Colonial Days at Fort de Chartres

Our family’s annual weekend event of 18th century re-enacting has come and gone by as of the weekend before, but I added some advancements and additions to our outfits worthy to share.  My set is barely different – I wore a lightweight boned vest-style corset underneath this time and remembered my embroidered pocket.  Hubby’s outfit is pretty much the same as last year too, except this time he remembered to wear the tricorne hat I made oh so many years back. The main addition this year is my creation of a vest, with some re-fashioned pants, worn by our little man so he could look like a half-size colonial gentleman.  As I did last year for his shirt (which he thankfully still fit into this year), the rest of the pieces you’ll see for our son where whipped up by me in one afternoon, using only scraps of what was on hand.  I am so proud of him in this!  Time for an old-fashioned family photo.

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It was a lovely day, and happily a dry one, too, but a tad on the warm side for all the layers 18th century re-enacting requires.  As happy as my son is to wear what mommy makes, he was almost too warm to appreciate it as much as he might have otherwise.  Nevertheless, once he saw the fife and drummers and the bagpipe playing Scottish Highlanders, he forgot to worry about anything else!  Please visit my Instagram page to see some video clips of the wonderful Grand Parade at the end of the day.

I know my hubby’s waistcoat is more working class in its heavy canvas, but we had extra cotton tapestry, nice and thick, on hand for seat cushion covers.  Why not go dressy with my son’s vest if I can?  He does look so good being spiffy!

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Basically, I roughly drafted our son’s vest off of an existing modern vest and tweaked the cut to make it closer to my husband’s vest.  Looking at the pattern cover image of this boy’s set from Jas Townsends helped me immensely, too.  I cut the fronts so they would have a full coverage enough to overlap down the center, with the overall vest having a long past the hips length.  The vest is backed in Kona cotton and fully lined so a double DSC_0485-comp,wwas then cut off of the tapestry pieces, as well. After the shoulders and half of the side seams were sewn on both lining and tapestry, I sewed the entire outer edges together (right sides in) halfway up at the side seams for the vents, and leaving a hole at the center back bottom to turn it inside out.  Then the raw armhole edges were turned in and I hand sewed the edges together.  This ‘lining-used-as-a-whole-body-facing’ makes for such a pristine and clean finished look.

I self-drafted the pocket flaps, lined them as for the body of the vest, and sewed them down without having real working storage available there…only confusing to my son.  Well, this was a quickie project and I’m not doing welt openings again anytime soon unless I have to.  I didn’t even bother to do buttons and buttonholes all the way down like I really would have preferred, only sewing two pewter buttons on the pocket flaps.DSC_0487-comp,w  Rather than button closing front, I opted for a simple internal ribbon tie to keep the vest front closed.  Am I sneaky cheating on a historical garment?  Probably.  However, doing so on a child’s garment is reasonable to me.  If it was for me, that would be another story.  At this point in his life, he grows out of things so quickly.  I wanted something believably accurate (historical-wise), good looking, simple to make, easy to dress our son in, and smartly economical by using up stuff on hand.  I think I found what I was looking for here, and boy do I think it looks awesome on him.  I’m hoping I made it generous enough so that he can get another year’s wear out of the vest.

Screenshot_2017-06-03, cropped,p,wThe breeches started out as some modern, heavy twill pants which were rather high-water on him.  I merely turned the hem up and under into the body of the pants, tacked that in place, then made a tuck at the outer end of the new ‘hem’ to taper in under the knees.  This is again not as authentic as I would like, but easy and passable.  These breeches even make for nice looking 1930’s knickers.  Luckily, the long vest covered the modern zipper fly to his pants!

I’m looking forward to fine tuning these outfits each event, especially those for our son since boy’s historical clothes are hard to come by.  Until next time!

Summer Gingham and Straw

My first sewing for this year’s summer season is effortlessly simple.  It’s also basically everything associated with an old-time American summer picnic – gingham cotton, basket-like straw, bright red cherries, easy and comfortable dressing (no less cute, though), and good times in the backyard.

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I had to bring my pet dachshund into the picture for good measure!  He’s a loving little shadow to me, though he is camera shy.

Butterick 7161, yr. 1954THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  a 30 by 45 inch cut of an all-cotton, loosely-woven ‘homespun’

PATTERN:  Butterick 7161, year 1954 – it was a free gift from a kind Etsy seller.

NOTIONS:  I only needed thread, a bit of interfacing, some bias tape scraps, and 3 buttons – all of which I had on hand

TIME TO COMPLETE:  My blouse was whipped up in 2 hours one afternoon at the end of April 2017.

DSC_0417a-comp,wTHE INSIDES:  cleanly bias bound edges

TOTAL COST:  The fabric, my only expense, was bought at Wal-mart’s remnant area in their fabric department for only $2.23!

This blouse just makes me happy.  I love the styling – just enough ‘vintage’ touch to be neat and unique, yet still classic.  The colors are muted and cool, and pair well with so many different bottoms (skirts, pants, and shorts) in all colors (mostly khaki, denim, and black, but even red will do).  From a practical point of view, this was so cheap!  Yet, for how well it fits on me and nicely finished I made it, this is such a deal.  No wonder I buy fabric and sew for myself versus picking up ready-to-wear!DSC_0282a-comp,w

Making this top sleeveless was not precisely by choice, but I like it.  I was lucky enough to make a blouse from this as it was!  My blouse does look really good with sweaters, luckily, for when I’m stuck inside freezing air-conditioning or out in a chilly night.  I find it interesting how generous and comfortable the armscye is on a 1950s era sleeveless blouse.  The armholes from the next decade of the 60’s are so much tighter, and I’m always paring them down but it’s never good enough.  Maybe I’ll need to try sleeveless 50’s fashions more often.

The only major special detail to this blouse is the gathers which come from under the collar.  They are an ingenious way to both add an interesting design element and provide bust shaping.  I thought about pleating the excess fabric rather than gathering it (as I did), but I plan to use this pattern again and I can try that out then.

DSC_0283-comp,wHalfway through sewing this blouse, I had a scare.  I realized this ‘homespun’ cotton was quite fragile when I was stretching the blouse back neckline into the collar piece.  It tore way too easily into the seam allowance.  Thank goodness it didn’t tear any further into the blouse or I would have been devastated because this blouse is my new go-to, throw-it-on frequent favorite.  Once that rip happened, I was glad I had cut the as-is size of the pattern, which was technically too big for me.  I ended up leaving the blouse its generous size because I didn’t want another tear happening in the body of the fabric, which I could totally see happening just from being worn if it fit tighter.  The cotton is so soft, it kind of ‘droops’ down anyway and you can’t tell how generous it is on me.  Between the comfy fit and the loose homespun, it does make for an “I-don’t-feel-it-on” weightless summer blouse.DSC_0285-comp,w

A view of the back is rather basic but my vintage 50’s hat makes it amazing, if you ask me.  Look at that stunning weave of the two different kinds of straw!  The perfect condition and the steal of a price that I paid, makes this one of my prized vintage hats.  To complete the accessorizing details, my fun cherry fruit earrings are vintage from my dear Grandmother.

Blouses, especially 50’s era blouses are my newest ‘thing’ currently.  I’ve been whipping out several already with a few more in my projects queue to sew yet.  Thus, look for more separates to come here on the blog in next few months!

Runway Relaxation

Only a fishing spot in the middle of a pond could provide such a relaxing method of modeling my casual dress on the “runway” of a boardwalk.  I just can’t help but think of songs like, “Under the Boardwalk” or “Sittin’ on the Docks of the Bay”.

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This dress does not have the best fit and is not one of my better projects (in my estimation), but I don’t care.  It’s still done well, and was a quick and fun sewing project that gives me an easy garment for lazy days and playtime.  No pressure, just pleasure – this is one project where I let my “hard-on-myself” standards go, and it really feels good.

THE FACTS:100_5406a-comp,w

FABRIC:  a lovely half rayon modal and half supima cotton blend knit. 

NOTIONS:  I already had the thread and interfacing needed, but, in lieu of buttons, I went and bought the things to add on snaps down the front placket.

PATTERN:  McCall’s 6747, year 2013

TIME TO COMPLETE:  I took a total of about 6 hours to make the dress and another two hours to install the snaps.  It was finished on June 13, 2015.

THE INSIDES:  left raw and loosely stitched together

TOTAL COST:  I didn’t care to wait to get the best price and risk losing my chance to buy the fabric.  Thus, for a total of 2 yards I spent about $12 to purchase this fabric from the now defunct Hancock Fabrics.  The snap installing pliers and necessary supplies were bought from Wal-mart for about $20, but it really free because I used a gift card to pay.

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Some words need to be said about the fabric.  A modal and cotton blend has great qualities, and is indeed lovely to wear because it has a fluid drape, like a rayon challis perhaps, but the added stability of it being a stable knit helps it keep its shape.  This particular content blend also feels so breathable, lightweight, and comfortable on the skin, that even in warmer weather, my striped placket dress still is cool to wear with its long maxi length and ¾ length sleeves.  (I also like to protect myself from the sun, too, and don’t mind covering up to do so…anything to avoid sunscreen – yuck.)  Then, in chilly weather, the fabric’s brushed feel makes it cozy, while the neutral tans and brown on the fabric work for spring and fall.

However, on the flip side to all the positives just mentioned to the fabric, but it is a bit stressful to sew.  It seems that the way the chains form into a tight knit together with the fine rayon and cotton makes for a delicate fabric which acquires holes and tears very easily.  From my experience, I notice that both 100% cotton knit and 100% rayon knit also have the tendency to be similarly delicate to sew, but combined together make for an unpredictable character under your machine needle.  I used a medium weight, knit fabrics needle for sewing my dress, and I do not think a professional might have used much else, but as it was, if the machine came down on a chain of the knit the wrong way…whoops!  Then, there’s a minutely small but still unwelcome hole.  This same thing happened, as I mentioned above, to the rayon knit of my yellow 1946 blouse and my cotton knit Doris Day 1947 blouse. Boo hoo.  Apparently, this is where a small amount of “Fray Check” liquid comes in handy if I can’t screw up my eyes for some incredibly tiny stitching.  I just can’t win ‘em all.

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I changed the layout of this pattern to accommodate the way the stripes of my fabric were laying and the fact I only had two yards.  Vertical stripes as wide as these cannot go horizontal and look good…and I wasn’t going to try and see otherwise.  Luckily my fabric was 60 inch wide and so my dress’s hem and top (shoulders and neck) were at selvedge and selvedge.  I was thrown off with the sizing of this dress being a non-number sizing, merely an extra-small, small, medium and so on.  I was in between so I went up to a small, but now I wish I would have went up another size all over, maybe more so for the sleeves.  I will have to remember this about the sizing since I want to try this pattern again for a top.  Nevertheless, I’m happy enough with how this dress turned out.  I’ve got other striped dresses and the stripes in this close fitting dress shows off body curves far more than a baggy frock would anyway.  I’ve got curves…why hide them?!

 

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This was my very first placket and I feel like I graded pretty well in my own report card.  However, the pattern’s instructions might have been better than to leave the raw edges exposed, but hey, with knits raw edges are o.k. anyway.  (My successive plackets sewn into woven fabrics all have enclosed seams.)  The placket pieces and the neckline facing were both cut out of one solid color stripe for some fun symmetry.

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Taking things to another innovative “first” for me – I did snaps!  Installing the snaps took maybe as much time as my total to make the dress itself, but since it was a quick project I wanted to spend some “extra something” to give it a special touch.  It was rather unnerving to actually go ahead and place the snaps in my good fabric of the dress because there’s no room for a major mess-up.

Not knowing where to start, I bought the only option available at the current sewing supply sources – a bench press style kit which had the pliers and a dozen lovely pearl-topped snaps.  I experimented on some scrap fabric with similar thickness as the dress’ placket and found that making snaps is hard and tricky!

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At first, we (meaning I had my hubby do the brunt of the squeezing of the press) found that not putting enough pressure into the snaps makes them not even hold together…but, we later found out (on my dress’ snaps, bummer) that too much pressure is also bad.  Squeezing the press too much smashes the snap backs to smithereens and mars the pretty pearl tops.  Apparently there is a fine line of how much pressure to apply for the perfect snaps.  A fabric store employee told me about another option – a method where you tap with a hammer twice on the snaps set in a base, more like eyelets…but I can’t do eyelets all that well on fabric (I’ve tried) so that might not work for me.  Oh well, I still like my snaps, think they will stay through wearing and washing, aaaand gives my dress a touch of ready-to-wear.  I’ve had compliments on this dress, and it’s always, “No way – you made that?!”  You bet.  This feels so darn good.

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My necklace is special to me.  Ever since my first visit as a pre-teen, I’ve loved the “Gem and Mineral” shows and exhibitions which go on in our town, where you can find out about the rocks and geology of our earth.  There I can just look and learn but also buy amazing, special, related items at reasonable prices, as they are coming from the vendors who make and/or source the gifts.  My all-time favorite gemstone is malachite, the first in my rock collection.  Finally, I recently bought myself a jewelry piece of it…the heart shaped pendant you see in my pictures.

100_5585-compWhat would a fishing pond be without duck bottoms!?  Aren’t they cute!  A family of ‘quackers’ were piddling around me during the photo shoot and the little ones kept dunking for a meal, entertaining me.  Hopefully the duck parents don’t mind me sharing a picture of their kids’ rears.  Nature can be so relaxing – helped out, too, by a carefree handmade dress to make one feel wonderful!

Basic is Beautiful

Don’t you just hate it when a longtime favorite and much loved wardrobe staple of yours gives up its ghost?  Yeah, always a bummer!  My decade and a half staple – a bohemian-style, maxi length, lightweight denim skirt – ripped apart from too much love.  Well, for someone who sews all chances of having a replacement is not entirely lost.

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It took me two years to find the right pattern and fabric to finally have a lovely replacement that I love almost just as much as my original – this is saying a lot!  Sure, I had plans to make a pattern from my old favorite but I realized it might not be a bad thing to move on with my style and try something similar yet different at the same time.  Also, because one basic staple deserves another, I have my new denim skirt paired with a slightly seductive, vintage, knit white tee for another wardrobe filler.  I’m hoping my set has a slight nod to the 1970s era yet still stays modern.  To have a garment be an indispensable staple piece, yet also vintage and modern, is the best combo ever for those days when I want to blend in yet still wear styles which pay tribute to the past.

Every time I make something really needed and purposeful (not just what tickles my fancy), I realize how beautiful sewing the basics can be.  This is why my outfit (specifically my skirt) is part of the Petite Passions’ Wardrobe Builder Project for the month of May. As you can see, it is helping me get the motivation to build on my everyday casual wardrobe!

THE FACTS:McCall's 6623, year 1979-comp,w

FABRIC:  Skirt – 2 yards of a lightweight, light wash, denim chambray with scrap Kona cotton for the waistband lining; Top – less than one yard of a ribbed cotton knit

PATTERNS:  Skirt – Burda Style “Tiered Denim Maxi Skirt” #102 B, from April 2017;  Top – McCall’s #6623, year 1979

Tiered Denim Maxi Skirt 04-2017 #102BNOTIONS:  Besides the invisible zipper, which I bought because I don’t necessarily keep ‘specialty’ zips on hand, everything else needed was basic (thread, interfacing, bias tape) and came from on hand.

TIME TO COMPLETE:  The top was sewn a while back now, finished on August 24, 2015 after only 3 hours’ time.  The skirt took me about 5 hours to make and was finished on May 16, 2017.

DSC_0416a-comp,wTHE INSIDES:  My skirt is all clean inside with both French seams and bias tape while my knit top is raw edged inside (as it doesn’t fray).

TOTAL COST:  The top’s ribbed fabric was a miserable little scrap remnant – technically it was about one yard but was badly hacked into with all the corners squarely cut off.  See below the “tight squeeze” to fit the pattern pieces on it.  The knit was bought for about $2 when Hancock Fabrics was closing.  The denim was bought the year before from Jo Ann’s Fabric store for about $9 (more or less I don’t remember).  I suppose my outfit is about $12 but priceless in utility to me!    

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Now, as for any Burda Style pattern, printing and/or tracing is necessary to have a usable pattern to lay on your desired fabric.  My pattern was traced from the downloaded and assembled PDF bought at the online store but if you have a magazine issue, use a roll of medical paper to trace your pieces from the insert sheet.  It’s at this preliminary step that you pick out your proper size and add in your choice of seam allowance width.  A scissor with a magnetic ruler guide helps immensely to quicken along the step to getting a finished pattern prepped.  Sorry to repeat something you might already know, but this is just an “FYI” for those that don’t know.

There were only subtle changes that I made to the skirt for my version.  The main change, to lessen the gathers of the lower panel, was part taste.  I planned on doing that anyway, but the amount of the gathers was dictated by the fact I was working with only 2 yards of material while using a pattern calling for at least 3 yards.  I am a smaller woman, and on the edge of being petite height, so I figured such a full maxi skirt as the original design might be a bad idea.  I really do like the skirt fullness as it is now even if I did not get to choose exactly how I wanted it.  Sometimes “making do” works better than trying to start from scratch to be ‘perfect’.

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Other than changing the amount of gathers, I sewed the gathers onto the upper skirt piece like a normal seam rather than top-stitching on like the pattern called for.  This top-stitched panel would’ve created a frilly ruffle where the two panels came together.  I was decreasing the gathers for a slimmer skirt and a frill through the middle of a half-gathered panel would have messed with the silhouette.  This regular seaming also saved me the trouble of finishing the one edge of the gathered panel so I could equalize my time spent to invisibly hand-stitch down the hem.

I already took out 3 inches from the overall length but my hem even still became a wide 3 ½ inches.  This baby runs very long as if it is a “Tall” sized pattern.  It does sit on the hips, with the top of the skirt riding just below my true waist.  As one who wears a lot of vintage, which almost always has a high-to–true waist, I still like this feature which is more modern, it’s just a change for me (not a bad thing, as I said above).

DSC_0404a-comp,wAs I went through the extra effort to make no stitching visible, under stitching the facing at the waist and having a hand-done hem, I figured an invisible zipper here was the only way to go.  After having my last invisible zipper failing on me and trapping me in my dress back in 2012 (post on that here), I have taken a long hiatus from this specific notion but coming back to it has been a refreshing and rewarding success.  I love how you don’t see anything but the zipper pull…but, yes, I realize that’s why they are called invisible!

My top is the third time I have used McCall’s #6623 pattern – this is unprecedented for me!  (Here are my first and my second versions of this pattern.)  I still yet want to have the gumption to make and wear that strappy cold-shoulder version.  The tank is so lovely and basic I need to make a few of those in some basic colors.  For some reason I really love this one pattern, and it loves me by the way it fits me so darn well.

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I find this pattern interestingly unique, not just from the fact that each view top has its own pieces (none shared), but because of the small “From a Norton Simon Inc. Company” logo next to the McCall’s logo.  This pattern’s year, 1969, was a decade after Norton Simon himself retired from active involvement in his business.  What’s up with that?!

McCall's 6623, year 1979-comp,zoomNot too many people know that Norton Simon, the smart art collector and businessman behind Max Factor cosmetics, Avis Car Rental, and Canada Dry Corporation (to name a few), also controlled the McCall Corporation and all its publishing (magazines and such) between 1959 and 1969.  How I have not heard of this man, who seemed to have an influence in so much of the companies and products that are a part of our modern lives, before recently?  He was on the cover page of TIME magazine on June 4, 1965, in People magazine (1976), and even ran for the United States Senate (in 1970).  His conglomerate is now ranked 112th on FORTUNE’S list of the 500 largest American corporations    I wonder why this is the only McCall pattern I have seen with his naming rights on it.  See – patterns are so interesting in so many ways!

Sewing this top was super simple and easy.  This is the first time I have used this pattern un-altered.  I did have to add in snap on lingerie straps made from ribbon to anchor the shoulder to my underwear.  Otherwise the shoulders on this open-back hottie piece slide a bit all over the place.  Basic bias tape adds a bit of soft shaping and contrast finishing for the neck edges, and a little left chest pockets adds some small utilitarian interest.

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My biggest setback was working with the rib knit – a very first for me to work with.  I thought I had this pattern understood but not this time.  I had to sew the side seams several inches smaller than normal to accommodate the give of the ribbing.  It acts like a slinky toy!  It was a tough call to figure out the sweet spot between too loose of a fit and too snug.  I didn’t want the rib knit to lose its design when fitting over me yet I wanted it to be body complimentary without being a second skin.  After several stitchings, un-pickings, and re-stitching spells I like the balance I found.  This top does look so hilariously small on the hangar – the ribbing springs back so it seems like something for a 10 year old girl.  It also is best dried flat after washing.  The weirdness of the rib knit also meant all my hems are unfinished – not by choice but at least I think the raw edges look good on this occasion.  This quirky material has a definite personality!  Working with it was a definite learning curve.

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Between all the challenging and involved projects that I want to make (from my too numerous ideas), sewing basic necessities always is a pain to get around to.  Who completely wants to sew something merely because you need it, when nowadays ‘stuff’ is so easy and available to buy?  And yet, such sewing also always ends up so satisfying for me and it always amazes me.  The staple clothing necessities that you reach for everyday can be an uncommon source of creative pride and possess better individual style if you don’t exclude them from receiving the personal touch of hand sewing.  I’m practicing what I preach lately by giving away a good amount of the ready-to-wear that I do not like or use so that my ‘me-makes’ and my vintage pieces can take over my wardrobe.

Do you make your tees, and jeans, and anything else basic?  If yes, do you like them better than the ready-to-wear option?  Have you ever worked on sewing up a replacement for an old favorite garment?  Is sewing what you need something that you have a love or a hate attitude towards? Maybe, like me, you feel a bit of both?  What is your experience (if you have one) with rib knits?  One last query – has anyone else seen a McCall’s pattern with a “Norton Simon” logo?  If you have any feedback for these questions, please do share – I like to ‘hear’ what you have to say!  As always, thanks for reading.

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Escape and Evasion: a Post-WWII Map Blouse

A map can help you find your way, it can provide a safety net, be a memento, create a fashion statement, or even be the product of someone’s profession (cartography).  Believe me, a map is much more than markings and directions on material.  Are you ready for a trip?  Let’s have a go with a vintage blouse that incorporates all of those things I first listed, constituting the most out what truly is a map.

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The world is always changing, so a map necessarily documents a moment and place in time.  My blouse, although made in our modern times, pays tribute to 1946, and its post-World War II times and practices.

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:   100% cotton is the content for both the map fabric and the inner lining fabric.  The map fabric is a ‘Tim Holtz’ brand print, from his “Eclectic Elements Expedition” line, and it is very silky soft.  The lining is a beige tan batiste, tissue thin but also super soft.1692-Simplicity

NOTIONS:  I bought the buttons to specifically match with the top (I’ll explain my reasoning further down), and other than that I really needed only thread, which was already on hand

PATTERN:  Simplicity #1692, a 1944 pattern re-printed in 2013

TIME TO COMPLETE:  My blouse was completed in maybe 8 hours, and finished on September 8, 2014.

100_3760a-comp,wTHE INSIDES:  Nice and clean – the side seams are flat felled, the bottom hem is bias covered, and the shoulder seams are covered by the lining.

TOTAL COST:  The fabric was ordered from an online store and the “La Petite” buttons came from (now defunct) Hancock Fabrics for a total of about $25.

Now, I know history buffs out there like me will see my “Facts” and notice and say, “Hey, she’s making a Post-WWII 1946 blouse out of a war-time 1944 pattern!”  Well, yes, I know.  Many styles in fashion then did not have any radical changes during and right after the war, due to many factors.  It wasn’t until 1946 that rationing and “making-do” just began co-existing with a postwar boom all things – more patterns, new fashions, buying of material goods, and even a plethora of babies 😉  Besides, I adapted the pattern design to be more appropriately a 1946 style with its kimono-style cap sleeves and button back.  My adaptations to the pattern were based off of this old original 1946 silk chart blouse as seen in Jonathan Walford’s “Forties Fashion” book (below), as well as this vintage Globe novelty print 40s blouse seen here on Etsy.

Map blouse from 'Forties Fashion'

I luckily made all sorts of annotations to the pattern after my first and second versions and knew what to do to make my third time around the best success yet.  My notes of how to fit the pattern to myself helped me concentrate on changing the design and lengthening the set in sleeves to become another mid-1940’s classic style.  Rather than cutting the back bodice on the fold, I cut mine with a seam and extra seam allowance.  A long underlap was drafted, as was the skinny bias tubing, so I could have the back be button closed.  Sure it is somewhat of a contortion trick to close it on myself, but it is also very 40’s (and looks awesome).  Hubby always shakes his head at the things we women go through to make and wear these vintage fashions.

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The print is some sort of conglomeration of fragmented antiquated maps with wind info and some random highlighting of towns.  It has a nice earthy yet pastel-like background composed of the basic colors in traditional camouflage.  I would have preferred more of a topographical chart or a real 1940s WWII chart, but this is not the last time I intend to sew with maps, so perhaps next time I’ll get exactly what I would like.  On my blouse, the continent of North America with the USA is right over the heart on the left of my chest – at least this is just how I’d like it!

100_3762-comp,wAlthough my blouse is made from cotton fabric (albeit quite nice cotton), it is intended to imitate extant original Post-War clothing which had been made from no longer used/needed Escape and Evasion Charts.  The use of more aerial fighting, bombing, and reconnaissance necessitated maps to be the newest ‘not-to-be-without’ equipment for WWII.  These charts, nicknamed EVC’s, are not bombing aids yet they are also more than just maps.  By being printed with specialized information onto fabric they instantly become an all-in-one survival tool to help someone such as a downed pilot, a lost ground troop, or a POW evade danger and survive both the surroundings and possibly unfriendly people.  Navigation aids, terrain info, edible animals and plants, and crude personal care are listed.

Now, just to be clear, I am talking about the true EVC’s made by government cartographers, not the one’s made out of alternative materials by and for POWs attempting to escape incarceration and also not the maps for remaining alive in aquatic regions, although all of these do fall under the “SERE (Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape)” training military personnel receive.  That out of the way – originally, WWII EVC’s were small and either handed out or sewn as the lining to airmen’s jackets.  The Map pouchAmerican Charts were normally oiled rayon, while the charts issued elsewhere (mainly Britain and Australia) were pectin-coated silk.  The coating strengthened the material, kept the ink from running, and provided airmen with something rather flexible and non-crinkly (silent to use) yet waterproof so their chart could catch water and keep something dry.  The modern EVC’s are not only more detailed, but also made out of spun olefin, branded as Tyveck (house wrap), and have evolved into something as large as a blanket so they can also be used as a hammock, shelter, and bandage, to list a few out of many uses.

After the war, these charts because the source for much re-purposing, and during the war a hubby or sweetheart that no longer needed his chart could provide the rationed woman some precious extra material.  (See here what an old WWII charts looks like before being made into garment.)  Surplus and de-classified Evasion Charts were often a memorial of what a hubby and/or sweetheart endured, as well as silk or rayon that wasn’t going to be wasted.  Thus, so many of these special charts became clothing for a good number of women in the years following WWII.  I find it funny how most of the charts became underwear and lingerie – rather cheeky!  Visit my Pinterest board for EVC re-use to see more inspiration and info.

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Of all the re-using and re-fashioning that went on during WWII, Escape and Evasion charts are by far the most enthralling, most intriguing part, in my opinion.  What is so neat is that they are still useful today, being used after over 70 years!  It just goes to show the depth of history involved in things we take for granted in our everyday lives – maps, clothing, and just pure surviving.  Of all the novelty blouses that I could make, this one has the most passion behind it.  I hope this post made you think, and let me share with you about one of my favorite subjects!