Netted Satin Tilt Hat

Thank you everyone for the wonderful comments recently!

Ah yes, I did not forget – I had promised in the previous post to go on about more than just my 1943 dress!Burda Style sept 2011 DIY hat ideas

My hat was a ridiculously easy project, coming from a page of Burda Style’s September 2011 magazine.  They issued an article on “do-it-yourself” hats like from the royal wedding earlier that year, and I used the basic idea given there and ran with it.  After tiring myself out looking at so many inspiration pictures of original extant small tilt hats (see this page for one of my sources), I decided they all pretty much had a few things in common – small enough to show off a hairstyle, a little bit of quirkiness, and lots of over the top decoration, whether it be birds or flowers and especially netting.

100_6270-compBurda’s page recommended starting with an almond shape, oval and pointy, with several possible styling options shown.  So, I drafted my own from an 8 ½ by 11 inch piece of paper, with the oblong going cross-ways from one top corner to the opposite bottom corner.  Next, I cut out two “almonds” (adding in seam allowances) from the same contrast satin used for the dress.  I also cut out one of the same shape from some tarlatan on hand.  Tarlatan adds the perfect stiff-but-pliable feel to hats and is also very vintage in its usage.  Next, I sewed the two layers to ‘face’ one another, with the tarlatan sandwiched inside, and everything was top-stitched down.  100_6265-comp

I needed something to keep this little satin thing on my head to see what shape I wanted, so sewed in a small hair comb and a black elastic tie, much like a headband.  The front half of the tilt hat received a dart along the center, to add drama and bring the front down over one eye while the back half was curled over to be tacked down to the center top.  Some lovely fine and soft black netting was cut into a giant square and draped over the front to be tucked in under the back curl of the hat.  Ta da!  This was so simple and fun, I literally need to make more…only I also need a reason and place to wear them.  Humm…

I might come back to this hat in the future and add on something quirky like a giant flower or oversized brooch.  What do you think?  Should I leave it as it is?  Is it just me or does it seem weird and take a bit getting used to having netting over you face?

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1943 “Polka-Stars” Satin Dress and Netted Tilt Hat

This post has been long in coming but is now ironic because McCall Company just re-issued the pattern I used (as McCall #7433), albeit with dramatic changes.  Hopefully this post will show the beauty of this specific dress design and how the re-issue has been altered from the original.  Now, if you buy the reprint, you know how to make it more authentic.

A yearly World War II re-enactment weekend always gives me an excuse to whip up a new 40’s dance dress.  Therefore, I cranked out this pink and black satin year 1943 dress, together with a self-drafted fancy tilt hat!

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I confess, this was one of those stupid/silly sudden-last-minute decisions where a few days ‘til the re-enactment I decided year before’s outfit would not do.  The tiny stars in the fabric made me feel patriotic at the re-enactment dance, without being too much, while the black tempered the sweetness of the pink and the black made me feel dressed up without being too overwhelming (see this article from “Chronically Vintage”).  The tilt hat was directly inspired by the headgear spotted at the wedding of Prince William to Kate Middleton in 2011 as well as coming from my newest interest in millinery.

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  A thin 100% polyester, buff-finish satin, in a rich but light pink with tiny black stars like polka-dots.  The contrast black satin is semi-thick, but also polyester, and was used for the hat as well.

PATTERN:  McCall #5295, year 1943 (this was a lucky find at only $3); the hat was self-drafted

McCall 5295, year 1943, combo of front n back-MNOTIONS:  I had on hand what I needed – the thread, bias tape, interfacing, and zipper for the dress; tarlatan, elastic, hair combs, and netting for the hat.  The buttons down the front of my dress came from the stash of Hubby’s Grandmother.

TIME TO COMPLETE:  I raced through sewing the dress in about 8 to 10 hours.  It was finished on April 24, 2015.  The hat was made in two hours on September 25, 2015.

THE INSIDES:  I had only a few days to make this dress so unfortunately the insides are all raw and terribly fraying.  I was also afraid adding on some sort of bias tape would stiffen the flowing fabric too much and didn’t have time for what I wanted…French seams. After the dance, I came back to clean up the insides, trimming the seams and covering them in fray check liquid. 

TOTAL COST:  This was bought on clearance at Hancock Fabrics as a store was closing so I bought this fabric at about $3 a yard, and this dress only used just under two yards.  The solid black satin was only a ½ yard cut, and went towards both hat and dress contrast, so this cost very little.  The black hat netting was originally expensive, but was a lucky find on clearance at 50 cents for each yard.  So, I suppose my outfit is about $8 in total. 

100_6256a-compMcCall #5295 was just challenging enough to be satisfying and ingeniously designed.  This is also the first vintage 40’s McCall pattern that seems to run very small.  The pattern size I had was technically a tad too big for me but it ended up fitting a bit snug (nothing some smaller seam allowances couldn’t fix).  After making my 1943 dress I had enough leftovers to make these double layered tops, thanks in part to Wartime rationing and economical pattern pieces.

The whole dress is lovely and interesting, but the bodice definitely takes center stage with the neckline.  The dress bodice is constructed in an unusual two-part creative manner for a dramatic style.  The lower front bodice comes first by facing the entire edge and making three rows of shirring from the shoulder to the end of the neckline notch.  Then the four back bodice waistline tucks are sewn and the shoulder is attached to the upper bodice front so this entire neckline can be faced and finished off as well.  Finally, the bodice’s upper front gets overlapped with the lower portion and both are top stitched together along a line of shirring next to the neckline notch.  I was tempted to not add the contrast insert underneath at this point, but I’ll save this idea for next version of the pattern (which will be a winter dress in long sleeves).  The new re-issued version of this pattern sadly leaves out the shirring next to the front neck notch as well as weirdly turning the back into a shirt-look, with its shoulder yoke and tucks.  I can’t wait to see if the new version also faces and constructs the neckline in the same manner.

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Now the contrast under the neckline is such a simple little piece to make such a difference…more or less an odd shaped rectangle folded over with interfacing inside.  The contrast piece only extends from the end of the back neckline to flush with the edge of the button front.  The new re-issue seems to have the contrast wrap all around the neckline and plummet to nothing before the edge of the button front.  Adding in the contrast does nicely support and shape the neckline as well as making it pop on account of both the extra top-stitching involved and the contrast color.

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You will never guess what interesting little tidbit is lurking about this dress in regards to the top front buttonhole.  In order to be authentic, I used my late 30’s/early 40’s Kenmore sewing machine for some of the construction of the dress, especially the buttonholes.  I followed the instructions on the pattern where it said to put in the trio of buttonholes in the dress before adding on the contrast.  O.k., did that, but the end of the contrast piece also receives its own single buttonhole before getting sewn under.  You know what?  The double 100_6293-compbuttonholes align up perfectly together and work as good as a single buttonhole.  On a basic level, I’m supposing the instructions said to do it this way because 4 layers of fabric with interfacing is too thick and bulky, but think about it.  Having separate buttonholes for both the contrast piece and the dress a very smart move and so very “1940’s versatile”.  Depending on the color and print of the dress you could make more than one contrast piece or even leave it off to change up the appearance of your dress!  I’m telling you, vintage patterns do things right.  I hope the new re-issue sticks to this same ingenuity with the contrast piece but my hopes are not high.

The short sleeves were a bit of a surprise to me – what…no gathered, puffed top caps!?  No, the sleeve caps are instructed to be smoothly eased in without any gathers, darts, and such normally found on forties women’s fashion.  They are still quite easy to move in due in part (no doubt) to the fact I cut them on the bias grain just to be on the safe side.  The contrast piece for the sleeves is not a cuff, but something which gets placed under an already finished hem and top-stitched down, similar to the neckline.  The sleeve hem contrast is only offered to match with the short view in the old pattern, but if I was going to make the three-fourths version I was planning on adapting a piece for the end as well, and the long sleeve plackets could be in contrast, too (though not removable).  The new reissue seems to offer similar short and long sleeves, only without the ¾ darted sleeve option.  The long sleeve cuffs on the original are not buttoned, only turned back and buttoned on the overlap, which I don’t see on the re-print, though they seem to have added basic notched cuffs, instead.

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My dress’s skirt makes this so perfect for swing dancing.  I’m so glad I made it for the event (it has seen other wearings since then, too)!  In the original pattern, there is the “traditional 40’s” three paneled back to the skirt, but the front has two side panels with four skinny center panels which dramatically flare out. (See also McCall #5302 from ’43.)  This way, with just the fullness controlled in the front center of the skirt (from the hips down, mostly), the skirt still keeps that slender A-line silhouette, but has extra beauty, fun, and ease of movement.  I love it!  I believe the re-issue to have ‘miss-read’ the intent of those four flared front panels on the original and added in an all-around pleated skirt instead for some uber-fullness that is not as 40’s a silhouette.  Swing dancing in a skirt like what the re-print has might call for some tap panties.

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Here is the reason of the distaste (more like a love/hate relationship) that I have for many modern reprints, especially Butterick and Simplicity.  If you please, let me vent.  They are re-issuing past patterns just well enough to make them tantalizing but at same action frustratingly altering them.  It is wonderful to make these old, hard-to-find, and not-easily-available patterns available to everyone again, yet they have to instead “taint” (in my mind) rather than preserve the past.  Modern is not the past, and modern will change as quickly as one can keep up with.  Thus, sticking to the past should be a bit of a better “tried-and-true” benchmark, I would think.  They could make sure patterns don’t disappear forever by faithfully re-printing them.  However, by changing them, these old patterns are partially “lost” to me.  Leave these vintage patterns  complete with all the individuality that makes a 40’s pattern from the forties, and so on for each decade, giving people a chance to learn and discover.  But they don’t, and so many will miss out on the awesome things that sewing true vintage will teach to one who makes it.  Shame on McCall’s Company…don’t mess with what’s already great.  A modern tweaking won’t make it better for me and many others, I am sure.  McCall’s, if you want the original of a pattern reach out better to us bloggers and sewists and collectors.  If you want to offer a modern version of vintage, don’t call it an archive pattern.  Vintage is awesome and authentic…leave it that way, that’s why we want it.  Let those of us that sew put our own tweaks, touches, and changes into our clothes if we so please, thank you…that’s what makes sewing beautifully individual.  Please join with me in the discussion – input and conversation is welcomed on this topic so I’m not just “getting on my high horse”.

In the next few days I will go into a short but further detailed post on the hat I made.  Stay tuned!

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“Retro Forward” Burda Style – 1920’s Geometric Bias Dress

In strong simulation of the famous Madeleine Vionnet, this Burda Style dress is perfect for modern day glamour a la 1920’s.  My fabric is a silvery pink satin.  With its frosty sheen and surrealist clock “cog works” print, the fabric reminds me specifically of the cold, hard, mathematical beauty that I love about the Art Deco era.  The dress, in classic Vionnet style, is on the bias for a flowing, body complimentary gown the likes of which are not seen that often in modern patterns anymore.  I love this dress!

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McCall #6560 year 1931 Vionnet style facy gownI am not exaggerating – this is one of the most ingenious designs I have come across in my sewing.  It’s so simple yet so complex and so smart.  Just a few geometric shapes cut in the right grain line makes all the difference.  Vionnet had the foresight and ingenuity to create very similar styles, but Burda made this kind of dress reasonable in price and availability as a great option to going with a pricey hard-to-find old 1930’s/1920’s original patterns (at left)…without compromising authenticity.  Yes, believe it or not the 1920’s was more than just beads and fringe – it was also about bias cuts, freedom to move unconfined, and mathematical glamor.

THE FACTS:102 tango dress line drawing

FABRIC:  A 100% polyester satin bought from a Hancock Fabrics store

PATTERN:  Cowl Neck Dress #102, from 07/2012, on Burda Style’s store online or in the July monthly magazine issue.

NOTIONS:  I had the interfacing and thread I needed, as well as the money coins which went into the fabric weights for the dress’ inside.

THE INSIDES:  As this is on the bias, all seams are left raw and free.

100_3629-compTIME TO COMPLETE:  This was made quickly in about 6 hours, and finished on August 8, 2014.

TOTAL COST:  about $10

This was my first Burda Pattern to make and I’m glad it was a success.  The instructions for the neck/bodice all-in-one facing were quite impossible to understand merely reading but as long as I followed them to the letter in my sewing, as weird as they sounded all worked out great.  I didn’t do any changes to the pattern.  Besides fitting in the sides, I kept the proportions and length as-is.

As for any Burda Style pattern, printing and/or tracing is necessary to have a usable pattern to lay on your desired fabric.  My pattern was traced out using a roll of medical paper from the insert sheet of the magazine issue but you can also buy it, download it, and print it out from Burda Style’s online store.  It’s at this preliminary step that you pick out your proper size and add in your choice of seam allowance width.  A scissor with a magnetic ruler guide helps immensely to quicken along the step to getting a finished pattern prepped.  Sorry to repeat something you might already know, but this is just an “FYI” for those that don’t know.

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Usually I grade from my “normal” Burda size (usually the smallest one offered) up to the next size for the hips but for this pattern I made the whole dress out of the size for my hips, just to be on the safe side.  However, I ended up taking in each side a few inches.  I don’t know if the bias is making the dress size seem so big or if it’s truly the sizing but either way for more of a body fit, rather than a loose and overall drapey fit, go a size down.  Now that I’ve made a few bias garments I’ve found there is a delicate balance.  A loose fit is needed so the bias does hang a bit on the body (you don’t want the bias stretched over you) but yet too much ease can make bias dresses look bad and frumpy with draping and wrinkles in the wrong places.  100_3614a-comp

The vertical sides of the dress are on the bias, but the side panels take turns with the main body of the dress to change things up.  There is the straight grain on the semi-horizontal downward edges of the panels while those corresponding seams of the dress are on the bias.  I had to be careful of both differing grains to ease in the fullness and yet also not stretch the bias in those spots– slightly tricky.

Bias cut also means no closures, no darts – just simple beauty.  Sweet!!!  While on me, if I pinch the dress and pull it out it could just keep going.  When putting this on, it falls open wide so it seems like a giant dress but then once it comes on over the head it magically falls around my body to fit.  Bias cut is so awesome yet so sadly unknown by the general non-sewing populace (at least from my experience).

My chosen fabric is feather-weight so it really makes the dress flow nicely, but with a slightly heavier fabric (such as a rayon crepe or silk charmeuse) the dress would have more of a correct drape.  Thus, I had to add some strategic weights at certain spots of the dress.  The cowl needed to drape better to keep the neckline down so I added a weight to the inside of the center front.  Then, the dress was lopsided so I had to also add a matching weight to the inside center back neckline.  My weights are merely small rectangular “pockets”, made from the same fabric as the dress, and they hold two quarters each.  So, I guess I ended up putting and extra dollar into my dress just to keep it hanging right on me!  Whatever it takes…

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I really don’t know why but the high-low hem didn’t turn out as obvious as in the pattern’s line drawing.  The high-low hem was a trademark of the late 1920’s and very early 30’s, which is why this dress is part of my “Retro Forward” blog series.  Around the time of the stock market crash of 1929, hemlines became more modestly transitional to the mid-calf skirt/dress lengths of the 1930’s by being frequently part short (like the 1920’s) yet getting elongated (mostly visually) by also being partially long.  Thus, during the transition of the 30’s and 20’s all sorts of hemlines became popular such as “high-low” hems, “hankie” hems (see this post), fur trimmed hems – and the variety doesn’t end there!  I find it funny how I still see many of these hemline styles in modern clothes.  Also, this Burda pattern is totally a Tango dress…similar to Folkwear’s version.  Many varied length hemlines were seen on dresses styled with a Spanish influence to be worn swaying to the then “new” music craze of the Tango.  Dancing that required full movement of the body was then not only popular but actually possible, too, for corset-less unconfined women in the late 1920’s, and crazy hemlines with body hugging bias cuts made the dancer seem all the more exotic.

This dress can easily go modern, but I preferred to glam it up ‘a la’ late 20’s style, with my fishnet stockings, bobbed hair, and my handmade long beaded necklace.  My Tango-style shoes are (I think) “1960’s does 1920’s” – they are “Debs” made by the famous Palter DeLiso footwear designer.

Even our background has the same time period and the same geometric shapes as my dress.  The building behind me is one which I have long admired and I happy to be integrating it into a project’s photo shoot.  It was built in 1930 as a power-station for an electric company, it is so awesome for such a mundane use, but that is the Art Deco movement to put glamour in everyday life.  The National Register of Historic Places Inventory for this building (page 16) lists it as “having metal grillwork in an abstract chevron-like pattern fills the rectangular openings” between the terra cotta and marble of the piers on the building.  “Above the openings of the spandrels, between the piers, large stylized ornament, linear, with hard edges, embellishes the parapets.”  Aren’t those details amazing?!  Sorry to go into detail here but I love historic architecture appreciation, and this building is up there on my “favorites” list so I can easily get going!

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I hope you like Art Deco like I do and hopefully this post can inspire you look for this era’s buildings in your town or even to work a little of this era into your sewing.  Have you tried bias garments, especially these geometric 20’s and 30’s ones with beautiful simple design like this dress?  If you have, they’re special aren’t they?!  If not, you need to go ahead and make one…let me know about it…I’d like to see it!

An Emerald Mid-1930’s Vionnet Gown

With Prom season upon us, I’d like to post about a quick and easy but awesomely elegant gown to make from the genius of history’s famous designer Madeleine Vionnet.  I love finding patterns that look the opposite of the amount of difficulty they present in the making process.  If you’ve got a handful of hours, a super fancy buckle, and several yards of nice fabric with a formal event to attend, then this pattern could be for you!  It’s the epitome of 1930’s glamour yet passes as fully modern.

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THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  a 100% polyester crepe back satin (I wish I could have used silk, but one can only spend so much dough for fabric…*sigh*)vionnet book covers - from iocolor

NOTIONS:  Just thread and bias tape were the only notions I needed, besides the buckle.

PATTERN:  Pattern #12: “Planes and Gussets”, page 84, of “Madeleine Vionnet” book by Betty Kirke (book covers image from here)

TIME TO COMPLETE:  Only four hours!  It was made on the evening of December 4, 2015, with about an hour more to place and sew on the buckle and finish the ties.

100_6801-compTHE INSIDES:  All bias bound, except for the bottom hem which is on the bias and left raw with some fray check to keep the edge in check.

TOTAL COST:  the crepe-back satin was a Hancock Fabrics “Beautiful Fine Fabric” special – I bought it on sale for about $20.  The buckle was bought at an antique/vintage re-sale shop for about $35.

This Vionnet gown makes me feel so amazing and elegant, like some movie star of the silver screen of olden times.  Words to describe it would just seem tacky.  The bias moving with you and flowing around you is a lovely feeling.  Every lady deserves a good bias dress.  I have heard some women mention that only certain figures can pull off a bias dress, but I disagree.  First, women of the 1930’s were generally slender (it was the Depression) but they did wear foundational undergarments which helped with shaping.  Shaping underneath or not, nevertheless when the bias is cut well with a good design it will do a body good!  After all, I have never yet found any RTW (ready-to-wear) frock which accomplishes the bias correctly like when you find a really good pattern and make it yourself.

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Although I absolutely love it, I cannot figure out an anomaly about this gown.  The original dress which is on display online at the MET museum lists this design of evening gown as dating to 1936-1937.  However, the Betty Kirke book from which the pattern came from lists this dress as 1935.  Alright – who’s right?  Which year is this dress?  Also, between knowing what I know about fashion history and what I’ve read, the gown is both behind its time and ahead at the same moment.  The early 1930’s had a fad for the “half-naked-from-the-waist-up” styles of evening gown, then by about 1933 the styles became slightly more decent by following the fad for higher necks and shoulders covered with ruffles or poufy sleeves (discussed here at “Witness2Fashion” under “The Letty Lynton Dress” and “Very Bare Backs, 1930’s”, also see my past-made mid-30’s evening gown).  This emerald Vionnet gown has a taste of both contrasting styles.

So, I’m slightly confused but still impressed that Vionnet’s design of this post’s featured dress is from the mid-1930’s, but it goes with the Depression era perfectly when women’s clothes were excessively extravagant and richly elegant – the opposite of the (then) current economic circumstances.  Simple ornamentation is the ‘normal’ key to such clothes…the gown itself is amazing interest enough… but Vionnet’s gown calls for a unique closure to be a focus point!  How daring, but it works.  Another common feature to similar 30’s gowns are the extremely low backs and hemlines – achieving this with Vionnet’s evening gown was hard and a tad tricky.  I’ll explain further down.

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The patterns in the book are small sized with no specifications as to what percent to grade up to for full size.  I went through a copy store’s services to have them scan in, plot out, enlarge, and print my patterns since this was my first time making a pattern from this book.  The only “bench mark” I went by to know how much to enlarge was for me to pick one spot on the garment for which I could say how long it should be, and figure the rest of the garment should follow grading up properly from there.  For instance, I realized for this pattern that the length of the front rectangles, from the top of the neckline to what should be the side waist, should be about the length of my collar bone to my waist (adding in some extra inches for error).  This measurement was a define spot to realize how much to grade the book’s pattern up to…probably not the best way but wasn’t the worst either, just so as long as it worked.

As far as I could tell the pattern is made for Japanese sizes 9 AR (US/Canadian sizes 8, U.K. size 10, and European size 38).  This would make it for bust 34” (86 cm.), waist 26” (66 cm.), hip 37 (94 cm.).  I don’t remember where I read this but it seems accurate, maybe slightly smaller.  I am very close to this size so I didn’t make any changes to the fit because bias cut is a bit forgiving.

100_6776a-compAs it turned out, I could have made some small changes/adjustments to the fit, but this is just really the perfectionist in me wanting everything just right…a carbon copy of Vionnet.  Part of me wishes I had made my gown just a tad longer so it sweeps the floor like a true 30’s gown, but that’s impractical for me so my dress is just below ankle length.  Also the dip in the back where the ties make a “U” turn around the inserts could have been made a little wider for a sharper curve.  My back curve to the dress is more like a “U” that got bent open and I think only the upper tops of the inserts could be lengthened for a look more like the original Vionnet dress.  Pick, pick, pick – it’s what I do.  My dress is fine and the pattern is really easy…a tad hard to adjust.

The pattern for this evening gown is awesomely simple and so awkwardly large.  Except for 100_6593a-compthe little parallelogram-shaped piece which completes the back dip, the dress is made of one huge shape.  I really don’t know how someone who doesn’t have ample floor space or a gigantic table can cut this dress out.  We have large open floor spaces at our home but even still it was maxed out to lay out 3 yards of 60 inch fabric in a single layer.  This also had to be done when no one was around to walk in the house but me!  As you can also see in my picture, I let the natural end of the fabric’s width dictate the seam where the dress would have a panel joined in to complete the dress.  I did not follow the “joining line” on the pattern, as I wanted minimal seams (the dress seems to have been accommodating for the 35 inch or 45 inch fabric widths normal for those times).

I believe the key to this dress being a success is 1.) the necessity of making the neck high and back low and 2.) the placement of the buckle.  Firstly, the back dip needs to be low, low…like right at or above the waist because if not, the bias will not spread out over the bum properly.  The neck needs to be high (close to the collarbone) for the back dip to be in the right place but also because it keeps the front in proportion, especially when it comes to adding the buckle which brings the dress in.

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Thus, secondly, I found from looking at the original garment from Vionnet at the MET and experimenting with the placement on my own dress that the buckle has to be at a “sweet spot” on the body to reach the intended shape, drape, and look.  There is a triangular space above your belly button that is between your ribcage just about big enough for the palm of my hand to cover.  When the dress neckline comes to reach or go just under your collarbone (where it needs to hit), THIS SPOT between the ribcage and above the waist is where the buckle should go on the dress.  Why am I so strong on this?  I have seen plots of Vionnet’s garments where it proves how her clothes where designed with the composition of the natural lines of the body and its muscles in mind so it makes sense to me for her to pull the dress in at the same place where your body is “pulled in”…not where it pivots.  Also, when the buckle is placed in that “sweet spot” the dress naturally flares out over both the bust and the waist/hips, creating the illusion of a small middle and at a more proper waistline, too.  Conventional dressing knows nothing of the power of working with the body, and most people (including me) get so wrapped up in the only spots we focus on – waist, hips, bust, and maybe shoulders or other points, too.  The comfort spot of “the waist” is different on everyone, but the buckle’s “sweet spot” is the same on everyone, and a very strong point in the body as it is…a good place to hang the dress.DSC_0584a-comp

The ‘leaping gazelle across the pastoral scene’ on the original buckle is so beautiful and also very appropriately classic to the 1920’s and 1930’s.  An image widely used on anything and everything to home and eating pieces to fashion (see my very own Elgin Compact, at right) and ornamental purposes, the leaping gazelle is an Art Deco carryover from the peaceful Art Nouveau era.  The 1930’s 100_6803a-compideal enjoyed reliving the Grecian past, through flowing, body-conscious dressing, and no one expressed this better than Vionnet, so the carved ivory buckle on the original gown could not be any more perfect.  My own buckle, however, takes on the more uber-fancy and bling-loving side of the Art Deco era though it does have some swirling to the design.  My buckle reminds me of costume jewelry with all its gems and details but it is some sort of fine metal (sterling silver, maybe) because it polished up nicely, even though the gems are probably fake.  I also pinned another authentic vintage 1920’s or 1930’s pin to keep my back straps in place at the back of my neck.100_6755a-comp

We went back to the proper time period and location where a dress like this would have been worn for our photo shoot location – the Chase Park Plaza.  This hotel in downtown was newly completed in 1931 “as an opulent Art Deco masterpiece despite the Great Depression.”  Many famous people have walked the Chase Park Plaza’s hallways and stayed under their roof, and with Art deco splendor around every corner need I say why I felt even snazzier modeling my fancy evening gown?!

“Retro Forward” Burda Style: “Wrap, Drape, and Tie” Party Set

Rather than going with the popular colors of the Christmas holiday season – red and green – my new ‘nice’ outfit for this year’s end is going with the basics of black and white, skirt and top. This way it is really an all-year-round fancy outfit with many styling options…each time I wear the skirt and blouse (especially the blouse) I can look slightly different!

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Both of the patterns I used are not “new” anymore, being from 2012. This fact combined with the fact that nobody, except for one skirt, had posted a completed version had me quite apprehensive. However, I think I have found a way to make the best of these patterns by going with the basics to bring out their amazing styling. After some difficulty with fitting the skirt, I am extremely happy with my finished pieces.

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  For the skirt: Two yards of a basic satin, with a low-shine and slightly crisp but still supple ‘hand’. It is 100% polyester. For the blouse: One yard of a white chiffon, which has a small, low-key pattern woven in as part of the fabric. It feels like it could be a rayon, but my guess is it is probably polyester.Tie Front Blouse 04-2012 #126, line drawing

NOTIONS:  I had everything I needed on hand – thread, bias tape, a zipper, a button, a waistband hook-and-eye, interfacing, a small cut of elastic, and stay tape.

PATTERNS:  Tie Front Blouse #126, views A, B, or C, from 04/2012; Skirt with Draping #107, from 10/2012

line drawing - Skirt With Draping 10-2012 #107TIME TO COMPLETE:  About 4 or 5 hours were spent to make each project.

THE INSIDES:  The blouse is all French seams, needed because of the material, and the skirt has bias bound edges, with the back panel self-fabric covered by a facing.

TOTAL COST:  The satin for the skirt was probably about $10 to $12, while the white chiffon is something I have had on hand in my stash for about 10 years…so I’m counting it as free at this point.

Out of the two garments here, what is the neatest part about the skirt in particular is that it came from the very first Burda magazine I bought. It was also one of the very first patterns from the magazine that I gravitated towards. Now I’ve finally made it in reality, not just in my mind’s eye! I will admit, I was not enthused by the way the model’s skirt is made from stripes in such a busy print. The design is lost. Personally, I like my solid satin version sooo much better.

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Doggy behind photo bomb!

Once I found the right fabric for the skirt and had a reason to wear it, I was so excited to make it so I made a shortcut to get it done quicker – used it directly from the assembled PDF paper version. I avoided the tracing out from the page insert in the magazine. Once all the papers were assembled together, I merely cut it out with all the sizes and cut out what size I wanted. Ooops! In my rush I forgot to add on the seam allowance. I really do and should have known better. Well, I have had a few failures with Burda skirts not fitting my hips before this, so I actually cut out a size bigger than normal for this draped front skirt. This size bigger actually gave me 3/8 seam allowance to sew my skirt into a finished size down from what I intended to make. I had to look at my mistake from a practical level and did not want nor did I see the need to scrap my project, but I was back to making the size I did not want, one which normally does not fit me. I figured I would make it as is and see what needs to be fixed from there.

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Many times my best ideas which make a garment actually turn out better stem from a mistake. This skirt is no exception. Despite my confusion with the seam allowance and the sizing, when I was cutting out the pattern I did think, “This seems to have very straight lines…” and honestly I think that is the main problem with this skirt. It is not shapely at all – it reminds me of the 1930’s patterns I’ve made where they are made for beanpole women, with no account for a booty or chunky thighs. If you’re quite skinny this pattern’s shaping will not be a problem, otherwise it will be one unless you reshape it like it did. As the original finished skirt turned out way too tight from the hips and below, but big in the waist, I opened up the back seam to let it open naturally to find out how much extra room was needed. As it turned out, I added in a center panel running vertically down the back skirt which gave me an added 1 ½ inches. Before I added that panel, I did cut a curve into the waist of about ¾ in smaller, shaping the back so much better. Not only does my skirt now fit better (well it’s still slightly big…) but I like the added interest and complimentary line of the added panel. It also gives me a tad more walking room in what is already a quite limiting hem – no high kicks or wide strides in this skirt!

100_6681a-compWith all these adjustments, I did also make a number of changes to the pattern. First of all, because of the back extension panel, the zipper is in the side seam. Secondly the front drape is single layered rather than double layered as a self-facing like the pattern directs. Two layers for the front drape strikes me as heavy, time-consuming (not always a bad thing), and overwhelming to the simple skirt underneath. Perhaps, with a rayon or polyester fabric the double layered drape might work well, but I wanted simplicity here, and I knew the satin would not hang naturally doubled up, so I went with a single layer with a skinny ¼ inch hem. Yes, the wrong side of the satin and the hem shows in the middle of the drape, but I don’t think either appears bad or out of place or even that noticeable. A natural hanging drape is most important to the proper look, and boy do I like the look! Any way I see it, I like how slimming the silhouette is and how interestingly the drape grows out from the front somehow. The drape is also perfect for hiding a tummy that is happily filled with all the delectable goodness which parties and the holidays have to offer. The skirt does fall at natural to high waistline making it perfect to go with the short and simple wrap blouse.

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The blouse was very easy to make and draft (yes draft, you don’t get a pattern but a guide to draw it yourself), but the French seams and the light fabric to get the hang and fit right slows down the construction. Drafting it myself was the best part of this blouse – it makes it feel like it’s more “mine” and is a good practice in pattern drawing. I use thin but sturdy medical paper to draw my patterns…it the best stuff ever for this kind of work. The medical paper is very reasonably priced and is sold in large amounts on a roll, like wrapping paper, and as easy to write on as it is to see through.

I stuck with my traditional size which I make with Burda patterns but I wish now I had actually went up a size for the back panel. It’s not a big deal to me be just a little snug for extreme stretching to put those ornaments at the top of the tree or hide that present for someone else at a high shelf. The sleeves of my blouse are elbow length (as you can see) merely because that’s all I had room for to cut out. Personally I wanted the long sleeves but I had no choice, and now I like the elbow length better because I think it keeps my blouse more all-season. Also, I sort of wish I had lengthened the back length and the side length by maybe a ½ inch or a full inch so the blouse isn’t so much a crop top, but again, this is no biggie, and I don’t like it any less. These points are just worthy of a mention so anyone else who makes this pattern can look out for what they too might like or dislike, and so I can remember, too, and change things accordingly “next time”.

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My big sole change to the pattern for the blouse had to do with the steps of construction. I added on the sleeves before I sewed up the side seams. This way the side seams can be sewn in one continuous line from the sleeve end to the bottom hem. This was also not the best idea for a sharp angled corner as the pattern shows but I wanted a slightly more curved underarm seam so it worked out great for my preference.

There was not enough chiffon leftover for me to make self-fabric bias facing like I would have liked, so I made do by using lightweight and supple stay tape as the edge facing. I took a small loop of tiny round elastic and tucked that into the neckline corner to close the button on the other side. The ball button is a vintage shell item from my stash with a metal looped bottom.

Both pieces harken back to several trends of several decades in the 19th century, the reason why this post is part of my “Retro Forward with BurdaVogue Couturier #366, late 1940's & Vogue 6292, early 1948 Style” series. The draped front portion of the skirt calls to my mind the popular sarong styles of the mid-1940s, or the flowing ankle length dresses and bottoms of 1930 era, and the re-makes of these styles in the 1990’s (see below right). The front draping even reminds me of the post-World War II “Dior” era (see the two left pictures)– simple design, detailed appearance, elegant style but slimming silhouettes were the rule for such skirts. All Hollywood 1484, year 1944 & Vogue 9013, year 1994these adjectives can apply to my Burda skirt too, I think. The tiny limiting hem circumference and gentle shaping slope of the hips first of all reminds me of the 1950’s “wiggle” dresses and skirt, but also the “hobble” looks of the early 1910 decade. Both arose from a trend where it was considered the feminine silhouette to have a certain shape and restricted movement. This Burda skirt is like a modern interpretation of this, not as restrictive as the trends in the past…more like a 1980’s suit bottom – slimming, complimentary, with a touch of constraint.  Burda itself has a plus size pattern option which is similar to the draped front skirt.

Butterick 2139, 1940's wrap side tie blousesSimplicity 2937, year 1949 pattern for a lady's jacket and skirtFor the blouse, tie front or wrap-style are synonymous with the 1950’s younger “rockabilly” styles, but the 1940’s, 1930’s, and even other decades had these designs as well. These kind of ‘minimal-closure-wrap-and-tie’ blouses are simple in shape and versatile making them perfect for the two eras of the 40’s Butterick 8170, a 1950s rockabilly style setand 30’s where women scrimped and saved and “made-do” on little supplies, yet managed to look glamorous and have new garments. Many of these 30’s and 40’s “draft your own blouse” patterns were even freely published in magazines or articles (see “Vintage Pattern Files” for some of these) as a quick and simple solution to the perennial question of, “What will I wear?”  Visit “Laura After Midnight” blog post here for a wonderful 1950’s era easy draft wrap/tie blouse and skirt.

Here’s a toast to a past year of projects “in the can” and a new year of more creativity and adventures ahead! Happy sewing and happy New Year everyone!

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