Multi-Purpose 1971 Jiffy Garment

All I know is that it fits, looks great, and it is in a peacock print (my favorite – see this post) lined in fabric of the color turquoise (another favorite). Can’t go wrong there! Whether it is a dress, or a tunic, or a jumper depends on the weather and how I feel like wearing the garment. That is the versatility of my newest 1970s sewing creation.

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THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  The printed fashion fabric is a 100% cotton from the quilting department, and the lining inside is a cotton blend, twill-looking gabardine solid.Simplicity 9461, year 1971, Jiffy dress or tunic or jumper & pants-comp

NOTIONS:  None were needed to buy ‘cause all I needed was thread…pretty simple, right? It was my decision later to use some bias tape on hand to finish off the armhole edges.

PATTERN:  Simplicity #9461, year 1971, a “Super Jiffy” pattern.

TIME TO COMPLETE:  Only about 4 hours were put into making this dress/jumper/tunic thing. It was done in one afternoon and evening on December 3, 2015.

THE INSIDES:  What insides? Everything is tucked inside itself.

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TOTAL COST:  Maybe $8.00 for the gabardine and a few more dollars for the printed cotton.

This little number is kind of a mystery fashion item – one of the reasons why I wanted to try it especially since it’s a one piece “Super Jiffy” pattern. In other words, I’m not committing much time and not cutting into my fabric much since this line of patterns seems to frequently be a large portion manipulated into fitting with clever darts and shaping (see this other 70’s “Super Jiffy” dress). Anyway, what is the real point to this? It does make for a really cute dress, and is decent as a jumper, but the wrap doesn’t close as much as I had thought it would. The 70’s did have some trends of slightly nonsensical layers, such as short cropped sweater vests over blouses or skirts over pants. I will need to wear tights, pants, shorts, or a mini skirt under this for decency’s sake. Maybe I’ll even have to whip up the pants provided in the pattern for full retro effect.

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My pattern is in junior’s proportions, so I had to do some interesting and successful grading up. As this pattern is one big tissue piece, at first I thought I couldn’t just add the amount needed like regular patterns…but then I thought back, “Why not?!” Time for some unwilling slashing to the pattern! So I cut the vertical center front line apart (where the two front cross over) and added in ¼ of my total amount added in, and another ¼ of the total amount was added to the vertical back seam, turning it into something I cut on the fold (rather than having a center back seam like the pattern directs). Then just like the other 60’s and 70’s junior patterns I’ve done (see here or here), I added in 2 inches horizontally across the chest between the shoulder and the bust to lower all the bust, waist, hip, and hem lines in one simple step.

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If you have a strong aversion to doing darts, then this pattern is not for you because they are quite plentiful. However, the darts are practically the only work this garment involves. My consolation to sewing all the darts (and I had to do double because the lining is a second mirror of the dress/jumper) was the final way the garment fits so well. This is seriously the best fitting Jiffy pattern I’ve made yet. Some of those darts are in slightly unusual directions, but they do their job very well – the designers were smart here.

As I mentioned already, the lining is like sewing a second dress/jumper, so as to face the two right sides together, sew along the entire outer edge, leaving a small opening to turn inside out and top-stitch things in place. This dress/jumper could easily been made reversible doing it this way (already did that here), but I have plenty of garments in solid turquoise so I didn’t do this because I really wouldn’t wear it that way. Take note that making an entire second mirror garment for a whole body lining was entirely my idea. The pattern only provides for facing to the neckline/front closure edge and the armholes. Many times I opt out of facings, feeling like they are too fiddly sometimes, but as I didn’t use facings to this pattern I’m not including this in the same pool. The peacock cotton was very this and like Velcro to whatever else it touched except for the gabardine (or polyesters) so it needed to be lined. As my last step, I used simple single fold bias tape to turn under the edges of the armholes in lieu of the facings, too.

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The button at the tab is completely for show and the real closure system is really hidden underneath. When wearing this as a jumper, I seem to need slightly more room than when just wearing as a summer dress. Thus I made to closure system adjustable by having the inner side have lovely aqua ribbons and under the outer tab there is more than one position of hooking for the waistband-style eye. By the way, the unworkable front button is the same as the decorative one used on another turquoise jumper garment – my ’67 jumper. This is the end of these same buttons, don’t worry…it was a two pack with no more to come.

I’m still unsure if this project is done until I can completely make up my mind as to whether or not to add on the hand level side pocket. I don’t know how much wear this dress/jacket will get (the gauge for whether or not to put more work in). Goodness knows, I’ve got the extra fabric for a pocket and can pull out the pattern whenever I feel like I need its utility, but until then it’s going to be basic I guess.

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Yikes! Check out those “headlight” eyes on my doggie!

It’s funny how I find myself gravitating towards 1971 again and again now that I’m sewing more from the decade. Perhaps it’s because of my love for the decade of the 1960’s, so please don’t tire of this trend on my blog. I see most of what our culture thinks of as the “60’s” as noticeably happening between 1967 and 1971, before this the earlier 60’s had more of a 50’s influence in my mind with random trends emerging from the popular music bands. The hippie looks and bell bottoms of the 70’s were obvious in style, fashion, and patterns after 1972.

Multi-use wear garments are my favorite pattern finds to make and therefore wear. They are something generally unavailable to buy “ready-to-wear”, and fun to make no matter how much wearing they get.  I’ve found that trying different styles, fashions, and garments has a higher success rate, lower monetary risk, and higher chance for personal partiality when you make it yourself, besides being so much easier, cheaper, and enjoyable.  It’s a win-win…teaching yourself something while ending up with something uniquely yours to wear!

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Tropical Wrap – a 1971 Summer Maxi Dress

Do you have one hour to spare? Do you have two yards of beautifully draping, summer-worthy fabric? Most sewers will answer yes. Well, here’s a year 1971 Super Jiffy maxi dress pattern that I found will fulfill a sewing ‘need’ for an uncomplicated project and look effortlessly amazing in – yes – one hour with two yards of fabric.

100_5935a-compTHE FACTS:

FABRIC: a 100% rayon challis

NOTIONS: I always have black thread on hand, and the inner closure ties were from my scrap bag of ribbons, so no notions were bought. The ribbons are so pretty and such a perfect match color-wise, it’s a shame they don’ get seen.

Simplicity 9415 combo back and front-compSimplicity 1100 reprint coverPATTERN: My pattern is an original, Simplicity #9415, year 1971, but this has also been reprinted this year (2015) as Simplicity #1100

TIME TO COMPLETE: One hour on the afternoon of July 21, 2015

THE INSIDES: The center back seam is covered in bias tape, but all the other seams are the hemmed edges all the way around, which are turned up in tiny ¼ allowances.100_5974-comp

TOTAL COST: Two yards of this tropical print challis was bought on clearance at Hancock Fabrics store for about $5 or $6 in total.

My hubby actually seems to find it hard to believe that front start to finish, as in “laying out the fabric and placing the pattern on it” to “ironed and wearing it on myself”, took me only one hour…but it’s true! After all I’m not nicknamed “Seam Racer” for nothing! Now I know every seamstress may not have the ability to be as speedy with her skills and that’s perfectly fine. However, even if this dress doesn’t exactly take you one hour, it will not take you much longer than that, I would imagine. It is a “Super Jiffy” pattern, and it really is incredibly simple, fast to assemble, nicely fitting, comfortable to wear, and (most importantly) flattering. This is the first Jiffy pattern out of the many I have met from either the 60’s or 70’s with which I am completely happy with and can file no complaints. That’s saying something!

100_5946-compThe best part about making this 1971 wrap dress is that in the time it could take you to go to the store, try on and find that perfect dress, then fork out the dough for it, you can decide to sew your own for less money and in less time. The motivation for making my wrap dress was a night out with my hubby – my little guy was babysat, and I had a new dress for that night by the time the dress was done. I do love challenging and complicated sewing projects, but an instant satisfaction project is always nice too, and I think everyone will agree.Butterick 4526 yr 1995 swimsuits and sarong wrap&1971 halter wrap sundress ad in directional fabric

I’ll bet the short version is really cute and fun, but I wanted something elegant and –hey- since I had the fabric for it…might as well. Maxi dresses cost more at the stores, and a little extra fabric on discount is no big deal generally. I would like to try a short dress from this pattern out of a wild, possibly border print fabric (like in the old 1971 magazine print at far right) or even a terry cloth for a swimsuit cover-up (like the 1995 pattern at left which looks very similar in design). Next year perhaps…

As you can see on the pattern cover, there is only one large piece needed to make to maxi wrap dress. The straight edge on the side that dips down is put along the fold, making the U-back. Despite being put on the fold, the instructions said to cut this back center, and it really is necessary since it does have some curvy shaping. However, I did make a very slight modification to the pattern. I merely put the bottom half of the center back seam on the fold, and cut the top half out as a regular seam. Thus I only had to sew halfway down, kind of like a dart, before finishing the edges. This center back seam is the only real seam to the dress, beside the duo of darts which are sewn into the front/side at the waistline. One of these front/side darts has the inner waist tie attached to it so that your wrap stays decently closed. I find the inner waist ties help me find and define where the waist is exactly as I am putting my dress on myself.

100_5951a-compWhat is the most time-consuming part to the dress is definitely hemming the long edges not just on the bottom, but all the way around everywhere else, too. I can do good straight stitching rather quickly so this part was a breeze for me, but a word of warning…the back U curve was rather tricky and took some snipping or stretching to hem it without warping the bias.

Looking at the sizing chart on the back, I should have technically made a small, but the pattern I had was a medium and I figured correctly that perfect fitting is not that important with a wrap dress like this one. I am glad I actually went a size up because it gives me slightly more coverage around the body. The wrap portion from the waist down is not as fully generous with the overlap of the two layers as most wrap dresses I have made before. If you have not made a wrap garment, let me briefly explain – the further the right edge of the wrap overlaps from the edge of the inner left wrap, the less “flashing” open you will have. The skinnier the skirt portion of a wrap dress or skirt, the more opening up you will have, also. This wrap dress has both – a smaller overlap of the wrap and a very slim skirt portion, but together they are the sexy design feature to this 1971 maxi dress. I really don’t mind the way the dress opens up. I feel it keeps it from being too overwhelmingly long, as well as making for a very elegant appearance when you walk the way it flows open and swirls around the body at each forward step. The way the skirt opens up highlights one’s legs and also shoes, which makes me happy because I’m proud of the comfy, vintage, ‘Hush Puppy’ brand heeled sandals I like to pair with my dress.

100_5939a-compThe wrap neckline actually does not have to be tied as the pattern shows, in other words laid oppositely on each side of the neck and tied behind the neck. I experimented and found that the neck straps can be tied into a knot before going around the neck (as I did for this 1930’s style dress), twisted and tied around under the arms for a strapless look, or even twisted together to go over only one shoulder and (with assistance) pinned down to the lower back. Even though these other neck-tying methods are totally possible, it does make the bottom skirt portion of the dress open up even more than normally. I solved this flashing problem with the skirt (when the neckties are wrapped differently) can be solved by closing the wrap with a pin or brooch to the side, just a waist tie/belt, or both together, as I wore on my own dress.

100_5959a-comp-comboMy being cold-sensitive necessitates a sweater for most indoor places when the weather is toasty outside. Air-conditioners normally make a room seem like an ice-box to me in most restaurants. In my opinion, this ’71 wrap dress doesn’t work well with many sweaters and jackets because of the neckline bulk…one sole drawback.100_5947-comp

For a basic but elegant warm weather garment – quick to make as it is to wear – give Simplicity’s 1971 Super Jiffy wrap dress a try if you have a chance to nab an original or a multi-sized re-print. Then break it out and be prepared to have a new dress almost before you know it. Instant and low-cost garments can be made by you much better than anything a store has to offer – vintage patterns have some killer styles that need to be worn and deserve to be seen more often! Do you have a favorite “super-quick” and low-fabric needy pattern which amazed you recently?

I recognize that it is now officially the season of fall where I live, and so I will be doing more postings for the chilly weather. However, I know that other parts of the world are just gearing up for their warm season, and so I plan on mixing a little of summer here and there in between the coming several months to brighten up my winter and give other readers ideas for their season.