-worker of his that had such an impressive plane print shirt, so he himself gave me the idea.  I set about to comb the internet and after an exhaustive, long drawn out search, I found the one perfect print that screams “Him” to me, and boy – I found it!  His shirt is a cotton print which combines his expertise in camouflage prints with his knowledge of WWII planes.  The aerial view of the ground, in brown tones, looks like a camouflage when you focus on the planes, which are all-American, like us!  My dad (and I, too) love, love the mix of bomber and fighter planes so much so that we are frequently caught looking down at his shirt when he wears this!  Distracted much?  The basic, soft cotton of his shirt makes it very ‘everyday wearable’ for him, and the print can definitely a conversation piece for him – something he can all-around enjoy!

DSC_0338a-comp,w,combo

I am completely tickled by the close matching down the front of the shirt where it buttons.  Whether you believe me or not, the matching was a lucky surprise.  You see, I figured I wouldn’t be able to pull a full match off without blowing my brains, so I didn’t try, but it still happened anyway!  I did meticulously match up the left chest pocket, so that it is nearly invisible.  Finally, I added a cloth “made with love” label inside for a true gift message, too!

DSC_0570,p,a-comp,w

My thought process and motivation behind making hubby’s shirt was different than my dad’s, but similar in the whole “gift” idea.  You see, ever since my first few dresses inspired by the Marvel television series Agent Carter, he started bugging me with hints about something for him inspired by the same show.  He’d remind me that if I’m going to be Peggy Carter, there should be an Agent Sousa (her romantic interest), and who better for role that than him?!  Well, yes, (I’d roll my eyes and sigh), I suppose.  Being set in California post WWII, Agent Sousa often wore Hawaiian print casual shirts, and as that was something my hubby certainly did not possess, the ‘vacation-time to relax’ vibe of a tropical shirt is what I wanted to channel.  I wanted to not just give him a new shirt, in a new style and print, but also lend the shirt itself a relaxed ‘feel’.  I did all of that by choosing a new-to-him fabric to enjoy which would dress up his casual shirt – rayon challis, my own favorite!

Now, as this was to be his shirt, I let him be the one to pick out the print.  I found a bunch available online and both he and I were undecided about two, so we bought both!  He preferred a rich orange background tropical print rayon (bought from this shop), with Agent Sousa in tropical shirtHawaiian and bird of paradise flowers spread out in a large scale.  He also liked (but I preferred) a print closer to a shirt worn by Agent Sousa, one that seems more ‘California’ to me – the one you see in this post.  I love the rough, tree bark effect of the background and two colors of palm tree silhouettes.  He will still get the other Hawaiian print sewn into a shirt soon enough, but for now he is happy with the one that makes him more like Agent Sousa, and one that we both picked out!  Besides, there was enough leftover of this tree bark-palm tree print rayon to actually made myself a sort of matching, summer, 50’s blouse, too.  Granted we haven’t yet wore our tops in the same fabric at the same time…but it still is kind of cute to know I made a ‘his’ and a ‘hers’ version.DSC_0580a-comp,w

What I’d like to point out is that this men’s shirt design is also unusual in the way it has no shoulder placket.  The back is one full piece, with no darts, tucks, or pleats of any kind, and it extends all the way up to the center top shoulder seam.  How easy and simple can you get?  That’s what makes this design of shirt just perfect for novelty prints, in my opinion.  Not that style lines are bad, but in this case they do not get in the way of the fabric prints and make complex matching one of the last things to concern yourself about.  Between the back and the simple, faced, all-in-one “wing” collar, this is a very easy and quick pattern to sew.

DSC_0579a-comp,wBoth shirts were cut out the same, like an assembly line, except for two small tailoring points.  My dad has smaller shoulders and is shorter in height than my husband, so the length I added to hubby’s shirt was taken out as well as the extra 5/8 to extend the shoulder width.  Any other differences had to do with the material and how it needed to be treated.  My dad’s shirt, being cotton, got flat-felled seams and a bias bound, shirt-waist style hem.  Hubby’s shirt, being a slinky rayon, received French seams, and a tiny ¼ hem around the straight edge bottom.  My dad’s shirt buttons match the background of his cotton print – they are basic and two-toned brown.  My husband’s shirt buttons are rather nice, pearlescent basic shirt buttons for a slight, but not flashy, contrast.  As suits a vintage shirt, all the buttons are vintage, or at least retro, from the stash of hubby’s Grandmother.

I like how this post presents a good example of how the choice of fabric dramatically changes a design.  (McCall’s Corporation just presented and example of this on Instagram.)  It is the same for all patterns – the choice of texture, color, and ‘hand’ of a material all makes important variations.  Sometimes these variations can be a surprise or planned depending on whether or not you are working with a fabric that is new to you or one that is akin to a well-known friend.  Either way, sewing offers endless opportunities for creative fun and expression starting at the fabric level!

DSC_0583a-comp,combo

Men, at least the one’s I know, are so hard to be models!  My husband is not comfortable being pointed at by a camera, but he did his best for me here for this post and accommodates his seamstress like a good man.  I didn’t even bother to ask my dad because I know him and didn’t even want to try and convince him, too.  Believe me, though – my dad’s shirt stands perky (keeps its own shape) and is awesome against his darker skin tone, suiting him well.  One model is enough, because anyway…these shirts look even better in person.

This men’s vintage pattern NEEDS to be reprinted (hint, hint McCall corporation).  If I knew how to make this happen, I would.  Out of all the patterns I’ve come across, I am never more serious than about this one.  For those who sew, these shirts are fun to make because they are creative, incredibly easy, and a nice change from the traditional collars and plackets.  For the guys who would only be on the receiving end, this is the kind of shirt where you will feel special in it, and if you hang around one person for about 5 to 10 minutes length of time, you will get a curious, interested question about your collar.  Then comes the time to do the seamstress a favor in return as part of your answer!  It’s a win-win all around.100_6215a-comp,w

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  Plane shirt – a quilting 100% cotton; Hawaiian shirt – a 100% rayon challis

PATTERN:  Butterick #7673, year 1956

NOTIONS:  Nothing but thread, bias tape, interfacing, and buttons were needed, and I always have this stuff on hand!

TIME TO COMPLETE:  Each shirt took me only 4 hours to whip up, and both were finished up about August 23, 2016.

DSC_0340-comp,wTHE INSIDES:  French seams for the inside of the rayon shirt and a combo of flat felled and bias bound seams are inside the cotton one.

TOTAL COST:  The plane print cotton was bought off of Ebay and more than what I normally spend or even would like, but as it was for a present I felt it was worth it to get something so appropriate for someone.  The two yards of rayon for the Hawaiian shirt came from “Simply Fabric of Oakland” (see it here, if you want to buy some, too) and is lovelier than the normal Jo Ann’s store rayon – very silky with a slight sheen.  So pleased with my present purchases, I’m not really counting!  

Modern Delineator Girl

What happens when I want to imitate the cover of a vintage Delineator magazine I own, but I only have one measly yard of matching fabric to work with?  This…I become a modernly basic version of a year 1931 Delineator girl.

Delineator 1931, front cover-comp,w, & my tank dress pic

I’ve made vintage fashion up-to-date before, but never to this point.  I’ve also never used stripes in the sometimes uncomplimentary horizontal direction before, and I am still being won over to the result.  Nevertheless, this is comfy to wear, cool for summer, and as easy to sew up as it is to accessorize.

DSC_0856a-comp,wThis dress was made so I could have a patriotic set for Independence Day as part of the “4th of July Proud Dress Project” sponsored by the blog “Akram’s Ideas”.   It was worn with my handmade necklace of Lapis Lazuli beads, blue sapphire earrings, and my own navy nail art for a full American color combo – complete with sun hat!  Unfortunately, temperatures were lower than normal and a bit too chilly for me to be completely comfortable in my dress for long, so I’m looking forward to much more use of this once the full heat of summer kicks in here…especially for those dash out of the house errands or after school pick-up occasions!

THE FACTS:McCall's 6559, tank dresses with cardigan

FABRIC:  The red and white striped fabric is a lovely 100% rayon knit; the lining is an ultra-lightweight polyester interlock in white

PATTERN:  McCall’s 6559

NOTIONS:  Nothing but white thread was needed, and of course I have plenty of that!

THE INSIDES:  Pretty nice for a knit dress – as this dress is fully lined (yes!), all the seams are covered except for the raw edges of the bias binding around DSC_0859a-comp,wthe arm openings and the neckline

TIME TO COMPLETE:  The dress was finished on June 22, 2017 after only 4 or 5 hours. 

TOTAL COST:  The striped rayon knit was a folded up remnant, not even on a bolt, bought when Hancock Fabrics was going out of business.  Thus, I believe I bought this for about $2.  The interlock is something I have a stash of on hand, so I’m counting it as free making this one awesomely low cost yet high quality dress!

Rayon is my ultimate favorite fabric.  When it comes to a rayon knit, there isn’t anything more dreamy and luxurious to me.  Nevertheless, rayon knit is terribly thin and delicate.  Thus I figured my striped fabric, being a rayon knit, needed a lining if it was to be DSC_0860-comp,wpractical and wearable for me.  Giving this tank dress a full body lining eliminates any see-through issues, feels wonderful on the inside with no seam allowances rubbing, makes my dress a total step above any store bought tank dress, and helps keep the rayon dress in its proper shape.  It was a win-win all around, especially since I used the lining to even cover up the hem, doing a hand-stitched finish to “make-up” for the rest of the dress’ simple design and ease in sewing.

I have long been wanting to use this tank dress pattern and it pretty much sewed up to my high expectations.  The fit is nice only because this dress’ pattern seems to run generous and I had to take it in by an extra inch or two to get a loosely close shape.  The length was dictated by the amount of fabric available (not much – a 55 by 30 inch square) and so it is a tad shorter than I would like.  The bias binding on the armholes and neckline is interesting and was an easy and conventional means of finishing off the edges.  Somehow, though, I wish I would have made it skinnier (that is, less noticeable) as well as sewing them so that they covered up the seam allowance from the inside.  However, it works, and as I didn’t want to spend too much time working on such a basic dress, I’m happy with it how it is.

DSC_0828a-comp,w

I did choose the racer-back option, but for some reason I do not think it turned out quite as it should have.  The racer-back ends up looking (to me) like a half-hearted attempt and not a full, shoulder blade baring style as I expected.  I left the dress’ bodice back as it was because I do like the fact I do not have to adjust or change my lingerie strap configuration, as I would have had to do for a true racer-back.  However, I think it makes me seem like I have swimmer’s shoulders from behind.  I don’t swim, and although my shoulders are my strong point, I feel they are big enough and am sensitive about emphasizing them like this.  Sorry, off topic!  My point is, if you do want the full racer back to this pattern, I think you will have to do some re-cutting first.

DSC_0838a-comp,w

Here’s yet another good example of what can be done with only a yard of fabric and a vintage inspiration.  Not too often do modern patterns seem to lend themselves to being a one yard friendly project – sometimes I wonder if they’re in bed with the fabric companies.  That compatibility with small cuts of material is usually something I see provided through vintage patterns.  However, I hope this dress project of mine inspires you to keep your eyes open for both old and new opportunities to use those discounted small cuts, those remnants taking up room in your stash, or those pretty fabrics of second-hand clothing you no longer fit in.  Open them up and start experimenting with the layout of some pattern pieces and you might be surprised!

Also, just because a vintage garment or image inspires you doesn’t mean it has to translate into something old-fashioned…like my tank dress, your garment can be whatever you want it to be, for whatever occasion or era you would like!  Keep being inspired and creative out there, dear readers, and happy sewing!

Runway Relaxation

Only a fishing spot in the middle of a pond could provide such a relaxing method of modeling my casual dress on the “runway” of a boardwalk.  I just can’t help but think of songs like, “Under the Boardwalk” or “Sittin’ on the Docks of the Bay”.

100_5580a-comp,w

This dress does not have the best fit and is not one of my better projects (in my estimation), but I don’t care.  It’s still done well, and was a quick and fun sewing project that gives me an easy garment for lazy days and playtime.  No pressure, just pleasure – this is one project where I let my “hard-on-myself” standards go, and it really feels good.

THE FACTS:100_5406a-comp,w

FABRIC:  a lovely half rayon modal and half supima cotton blend knit. 

NOTIONS:  I already had the thread and interfacing needed, but, in lieu of buttons, I went and bought the things to add on snaps down the front placket.

PATTERN:  McCall’s 6747, year 2013

TIME TO COMPLETE:  I took a total of about 6 hours to make the dress and another two hours to install the snaps.  It was finished on June 13, 2015.

THE INSIDES:  left raw and loosely stitched together

TOTAL COST:  I didn’t care to wait to get the best price and risk losing my chance to buy the fabric.  Thus, for a total of 2 yards I spent about $12 to purchase this fabric from the now defunct Hancock Fabrics.  The snap installing pliers and necessary supplies were bought from Wal-mart for about $20, but it really free because I used a gift card to pay.

100_5561,p-comp,w

Some words need to be said about the fabric.  A modal and cotton blend has great qualities, and is indeed lovely to wear because it has a fluid drape, like a rayon challis perhaps, but the added stability of it being a stable knit helps it keep its shape.  This particular content blend also feels so breathable, lightweight, and comfortable on the skin, that even in warmer weather, my striped placket dress still is cool to wear with its long maxi length and ¾ length sleeves.  (I also like to protect myself from the sun, too, and don’t mind covering up to do so…anything to avoid sunscreen – yuck.)  Then, in chilly weather, the fabric’s brushed feel makes it cozy, while the neutral tans and brown on the fabric work for spring and fall.

However, on the flip side to all the positives just mentioned to the fabric, but it is a bit stressful to sew.  It seems that the way the chains form into a tight knit together with the fine rayon and cotton makes for a delicate fabric which acquires holes and tears very easily.  From my experience, I notice that both 100% cotton knit and 100% rayon knit also have the tendency to be similarly delicate to sew, but combined together make for an unpredictable character under your machine needle.  I used a medium weight, knit fabrics needle for sewing my dress, and I do not think a professional might have used much else, but as it was, if the machine came down on a chain of the knit the wrong way…whoops!  Then, there’s a minutely small but still unwelcome hole.  This same thing happened, as I mentioned above, to the rayon knit of my yellow 1946 blouse and my cotton knit Doris Day 1947 blouse. Boo hoo.  Apparently, this is where a small amount of “Fray Check” liquid comes in handy if I can’t screw up my eyes for some incredibly tiny stitching.  I just can’t win ‘em all.

100_5279-comp,w

I changed the layout of this pattern to accommodate the way the stripes of my fabric were laying and the fact I only had two yards.  Vertical stripes as wide as these cannot go horizontal and look good…and I wasn’t going to try and see otherwise.  Luckily my fabric was 60 inch wide and so my dress’s hem and top (shoulders and neck) were at selvedge and selvedge.  I was thrown off with the sizing of this dress being a non-number sizing, merely an extra-small, small, medium and so on.  I was in between so I went up to a small, but now I wish I would have went up another size all over, maybe more so for the sleeves.  I will have to remember this about the sizing since I want to try this pattern again for a top.  Nevertheless, I’m happy enough with how this dress turned out.  I’ve got other striped dresses and the stripes in this close fitting dress shows off body curves far more than a baggy frock would anyway.  I’ve got curves…why hide them?!

 

100_5569a-comp,w

This was my very first placket and I feel like I graded pretty well in my own report card.  However, the pattern’s instructions might have been better than to leave the raw edges exposed, but hey, with knits raw edges are o.k. anyway.  (My successive plackets sewn into woven fabrics all have enclosed seams.)  The placket pieces and the neckline facing were both cut out of one solid color stripe for some fun symmetry.

100_5403a-comp,w,combo

Taking things to another innovative “first” for me – I did snaps!  Installing the snaps took maybe as much time as my total to make the dress itself, but since it was a quick project I wanted to spend some “extra something” to give it a special touch.  It was rather unnerving to actually go ahead and place the snaps in my good fabric of the dress because there’s no room for a major mess-up.

Not knowing where to start, I bought the only option available at the current sewing supply sources – a bench press style kit which had the pliers and a dozen lovely pearl-topped snaps.  I experimented on some scrap fabric with similar thickness as the dress’ placket and found that making snaps is hard and tricky!

100_5550-comp,w

At first, we (meaning I had my hubby do the brunt of the squeezing of the press) found that not putting enough pressure into the snaps makes them not even hold together…but, we later found out (on my dress’ snaps, bummer) that too much pressure is also bad.  Squeezing the press too much smashes the snap backs to smithereens and mars the pretty pearl tops.  Apparently there is a fine line of how much pressure to apply for the perfect snaps.  A fabric store employee told me about another option – a method where you tap with a hammer twice on the snaps set in a base, more like eyelets…but I can’t do eyelets all that well on fabric (I’ve tried) so that might not work for me.  Oh well, I still like my snaps, think they will stay through wearing and washing, aaaand gives my dress a touch of ready-to-wear.  I’ve had compliments on this dress, and it’s always, “No way – you made that?!”  You bet.  This feels so darn good.

100_5557a-comp,w

My necklace is special to me.  Ever since my first visit as a pre-teen, I’ve loved the “Gem and Mineral” shows and exhibitions which go on in our town, where you can find out about the rocks and geology of our earth.  There I can just look and learn but also buy amazing, special, related items at reasonable prices, as they are coming from the vendors who make and/or source the gifts.  My all-time favorite gemstone is malachite, the first in my rock collection.  Finally, I recently bought myself a jewelry piece of it…the heart shaped pendant you see in my pictures.

100_5585-compWhat would a fishing pond be without duck bottoms!?  Aren’t they cute!  A family of ‘quackers’ were piddling around me during the photo shoot and the little ones kept dunking for a meal, entertaining me.  Hopefully the duck parents don’t mind me sharing a picture of their kids’ rears.  Nature can be so relaxing – helped out, too, by a carefree handmade dress to make one feel wonderful!

Water Nymph

The month of April is synonymous with being wet from spring showers.  The month also frequently hosts the holiday of Easter as well.  I think I’ll just be ‘one’ with it all!

DSC_0025-comp,w

To me, there is almost nothing that equals the calming noise, relaxing loveliness, and happy beauty of being at a woodland pond and trickling creek.  Top this off with a perfect spring afternoon and Eastertime – and we couldn’t ask for a better place to hang out, do some weekend recuperating, and take some photos of my newest dress.  It is made from a simple pattern at the heart of the “Flower Child” era, 1969, and has a water-marked sort of faded tie-dye knit to match.  My inner “nature goddess” needed a self-made lilac flower crown to complete the whole ensemble!  However, for some of my pictures later on you’ll see me stripped of the sash belt, flower crown, and even shoes to go more ‘natural’…

I see pastels everywhere (fashion-wise) this season, and I am not one to purposefully follow trends, but the new, rayon-based, super-soft knits at my local fabric store tempted me, too much.  They also happen to be a designer line!  Now I can be on trend, yet still sneak in my vintage love with this dress, he he.  Vogue 7463, late 1968 or early 1969

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  a Kathy Davis Designer brand knit “Eraser Purple”- 97% Rayon 3% Spandex knit.

PATTERN: a Vogue #7463, from either late 1968 or early 1969

NOTIONS:  nothing but thread and two small strips of interfacing were needed –simple!

TIME TO COMPLETE:  the dress was finished on April 1 (2016) after about 8 hours spent to make it up.

TOTAL COST:  This fabric was a very recent purchase from my local Jo Ann’s fabric store.  I spent about $18 for two yards…a bit more than what I’m used to spending but worth it for a designer printed dress like this one!

This garment is part of two sewing challenges actually – the “Wardrobe Builder” dress project for April as well as the “Easter-Spring Dress” sew-a-long.  It is part of the “Wardrobe Builder” project because firstly, it is a dress, plus being one that is so very practical yet dressy at the same time.  This combo should make this a nice go-to for early spring, especially since it has long sleeves to keep me warm enough through the chilliness we so frequently have through the season.  My dress is part of the “Easter-Spring Dress” sew-a-long because of the obvious…it is perfect for spring and was specifically made to wear on Palm Sunday. This is part one of two dresses for this sew-a-long.

DSC_0031a-comp,w

Only because the design was so simple was I able to plan for two new garments for Easter time!  Although it is simple, the design is first class.  The instructions were very complicated for what one would think looking at the cover envelope picture and design lines of the dress.  The instructions were meant for a fully lined dress with fancy tailoring and made of a flowing woven as suggested by pattern back.  My own dress was much simplified, mostly due to the fact it’s merely made from a single layer of a drapey knit with no seam edge finishing.  I’ll admit I am not used to working with true vintage Vogue patterns – maybe such thorough instructions, fine designs, and nice details are the norm of all their offerings, whatever era they come from.  I do generally love the modern “Vintage Vogue” line of patterns for those same features.  Maybe, I just have a new ‘need’ to find and make some more old Vogue patterns!DSC_0036-comp,w

The rayon knit has a shifty, heavy drape so the wide bateau neckline, which is the highlight of the dress, needed to be interfaced.  I used a stiff, sew-in mid weight interfacing attached to just the one-piece, self-facing which gets turned inside the neckline.  However, the rest of the dress was left without anything to stabilize the seams and this seems to work out fine, but I still am not sure.  Was I supposed to add in seam tape to the long French bust darts, at least – or maybe to the side seams, too?  I didn’t.  The dress seems slightly generous in fit the way and I supposed it was because of the nature fabric but I don’t mind – it only adds to the comfort of wearing it.  However, I do have a very strong suspicion that this dress will “grow” after every wash, the fabric getting slightly bigger and out of shape.  That’s why they added in spandex to the rayon, to prevent this, so I shouldn’t be suspect.  So…for now I’m happy with it the way it is and if it does “grow” on me the more I wash and wear DSC_0047-comp,wit, I suppose I’ll either take it in or/and add on the seam tape then.

Only minor adjustment were made – to lengthen the dress hem and sleeve length by one inch.  I like this length of the dress (and it has a 2 inch hem) but the sleeves took about a 4 ½ inch hem to get them to the length they are and they are still a tad long.  Other than the fact that the sleeve armpit seam dips rather low for my preference and I raised by just under and inch, this dress was straightforward to make.

My floral crown was made from artificial lilac stems bought at the dollar store, carefully layered and wrapped around a band of floral wire with floral tape.  This coronet only cost $1 and I’m so pleased I could spend so little to come up with something every bit as lovely as I had hoped.  I would totally wear this out much more than I will, in fact – boo hoo.  It is so fun!  Hubby lets me do my own thing with my projects and outfits, but this floral crown makes him sigh and roll his eyes at me…really?!  Yes, really – it is awesome to wear just what I want and frolic in a lovely flower crown, just because I came up with an idea and was able to make something of it.  Luckily, previous experience from briefly working at a floral shop came in handy here…

DSC_0048-comp,w

I do have to laugh at myself that I sew with a non-floral fabric and have it in my mind that it is inspired by nature.  It figures!  Oh well – after spending the week before at home being sick, this outfit gave me the prod I needed to get out and enjoy my favorite part of the outdoors.  Inspiration is everywhere.

For more pictures of my ‘frolicking’ through nature in this outfit check out my Instagram!

Save

“1938 Goes Native” Dress

Hot weather and bright sunshine gives me no excuse to look any less cool and elegant with my year 1938 dress creation.  Now I also have a frock for the upcoming fall weather, as well.  The neutral tones work perfectly with blazers and cardigans for cooler temperatures.  Yay for multi-season sewing!

dsc_0544-comp-w

As my dress is made of lovely rayon challis, the drapey, loose bodice is actually cooling and the high neck feels like I’m wearing a soft ascot to catch the extra sweat at my neck.  For the cool temperatures, the neck will keep me cozy.  The bias skirt is not at all restricting, moving with me at every step making me aware of the understated elegance of pre-War 30’s styling.

I am writing this post thanks to the help of another blogger, the awesome Emileigh at “Flashback Summer”.  When I had a question about my dress, I couldn’t think of anyone better at addressing cultural influences and its history, especially when it comes to being part of vintage fashion.  Thus, at my sending a query, she helped me recognize the Native American flair to my chosen fabric, seeing the geometric jagged triangle/diamond shapes and color scheme.  She recommended this site to see the similarities.

THE FACTS:100_4454acombo-comp-w

FABRIC:  a 100% rayon challis

PATTERN:  McCall #3061, stamped December 5, 1938, for the bodice and a mid-30’s (probably 1935) New York #531 for the skirt portion

NOTIONS:  I had all the thread needed, as well as the side closing notions, then I used vintage 100% cotton bias tape which had been given me by my Grandmother.  The single back neck closing button is a wood-looking plastic coming from the stash of my hubby’s Grandmother.

dsc_0585-compTIME TO COMPLETE:  This was whipped up in about 3 or 4 hours and finished on May 10, 2016

THE INSIDES:  All either French or bias bound

TOTAL COST:  The 2 ½ yards I used were bought at Hancock as it was closing, so I got a good deal – maybe a total of $10.

Now, just to clarify, I am not attempting to knock-off something designated as special to this race, like how Pendleton has lately been misusing the Native Americans “trade blankets” and Navajo prints.   I am merely trying to highlight and recognize the beauty and art of another culture through fabric, as well as taking this as an opportunity to learn about the past.

dsc_0553-comp-w

In 1930’s and the 1940’s, Native Americans were still not represented well at all…even though more than 44,000 saw service on all fronts.  However, by the late 30’s things were taking a good turn.  1938 –the date of my dress – was the year the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) estimated the number of potential registrants for a draft in case of war (Hitler was then occupying Austria and Czechoslovakia).  The Navajos especially answered the call inwearing-navajo-blankets-1930s-estatesaletreasurehunter-blogspot force, with many of those enlisting seeing a big city for the very first time and many being in their early teens posing as older young men.  About 400 Navajos were chosen for a special WWII code unit (in 1942) to develop secret messaging for use on the Pacific front, offering the U.S. a code which could not be broken.  On a more personal level, 1938 was also the beginning of the first established high schools and centers for education on reservations, to bring more progressive and wide spread learning sponsored by the BIA (Bureau of Indian Affairs).  Previously, the “Indian New Deal” of the Depression played down schools and learning for this race.  The Indian division of the CCC was building more community buildings, lands were being granted back in 1938 and ’37, natural resources on their lands were protected by the “Mining Act”, and Anglo writers were transcribing oral tradition into written form.  No group that participated in World War II made a greater per capita contribution than Native Americans, and between this fact and changing attitudes, the time period before and after 1938 was one of significance for these people.  I would like to recognize this and let my dress do the extra showing of respect.

dsc_0557a-comp-w

This dress’ design is stunningly complicated in appearance but ridiculously simple to construct.  No kidding – it’s like the magically appearing pattern…only four pieces for my dress and 4 hours later…a dress!  This pattern has one basic body design, but there are three sleeve options and the ¾ sleeve is by far my favorite.  I meant to do the short sleeves but they seemed to overwhelming to the dress so were left off.  The pattern I have was bought at a very reasonable price because it was missing the skirt pattern pieces but no biggie – this basic shape is on a pattern I already have used (not posted yet), New York #531.  All the details are in the bodice and sleeves anyway.dsc_0586a-comp-w

The side closing here is one of its kind in my wardrobe.  It is a combo of both a zipper and a snap closure to not constrict the silhouette of the dress.  From the waist down there is a zipper, sort of a hard thing in a bias skirt, and from the waist up is a snap closure to keep the bodice draping well.  This was kind of tricky to finagle, but it gave me the opportunity to use up two small remnant pieces of snap tape floating around in my “scrap notions” drawer!

My biggest fear with this dress was being sewn from a print might make the bodice details disappear, but I figured (I think correctly) that a larger, especially geometric pattern would show best what is going on at the shoulders with the triple rows of uber-ruching.  I cannot wait to make another, dressier version of this dress out of a rich, deep colored solid jersey rayon.  For now, I am quite happy to have a vintage dress that is so versatile and comfy, as well as a tribute to the history of America’s “first citizens”.

dsc_0555-comppw