Fall Back

I would really enjoy the season of fall much better if it wasn’t for Daylight Savings Time.  It has been observed in my country for just over a hundred years by now but I don’t care.  I detest the way just one little tweak to the timing of my day throws everyone in the family off for a while.  What about you?  By the time we are all free from our commitments for the day, we are left in early evening darkness.  So often in years before, we get stuck inside too early going stir crazy so it’s going to be real special here this year with the current limitations.  Time is a precious resource and I hate to waste it, especially not from being needlessly restless.   So – how about joining me in placating the misfortune of the autumn time change with some nice reminiscing to instead fall back in time?  Let’s check out some fall garments I sewed years past to keep me happy, warm, and looking good during such a transitional season. 

Just a forewarning – these are not the most spectacular things to share here on my blog, and being my older projects not up my current par of perfection.  Yet, it’s the basic stuff like this that becomes a tried and true dependable piece which has lasted me so many years.  Honestly, I feel like giving these garments a longevity award and not just a post!  The fact I am still able to wear and enjoy these garments for up to 16 years now has me realize that I am one of a small percentage of folks who could or would even do such a thing, so I hope I don’t seem out of touch here.  Blame it on my willingness to adjust, tailor, mend, and generally take care of these pieces over the years to keep them as something I even want to still enjoy.  This tendency is not a bad habit, though.  Being happy with what you have, being confident enough to be yourself, and being economical to mend and keep up what you already possess before buying new are all great to practice no matter the season or place, no matter your wealth of lack of it.  

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  The plaid skirt is a printed quilter’s cotton, lined in a cling-free poly in a beige color.  The top paired with the skirt is made of a polyester stretch suede, in a deep burgundy-cranberry.  The tweed flared skirt is a lofty, heavyweight acrylic blend, lined in a dark brown cling-free poly. The long half-circle skirt is a polyester micro suede with a ‘burnout’ floral print, lined in a cling-free poly in a tan color.

PATTERNS:  Butterick #3654, year 2002, bias flounce hem skirt, paired with a top using McCall’s #3655, year 2002.   Simplicity 4881, from 2003, a “tulip” hem skirt.  Simplicity #4543, from 2005, for a pull-on half circle skirt with the tummy panel.

NOTIONS:  Pretty simple – thread, a 7 inch zipper, and ½ inch elastic

TIME TO COMPLETE:  Each one of these skirts was a 2 hour project – easy peasy!  The stretch suede top took about 3 hours just because I had problems with the fitting and details, as I remember.  The top and skirt set was sewn circa 2004, while both the tweed skirt and the suede floral circle skirt were made circa 2006.

Where do I start?  I suppose I’ll begin with the full set I made – the suede top and the cotton plaid skirt.  This set is from a time when I survived off of versatile separates.  It was such a challenge to find either a top which fit me yet also matched a skirt I had made, or a skirt which suited my taste yet also looked good with a top or blouse I already had.  Back then I was just starting to branch out into more experimental sewing (such as hats) as well as beginning to try creating garments that needed me to figure out better tailoring and patterning skills (such as dresses and jackets).  The project choice for this outfit was therefore both benign and experimental for me.  The skirt was a safe bet.  I was most comfortable sewing them by then and it was simple enough that I chose to make it again in velvet for a Christmas party (posted here).  Stretch suede is a novel material to pick for a top, and I used a pattern designed for much stretchier knits so I needed courage and forethought.  I was pushing boundaries and figuring things out first hand…and I succeeded.   

I wisely went up a whole size and then some as the suede did not have the stretch rate the pattern recommended.  The slight stretchiness to the suede means I have no closures and this is a pullover top.  Yet, the material was dense enough that I was confused what stitch to use and I chose a stable straight stitch, finishing off the inner raw edges with my mom’s serger (overlocking machine).  The smooth satin underside to the suede is what I feel against my skin on the inside and it is fabulous!

I originally made the sleeves extra-long so I could have room to choose some novelty hemming or whatever interesting detail struck my fancy, as I thought.  Turned out, I shirred up the inner wrist area for a bit of a different look while still keeping the hem up and giving me plenty of extra reach room.  A small strip of hem facing keeps those gathers in place.  The sleeve cap did not stretch into the armscye like a normal knit, yet I did not like the appearance of a gathered sleeve cap.  Thus I made small pleats to take in the excess.  This is not the proper way to do such a fix, but it worked and it nicely squared off the sleeve tops for a defined shoulder line.

I originally cut the neckline really close to the throat at first because – like the sleeves – I wanted to experiment.  Turned out, I created a wide, squared off neckline, and finished it by sewing down and turning inside a strip of tiny bias tape.  It was not your run-of-the-mill tee but still simple enough to pair with many different me-made skirts…in other words, just what I wanted! 

The skirt is basically everything the same as the velvet version I posted here.  It has a pull-on elastic waist for ¾ of the waistband, with the front over the tummy being a smooth panel.  There is full lining which ends just above the hem ruffle.  The skirt was lengthened through the body because I thought the bias ruffle would look weird at any other length other than knee length or ankle length – and ankle length would be more elegant, warmer on my legs, and not so sporty.  This is a comfy but not dumpy skirt that has such a subtle plaid.  The orange and burgundy print reminded me of rows of stitching up close! 

The body of the skirt was cut on the bias for a cross-wise plaid but it also gives a better body complimentary fit.  I have a booty in this!  Also, too, a straight and long skirt like this always made me think that I appeared taller – and this was important to a girl who was always the shortest in her class and too often taken for granted growing up.  Now I have high heels which fill in for those silly feelings, he he. 

Nevertheless, I still appreciate this skirt, although the elastic waist limits how I can wear this according to my preferences of today and what tops I now have that go with it.  This is why I sewed a top for it back then, one that did not need to be tucked in.  The top has such a rich texture and color and it was completely personalized according to my own inventions!  The skirt’s bottom flounce floofs up when I walk in a way that tickles the little girl inside me which still appreciates ruffles and such frills.  Together, these two items are like the best of the colors on trees’ fading leaves in fall. 

Next, I’ll talk about the tweed skirt.  Out of all the things I had made before I started blogging, this particular skirt is by far my favorite item.  It is probably also my most frequently worn self-made skirt, even over my vintage skirts.  It is something that I reach for again and again even today.  The variety of colors in the tweed pair with so much in way of tops, blouses, and suit blazers while the lovely silhouette is the only one of its kind in my wardrobe.  To my knowledge this shape of a skirt is called a “tulip hem” because it looks like an upside down opening flower bud.  It is slimming yet also easy to move in. 

The original way I had this skirt go on was with a simple elastic waist, much like the skirt above.  This tweed is rather heavy weight, especially with almost 3 yards of fabric needed for it, and I remember the elastic waist was always slinking down on me when I would wear it.  Several years ago now, I completely reworked that waist to turn this into a smooth fitting, side zipper closure skirt.  It is much more of a professional skirt his way, and better for tucking tops in, as well as stable on my body.  No more drooping skirt! 

Otherwise, I kept everything the way I had made it originally from before I reworked the waist.  This is fully lined, but even still, tweed ravels like crazy as does poly lining.  Thus, all seams had been cleanly serged (overlocked) and top stitched down.  I kept the pattern’s intended proportions and length of view D, where the flare begins above the knee in the lower part of the upper thigh.  I did not do any adjustments and made an exact copy of the pattern. 

My fabric is heavy so the skirt has a slightly different fall at the panels than what is seen on the model images on the cover (their skirts are a crepe or lightweight silky print).  I personally like the structure of my version to this pattern better.  It reminds me more of a suiting skirt rather than one with a romantic flair.  This is what has lent it to be such a go-to piece.  It is feminine yet serious, fancy yet not pretentious, versatile but not overly simple.  I definitely recommend you to find this pattern and try it for yourself.  Early 2000 era patterns are super cheap right now!

Finally, the last item in this post is another suede creation – a pull-on half circle skirt.  It has a smooth tummy panel which extends down to the hipline, where the circle portion joins in along a straight, un-gathered seam.  I lined the skirt from the hipline seam down, and finished the suede in a skinny 1/8 inch hem.  This was such a tricky, frustrating material to work with!  The weave was so tight, even with a sharp point needle my sewing machine didn’t want to poke stitches through.  The suede stuck to itself at every turn yet was as soft as butter so I couldn’t always be sure I wasn’t sewing over a wrinkle.  Luckily there were very few seams to the design.

This was total whim project from what I vaguely remember.  I saw this fabric in the store, it tickled my fancy and I immediately knew what I wanted to sew with it.  I whipped it together pretty much as soon as it was bought home, even before washing it (I always wash my fabrics before sewing with them).  No matter how much I do like the final skirt that might not have been the best idea.  The suede sticks like Velcro to most any top I wear with it and I made my easy-but-ubiquitous elastic waist – again.  Sigh.  Thus, I feel restricted to only sweater tops or blazers over this skirt.  The basic colors in the skirt lend it to only match with similar browns or ivory tones – not very versatile.  Oh well.  I do love how swishy and romantic it is – so perfect for twirling!  It is a subtle kind of floral, too.  Also, it is in the on-trend copper tone which is one of the “it” colors of this year and midi length dresses and skirts are coming back.  See?  I am now on trend wearing something I made for myself 14 years ago.  Weird, right?!

As much as these items are something I probably would not make today, I can’t help but give my younger self some credit for my sewing choices.  I think the fact I could make items which I can enjoy for such an extended period of my life must have laid the ground work for how and what I sew today.  Granted, these are ‘modern’ pieces from before a time when vintage fashion was something I wanted to be in for more than just for going “in costume” to living history events.  In a time when day-to-day reality feels weird and living in 2020 is like an apocalyptic movie, I find some comfort in connecting with my past by wearing my older creations.  Not forgetting where you came from can help you move ahead in the present, even if the channel for that happens to be through clothing.  Sometimes you have to fall back to move forward.

My tweed skirt matches well with my handmade 80’s Givenchy blazer, sewn two years back now.

Burda’s Dupe Wrap Skirt and Tie-On Blouse

Okay, okay, I fully realize I have an addiction to anything remotely purple, but I’m definitely not going to do anything about it.  I’m just going to keep on wearing what makes me happy!  Yet, I am at least trying to find new shades of that color to love, such as the fuchsia and burgundy colors in my last two posts.  This modern Burda Style outfit which I made a few years back definitely falls in that category, and the fact that they are very useful yet elegant separate pieces makes them perfect for many seasons and occasions.

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  2 ½ yards of a crinkled polyester print for the blouse and just under 2 yards of a crepe back satin poly for skirt

PATTERN:  Both patterns are from Burda Style are also both from their December 2015 edition.  The blouse is #124 and the skirt is #115

NOTIONS:  All I needed was lots of thread and one zipper!

TIME TO COMPLETE:  Both garments were finished in November 2017 – 5 hours was spent to make the skirt and 8 hours went towards the blouse.

THE INSIDES:  My blouse is entirely French seamed inside while my skirt has bias bound side seam edges.

TOTAL COST:  As these were clearance fabrics, bought so many years back at the now defunct Hancock Fabrics, this whole outfit probably cost me less than $20…but honestly I don’t remember anymore!

Even though my entire outfit’s fiber content is polyester, I find both pieces are more comfortable to wear than your ‘normal’ man-made material.  The blouse’s fabric has a wonderful crushed texture to it that makes ironing non-issue and keeps it from feeling uncomfortably clingy to the skin.  It floats weightlessly around my body for a very sexy slinkiness.  Even though I had several yards of fabric, and the sleeves alone took up almost a yard, I still have some significant blouse material leftover that will just have to wait for a future project to finish it off.

The skirt’s fabric is soft, flowing, and very good quality.  It has a darker, more raisin or rich wine color, with a satin side and a lighter, more purple toned, buff crepe side.  I used the satin side facing out on the lower body of the skirt, while the buffed crepe side went towards the hip panel and the waistband.  This is the fourth time I am using this fabric – the first time was to make the ‘pocket’ flaps and the belt for my 1955 Redingote jacket (post here), the second time was for this 1950s dress slip, and the third time was as the contrast for this early 1930s dress.  I truly squeezed out every inch of potential my small 3 something yard cut of fabric!

The patterns pieces and the construction for these two separate pieces was so much simpler than it might appear.  I highly recommend them.  Both have a generous fit and came together in no time, with little need for extra shaping.  For the blouse, that is understandable because it is not supposed to be fitted.  For the skirt, the loose fit is because it is meant to sit below the waist and sit around the hips.  The fact the front mock wrap look to the skirt is really only a deep pleat not only makes for full leg coverage but also easy sewing.  I could have technically gone down a size for both the blouse and skirt instead of choosing my ‘normal’ size and still have room probably.  I’m just happy with to have them and be wearing them.  For these designs, a well-tailored fit is not as important or glaringly obvious.

My only variance from the original design of either piece was to add ties to each end of the blouse and adapt the sleeve hem for a bias band cuff.  The sleeves were way too fussy and so very long the way Burda designed them, so I cut off the excess fabric and gathered the hem ends into self-drafted wide bias bands.  A mere side button closing wasn’t going to do the trick, neither was just wrapping it under a waistband, I thought. So the ties I added help add to the versatility of this blouse because now I can tie it more than one way!  The front can be crossed like an X, or one side over the other like a regular wrap top.  Many looks out of one top is further achieved by switching up what I wear underneath – especially when that is my 1950s slip made out of the same material as my skirt!

If I had been using a solid color material for the blouse, I might have chosen to asymmetrically button the wrap front much like this vintage 1940s pattern below, Butterick #3964.  Truth be told though, I think this Burda top is a call back to the 1970s era (look at Butterick 6887 pattern as an example) with its full sleeves, loose style, and the crazy blocked print fabric I used.  I can just picture a Disco dancer wearing this with some bell bottoms!  The blouse is fabulous to move around in, with full freedom of movement and a dramatic swish with every sway of my arms.

The skirt still remains controlled in shape for every movement, and is a great restrained contrast to the top.  It strikes me as quite classy, especially in such a rich color.  I love the fact that I don’t have to worry about flashing too much leg with the faux wrap appearance.  (Of course, Burda shows you how to make the skirt have a full slit if you want.)  Even though the horizontal hip panel doesn’t visually minimize that widest section of my body, I do think that the restrained skirt and the blouse wrapping around the waist evens proportions out.

The skirt also looks best with snug body fitting sweater tops in the winter or light colored, simple tops in the summer, to again both even out the wide waistband and dark tone.  Its pattern recommendations call for materials with a heavier weight (woolens or even a sequined knit) than a silky polyester as I chose, and I found through trial that it’s a good idea, after all – it would keep the skirt in place on the hips just from the weight, for one thing.  The longer, ankle length version has a silhouette even more tapered down to a skinny hem and is so pretty for an evening style.  It makes me want to revisit this pattern in the future.

This staying-at-home business is turning my mind to try all sorts of fashion ideas.  You, know, I’m always on the fence about whether or not I prefer a loose, flowing, romantic fashion or a well-tailored, precisely fitted outfit.  Through this quarantine, I’ve been going from a new fascination with the 1920s era to my good-old-standby favorite decade the 1940s, from a bold and clingy t-shirt dress (previous post) to this vintage-inspired yet modern combo of easy separates.  Sewing is one of the many facets of life right now keeping me sane, just as blogging does, and in between it all I am trying new things yet still endeavoring to not forget myself in all this craziness.  My sewing, just the same as anybody else’s, is uniquely individual and it’s my visual manifestation of what’s knocking around in my head!  What’s getting you by these last few months? Do you notice your style preferences changing at all?

Conifer Night

Conifers are the mysterious ones among their fellow hard woods, the trees – they stand fully clothed when others go naked in hibernation.  They jealously kill the grass over their ‘feet’, have unfriendly prickles for ‘leaves’, and cast mellow, unholy shadows when they are planted in a huddle together.  Their perennial greenness is cheering, though – providing color and shelter outdoors in winter, the resiliency they represent ends up decorating our living quarters at the holidays!  Combining an overcast rainy evening with a patch of winter green becomes embodied together in this comfy set of viridescent and navy hues.

After my last 1940s suit from post WWII times, I’d like to share another focused on a slightly earlier time frame of the late 30’s to early 1940’s.  The now past holidays for all things green (St. Patrick’s day and Christmas) originally inspired me to keep to a certain color scheme linking each piece together.  This set is sans jacket, but at least it does have a statement hat!  This is also put together (like the last one I posted) with a mix of re-fashioning and sewing from scratch.  Just the same, it is also for winter, again composed of a span of years and fashion influences, and has a blouse pattern from 1941 as its common separate.  A vintage look, or a new outfit is only a re-fashion or a simple sewing project away!  This was relatively easy and fun to whip together, with only one pattern needed and lots of inspiration.  I do like to keep my styling connected to the past for the best practical glamor.

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  a semi-sheer 30% silk/70% cotton blend for my blouse, a cotton flannel for my skirt, and a poly felt for my hat

PATTERN:  Simplicity #3714, year 1941, for the blouse.  The skirt was made with no pattern. The hat is loosely based off of Vogue #7464, view D

NOTIONS:  I bought the base for the hat at Wal-Mart (sounds weird, but I’ll explain down below), but everything else cane from my stash – the buttons are vintage “Schwanda” brand from the 1950s, the zipper is vintage (metal teeth), the wire for the hat came from hubby’s workbench, the interfacing was scraps on hand, and matching thread was already here.

TIME TO COMPLETE:  The blouse was made in about 15 hours and finished on December 18, 2017.  My skirt’s re-fashion took me about 6 hours, while I spent no more than 4 hours to make the hat – both finished only days before Christmas 2017.

THE INSIDES:  French seams for the blouse, bias finish for the skirt

TOTAL COST:  The hat cost me a total of $5; the blouse cost me $6 for two yards; I’m counting the skirt as free as it had been on hand for so long.  Thus my total outfit cost is under $12 – how awesome is that!

Although this is a winter outfit, these pieces are quite versatile on their own, especially the lovely blouse in its soft silk blend ordered direct from China!  The way silk breathes and adjusts to one’s body temperature makes it fabulous and perfect for any and every outdoor or indoor climate.  When combined with the easy care and softness qualities of cotton, it is such a winning blend (would be perfect for some heavenly bedsheets!).  This blouse can definitely be dressed up but also be quite casual, especially when used as a layering piece under a sweater.  Having semi-transparent sleeves keeps me covered in a very lightweight, yet dressy way that also both keeps me at a good temperature and are easy to roll up to short length for summer.  I am slightly obsessed with its creamy celery green color and loving what it does for my light olive skin tone.  This blouse is really the one new piece of my outfit that will be a dependable workhorse in my wardrobe, besides being the one linchpin which inspired the whole set’s idea.

The rest of my ensemble is from items on hand – even my true vintage gloves and earrings but especially in regards the skirt!  Originally, it was something I haven’t put on in years, though I did wear it many times when I was in my early to mid-teens.  I was more of a wall-flower then, not as comfortable in my skin, and was always cold in the winter.  If I went out in the cold, I liked my skirts long so I could wear boots and pants underneath, and I liked them basic because I probably preferred to keep my coat on (whether inside or out) and not be seen anyway.  The skirt was ankle length, A-line shape, with a wide elastic waistband and in-seam pockets on both sides.  Yet, it was not worn enough to pill up or look as well-loved as it was…prime for a refashion.  I know the skirt is definitely for cold temperatures being a flannel, yet it’s lightweight enough to not completely be a one season piece, either…which makes my sewing the most bang for the little time spent to freshen it up.  A good rich toned plaid is one of the many fabric weaknesses of mine, and perfect for the 1940s, so a basic WWII era skirt it was going to be so it could match with my silk-blend blouse.

The pattern for my blouse has been used twice already, for my basic brown version and my “Leave Her to Heaven” look-alike.  I have this pattern down pat, but I love it no less for being the third time around…it’s a winner.  However, I did decide to tweak it a bit.  I spread the fullness of the thick single shoulder darts into three tiny darts of descending lengths which get shorter as they get closer to the sleeve caps.  It is an understated detail that feels very feminine and tailored.  I also added a bit more length in the sleeves with a little more fullness.  The sleeves are single layer of fabric so they are slightly sheer and delicate, perfect for the puffier shape.  The main body of the blouse has been double layered so that it would be both opaque as well as darker in color.  Instead of cufflink holes, as I do on most of my dressy blouses, I chose some wonderful pastel flower shaped buttons from my Grandma’s stash.  They really emphasize the creamy, bright color of the fabric in a way that cheers me up in winter and makes it perfect for summer, too.

My skirt was a pretty basic re-fashion, all I was basically doing was reshaping it.  I cut off the elastic waist first (keeping the side pockets), then chopped of only enough from the long hem to make a new, wide, interfaced waistband.  However, I needed to tailor the waist before adding that waistband!  This was the tricky part, trying to figure out how to take the waist in and how much to bring in.  This step took way too long and caused a lot of unpicking.  I had plenty of other more interesting ideas (pleats, a placket) that I tried before I settled for the basic, darted straight line skirt style you see.  Just a simple hem made, the zipper and waistband set on and my refashion might not look that dramatically different from its the original state.  It was merely fine-tuned and I hope classic enough to not just be a “vintage” style item.  Just imagine my skirt paired with tights on my legs and platform shoes or slip-on mules topped with a modern oversized sweater and a big belt…yup, it should be pretty variable.

Now, my hat is definitely and unequivocally old-style.  I have long admired the late 30’s (see this article) and early 1940s oversized drama hats.  This hat style seems to go by several names – most frequently called either the pancake hat or beret.  It just kind of subconsciously seeped into my realization to just start with a placemat. It’s round and lightweight and the perfect base for that kind of hat, but then again this is not the first placemat hat I’ve made (see this one here).  First I covered the hat in felt, but that was way too plain.  I had to spice it up.  I pleated the felt in an Art Deco style throwback in three tiny pintucks that angle in to disappear before they reach the other edge.  Art Deco details persisted through the 30’s into the post-WWII times, mostly in the built environment, so the pintucks call to mind my love of architecture.  A sculpted hat is sort of like architecture the way they are structured works of art, sometimes reaching for the skies, and craftily perched on the human head the way buildings cling and hold onto God’s good earth no matter what the angle.  I actually need my giant hat pin to keep this one on my head.

I wanted to make sure the placemat kept its shape, so, before I sewed the bottom half of the hat to it, I hand tacked an electrical wire to the underneath edge.  This was a good idea that ended up being a bad idea.  Electrical wire was the scrap I most immediately found on my hubby’s workspace and it was much too heavy for the job…why I need my hat pin.  I should have used my lightweight floral wire instead (as I don’t have any proper millinery wire).  We live and learn, and although this was not the best success, it is neither a failure.  It is a very wearable experiment that I love.  It turned out 100% better than my husband had expected and cost me pittance so what could be more awesome than that?!  I now had the perfect finish to my outfit and tried a new hat style I have long admired, besides learning what to do the next time!  The little silly hat front décor is straight out of my head, also made out of the same felt, and merely something cute and decorative to break up the overwhelming shape.

I love practicing the idealistic challenge and thrifty, global conscious practice of taking my wardrobe from years past and things on hand to use with my talents to update it for my current life and fashion tastes.  It’s not because it’s the new “in” thing to do, though…neither are we on that tight of a budget.  It’s purely because I want to.  I have been doing this for so many years, way before it was a trend, I am used to looking for what is on hand before I buy.  My husband calls it a version of shopping…where I go downstairs and rummage through my stash of unworn, but sentimentally attached garments I no longer want to wear the way they are to find something “free” to rework it and feel like I end up with a “new” piece of clothing.  Add in a fully new, made-from-scratch item, like my blouse, which was easy and fast to make in a natural fiber, and top it off with a luxurious statement hat made from ridiculously simple home decorating supplies on hand…and I get my fashion and overall creative fix satisfied.  You don’t need much money or supplies to be crafty and start sewing.  There’s a bounty of stuff nearby somewhere just waiting for a second chance.

 

“School Teacher” 1940’s Suit Set

So many times, more than I can tell you, I hear from people who meet me, “…and, you’re a school teacher?”  As if it’s a half statement, that’s still a half question.  I really don’t know why this is – I do like tutoring but maybe it’s the eye glasses, he he!  Nevertheless, I’m embracing the school teacher vibes this time – the vintage 1940’s way!  My teacher’s outfit is authentically completed by a vintage oversized key brooch on my lapel, true 40’s alligator leather heels, and a post-WWII school building as our photo shoot backdrop.

This 40’s suit is achieved from an eclectic mix of vintage and vintage repro, sewing and refashioning.  The jacket is a true vintage piece that had seen better days (sadly), so I refashioned it using the skirt to salvage something wearable.  The skirt is made from a modern re-issued Simplicity pattern and some polyester plaid.  The blouse is made from a true vintage pattern and classic cotton for a basic, versatile wardrobe staple.  All these pieces have differing years in the 1940s as their sources.   Together, I end up with a cohesive 1940’s suit that is warm and classy to wear in the winter, and something I love to wear!

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  The blouse is cotton broadcloth, the skirt is a poly suiting, and the vintage jacket is a wool-rayon blend twill or gabardine

PATTERNS:  Simplicity #3714, year 1941, for the blouse (the legs on the cover women are intolerably, ridiculously long!); Simplicity #4044, a 2006 reprint of a 40’s pattern, now out of print

NOTIONS:  I had all the thread I needed, I used a modern zipper in the skirt, modern shoulder pads for replacement in the jacket, and new two-tone metal buttons (with an open filigree middle!), with bias tape packs to make all the insides nice and finished.  The only real vintage notion used here was the buttons on my blouse – they were from the stash of hubby’s Grandmother.

TIME TO COMPLETE:  The jacket was re-fashioned in about 6 hours and finished on January 8, 2016.  The skirt came together in about 4 hours on October 24, while the brown blouse was made in 8 to 10 hours and finished on November 27, both in 2015.

THE INSIDES:  The blouse and the skirt are all nicely bias bound with lace hem tape.  The jacket’s lining covers up all inner seams.

TOTAL COSTThe vintage suit was bought for $15, the cotton was maybe $10 for 1 ½ yards, and the plaid suiting was on clearance at Jo Ann’s Fabrics at $10 for 2 yards.  A total of $35!

Before my re-fashion, a beat up mess of a suit set was offered to me for a small amount during one visit to a local vintage re-sale shop.  The owner knew I sew.  She gave me one of those “Buy this if you think you can do something with it or else I’ll probably end up throwing it away, but I did spend some good money on this” offer.  The shop owner was thankfully very forthright letting me know the condition history of the suit set.  The suit was originally so dirty when she got it there was ‘no choice’ but to throw it in the wash machine…which ended up shrinking the wool, making the lining’s stitching to fall apart and the metal buttons rust, thus causing brown staining.  She had then spray painted the buttons silver to cover the rust.  Ugh!  That one wash sure got the jacket clean but caused a MESS of problems for me to fix.  The shoulders pads had balled up and fallen apart inside, as well.  The left sleeve to the jacket was chewed up, but not by moths.  It looked like it had been caught in some machinery or run across something sharp that tore it up all the way down the underside from the elbow to the wrist.  Other than the sleeve, though, the body was luckily free of holes or fading.  The matching skinny straight skirt was generally fine, with a few fade spots and random holes.

The suit did fit me and with its lovely design lines and details, and felt I had to save it for all its potential still left.  I guess it’s like going to “just look” at a new puppy – I tried it on, so I was hooked.  The capability to give it the attention I felt it deserved is well in my ballpark, anyway.  The bittersweet fact is that many vintage suits do not have their matching skirt as this one, but that skirt was unfortunately sacrificed for the jacket to save face.  I was hopeful, but slightly doubting my efforts would turn out so well.

As it had been washed once already, I took the old buttons off, added stain remover to take out the rust marks, and washed it once again.  With the lining was loose, I could reach right into the jacket and take out the old shoulder pads and unpick the sleeves.  I unpicked them completely to use the pieces as a guide to trace out a pattern.  The new sleeves have their bias slightly off due to the size restrictions of the skinny skirt, but are overall the exact same.  Then, with the sleeve set in, new shoulder pads, and the lining all stitched up by hand, and the new buttons (pic below) as the icing on the cake, I must say this was an amazing renewal for a formerly desperate vintage item.  Now, with a new separates sewn to match, it really can shine again for years to come in my wardrobe.

The best basic perk is that it is nice to have a new suit jacket without all the effort of starting from scratch.  Besides – they just don’t make them like they used to anyway – in way of styling, fit, and material!  It’s more like the weight of a coat, it’s so lofty!  I am amazed at how sturdy this jacket is to have survived everything it has and still polish up like this.  It’s amazing enough to have something from the 40’s last until today as it is.  I do really think, from the look of the inside seams, the shoulder pads, and the lack of a label, that this could have been private seamstress or tailor-made, but it’s done so well, it’s hard to tell.  As it is now, how unique is a part me-made, yet still vintage garment?!  It’s ‘true-vintage-with-my-personal-touch’, I guess.

There are many reasons why I absolutely LOVE this blouse.  Firstly, it’s in a nice rich earth tone – not ugly or boring and uncomplimentary as some solid browns can be, but it has many undertones that I notice every time I wear it with a different color scheme.  Pictures do not do it justice.  Not your basic dirt shirt here!  Also, it was an easy make, coming together in no time, and it’s perfect for layering with the slimmed down details.  It’s a true 40’s pattern, yet without being as obviously vintage as some others, as this one’s lacking a giant sized collar and gathers in the body.  There still are the gathered sleeve caps, but there is giant darts that shape the chest from the bust up to the shoulder tops.  Looking at the pattern envelope front, this is primarily because it is designed to go under a jumper, but to me it is just as good on its own to change up my vintage style.  The simplified, toned-down details make this versatile to customization.  With a tweak here and a variation here, I can have a different style.  This time, nevertheless, I stuck to the original design and left it unchanged.

However, the best perk is that this pattern fits me like it was designed for my body in mind, and I can use it without needing to adjust anything.  Finding such a pattern in the world of sewing is a real treat.  They’re a true gem to hold onto (and copy!) when you have one, especially when it comes to vintage patterns, as sizing and fit standards have changed throughout the decades, and yet even for today as modern wearing ease can be unpredictable.  For this blouse pattern, I can just lay the tissue pieces out, cut it out, and whip it together, almost like I don’t really have to think much at all to do it.  I suppose the greatest demonstration for how much I treasure this pattern is the fact I have made three different versions of blouses using it, as you will see in the next few posts.  I really have been meaning to make the jumper, too, as I like the rest of the pattern so much!

The skirt was another quickie project, thankfully.  When making your own suit set, even though I didn’t start from scratch for the suit coat, sewing more than one garment to have an outfit can become wearisome by the time you come to the second or third item!  This is partly why I made sure that the skirt was so easy-to-make!  I kind of knew how this skirt would generally run a bit roomy, as I have made the trousers from the same pattern, so I had the assurance of what size to choose to fit as well as really liking the front curving detailing to the waistband!  I also love this skirt – it is a go-to item that matches with lot of other items that I have and has a nice dressed-up look without being too formal.

To make up for my limited fabric amount and to match up the plaid in a more pleasing manner, I went rogue against the grain line recommendations.  Don’t judge me here, please!  I rarely do this and then it’s only when I have thought things through.  The fabric was a tight, rather stiff man-made polyester so it was not going to have much of a grain line from the fabric, so I merely stuck with matching the plaid up well.  In order to fit the two skirt pattern pieces on my yard and s half, I stuck with the same tact as some of my other 40’s plaid skirts.  The A-line shape is emphasized by having the plaid line up horizontally on the side seams, while the plaid miters together at an angle in the middle front and back seams.  For a fabric more drapey, this layout probably would not work as well, but I like making the most of the little of what I had to make an idea work.

The finely detailed and openly-spaced plaid lends an interesting visual texture to the suit set, I think.  At first I wasn’t sure that such strong colors on my top half would overwhelm the muted but busy skirt fabric.  However, the plaid does have the tendency to look weird from a distance in the full shot pictures for some reason!  There is a sneaky bit of turquoise in the plaid actually, if you look up close.

As I mentioned at the beginning of my post, this is the first time I feel I have been able to assemble a cohesive outfit from garments across the entire decade of the 1940s.  The blouse is from the beginning of the era – year 1941 – when many styles were still very 30’s inspired, fully feminine and dramatically distinctive in the decade.  The suit is I suppose from circa 1946, when extra fabric was again allowed, as it has a longer length, flared peplum, and decorative pocket lapels.  The skirt is (again, from my estimation) a little later than the suit, circa 1947 or 1948, especially with the slightly longer length.  It was common for a woman from back then of the 1940s to have worn garments many years old already, but with all the inventiveness, the refashioning, and desire to not publicly show that rationing was putting a cinch in their fashion life, I imagine an outfit that spans 7 years might have been a stretch.

To me, I see set differences every two years at a time in the styles of the 1940s (such as hem lengths, sleeve styles, body emphasis), but I will leave a discussion of this for another time.  I will say that, for some reason, it seems the conventional stereotype for the 1940’s seems to be circa 1945, when skirts were quite slim and under the knee, as if the wartime fashion was the benchmark for the era.  In reality, there was so much variety in the decade that a dress for 1940 compared to one from 1949 would and could totally confuse someone as to how to “do” 40’s fashion.  There was as much going on in history at the time as there was in the garment realm, and so 40’s style can be all over the place!  There is no “one way”, and that’s the beauty of how the 1940’s can appeal to so many people with so many individual style tastes and body shapes.

I always like to respect the style differences I notice in each year of the 40’s because I see it as important to realize the rhyme and reason behind them.  However, my sewing is about personalizing fashion for me – after all I am the one making things – and learning and feeling fulfilled are the greatest perks I enjoy about it along the way.  Thus, I enjoy the fact that I am able to a slightly less predictable style of a blouse from pre-war, and incorporate it with a skirt from post-war, and a suit blazer from the very end of the time of the fighting and rationing.  I certainly did take a very “made do and mend” 1940’s attitude to the pitiful condition of the jacket as I found it!  I hope the original owner of this blue suit would be proud at how I saved it to reinvent a new suit set 70 years later.  1940’s year differences, modern fabrics, vintage tailoring, self-made fashion, and a refashioning mentality have all made peace together with my outfit!