“On The Sunny Side” – a Casual, Lace-Collared 1920’s Dress and Re-fashioned Cloche Hat

“It will help us every day, it will brighten all the way, if we keep on the sunny side of life.”  So goes the chorus from the song popularized in 1928 by the famous Carter family, but the song is also known for being in the year 2000 movie “O Brother, Where Art Thou?”  This song, the movie, and the general time frame of both have inspired me to make a bright and daily-life type of summer 1920’s dress together with a hat re-worked into a 20’s cloche.  There isn’t anything like a great outfit that you love to be in to help brighten up a disposition and add to a great day.

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A vintage tractor show in a small town only a day’s trip away was the catalyst behind my creation.  The occasion was a dusty, farm-centered, old-timey day of laid-back enjoyment which completely reminded me of something out of the depression-era dust bowl, the general setting of the movie, “O Brother, Where Art Thou?”  I don’t know what was brighter that day…my dress or the summer sun.

B6140THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  100% rayon challis in a bright coral with a vintage cotton collar

PATTERN:  Butterick # 6140, year 2004

NOTIONS:  I had all the thread and bias tape needed, but I had to go out and buy the blue ribbon the day before my dress was worn.  The collar is from my stash, as was the hat ribbon and button (which was from hubby’s Grandmother).

100_5735-compTHE INSIDES:  French seamed

TIME TO COMPLETE:  The dress took me about 8 hours, and was finished the day before the event, July 18, 2015.

TOTAL COST:  maybe $15

I had been sitting on the idea for this dress for a while but when we decided at the last minute to go to the vintage tractor show, it gave me the reason to whip this up from off of my sewing table.  I am glad I had a reason to wear it because it seemed harder in the thought process than it was to actually make it.  This is the cutest loose fitting sack dress I could have ever imagined.  My dress being from the 1920’s is (I suppose) the only way to reconcile mentally my wearing something so generous.  My cloche hat doesn’t do much for the sun but is a good match for what I believe is a decently historically accurate 1920’s ensemble.

The-Artist-Costume and drawing by Mark BridgesMy preliminary inspiration was from a Hollywood source –Bérénice Bejo’s character Peppy Miller in the 2011 movie “The Artist”.  Our first sight of her in the movie is when she is wearing a jacket over a dress very similar to the one I made.  The movie dress, however, has long sleeves with a sleeveless vest/jacket, but to make my outfit versatile, my dress is sleeveless and a long sleeve jacket will be sewn later.  I even tracked down a costume sketch so I could see all the original colors which I stuck to as well in my version.  Part of the reason for the use of odd colors on the movie dress was so that things would show up a certain way in grey toned colorless film.  Nevertheless, the early/mid 1920’s into the 30’s are classic for pairing and using bright and unusual colors (reflective of the positive outlook of the times, see this as one example), so as wild as a bright salmon peach and royal blue sound, there is a high probability they were matched.  Honesty, I love the finished look.

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To start with, I used my easy, two-piece, fall-back basic Butterick for my 20’s shift silhouette.  It has been used with great success already for two other 20’s era creations – a blouse and a satin dress.  This time, I had to do some detailed adjusting of the neckline so it would suit my chosen lace collar.  I also opted for the easy and quick bias facing for the neck and arm hole finishing as the rayon is a bit sheer.  A deep hem was made so as to weigh down the dress a bit. 100_5737a-comp

With the dress done in a jiffy, I figured out how I wanted the center front skirt insert to be pleated and made a draft from plain paper – a box pleat in the middle and plain knife pleats on each side.  Then I made the real version of the pleated skirt insert and top stitched it down before cutting away the dress fabric behind.  This process reminded me of opening up a window.  That was all!  With only some quick hand tacking of the add-ons, my dress was done in the blink of an eye.  Many mid and late 20’s dresses have similar center front skirt interest which adds room to move.

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My parents (on occasion) pick up vintage items they know I don’t have but are uniquely special, such as collars and unique notions, with the occasional accessory.  Making this dress gave me my first occasion to use my now substantial lace collar collection, all found by my parents.  I believe this particular collar that I used is not too old, but I really don’t have any idea besides I think it’s hand crocheted.  It is so lovely the way it has such detail and I love the pointed dip in the center back.

Adding a lace collar made me rather seriously reluctant for the first time…I felt like I was doing vintage quaintness overload.  Now I mostly sew and wear vintage, and wearing the 20’s styles is obviously from the past so I really shouldn’t care.  However, out of all the trends that have made a resurgence, lace collars have not strongly come back and in my mind I’ve always seen them as too cute to handle on anything other than little girl clothes or a civil war era dress.  However, I did feel like this dress needed that collar, and if ever I was going to try and wear one…this was it.  Somehow, I think the plainness of shape and bright color to the dress saves the collar from becoming what I so feared.  Whatever it is, I do like it and already have plans for my other lace collars.  I’ll be like the anti-trend setter…

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The neckline ribbon is merely pinned in place with a safety pin because I really don’t think modern satin ribbons wash well…and I don’t want to try just to find out.  After having the rest of my dress be vintage appropriate materials (rayon and cotton), I regret having a poly satin ribbon, but I have limited resources and my dream materials might have to stay that way.  The ribbon does have a nice dull shine and it does give my dress the right amount of cheery fun.

100_5720-compMy hat is my first attempt at re-fashioning head wear.  I don’t think it’s too shabby.  My methods were primarily sewing and folding rather than soaking, re-blocking and shaping.  It was a cheap basic shaped hat originally, similar to the hat I used for this re-fashion.  My problems with this hat are purely on account of me – 20’s hats are so darn close fitting and my hair gets so frizzy on hot, humid days that there is no room to hide all my locks!  I can get away with this somewhat with winter cloches because the wool sticks to my hair, but this straw one does not.  Besides, I need my glasses to see and for some reason this hat interferes with my eyewear.  However, my hat is a success and fills in a niche by completing my 20’s wardrobe for summer.

I did not cut into the hat at all but folded in the back brim into the crown.  The sides are folded like tacos and covered up by the ribbon.  Everything is invisibly hand tacked own by clear filament thread.  Eventually, I might like to rip all this apart and do a better job (because I can) but it would be easier (and more fun) to probably just make a new hat.

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Technically, I believe the tractors behind me in most of our pictures are not really my dress’ era but probably 40’s or 50’s.  They did have some breathtaking 1910 to 1915 still working steam powered tractors for some historical awesomeness.  Although my hat is breathable straw, standing next to piping hot steam engines running in the height of summer was a bit overwhelming, but without the cloche my outfit suddenly had a 30’s aura.

100_5699-compWatching those old machines still working makes me realize how the times before ‘The Depression’ had such a swaggering confidence.  1920’s ingenuity is often overlooked because it is so far back and different than our modern technological advancements but most of what we take for advantage has its roots in the 20’s – television, synthetic fabrics, traffic signals, sunglasses, refrigerators, washing machines, and frozen food, to name just a handful.

The 1920’s definitely has a sunny side…

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Assembling a 1920’s Tux Ensemble: Part 1 – Buttoned Spats

Having more 20s themed parties and events to attend, together with a great vintage find of an old tuxedo jacket and pants, has entailed my working towards putting together everything necessary to historically suit up my hubby like a “white tie” gentleman from the Jazz Age.

This post is “part 1” of what will more than likely be a total of three, maybe four, total increments to reach a complete 1920’s Tuxedo ensemble.  The other parts will be the shirt (and collar), vest, and a cummerbund or even a bow tie.  For now, I’m starting from the bottom up, with turn-of-the-century gentleman’s shoe spats.  The spats I made for him turned out wonderful, look great, a fit very well.  They were also fun and unusual to make.  I love trying new things!

100_3681a     It is a bit unfortunate that vintage menswear is so scarce.  Thus, I’ve been turning to old and reproduction patterns as of late to clothe my hubby in something to match my own eras of vintage and historic clothing.  However, even vintage and reproduction men’s patterns are not as plentiful as the choices for women, so I was extremely happy to find such a wide selection of historically authentic patterns for men through the company Reconstructing History.  This company is a great resource, not just for patterns, but also for ideas and through historical information.

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  white cotton mid-weight twill (one yard was more than enough)RC 1900s gentleman's spats

NOTIONS:  two packs of big ball “La Mode” buttons were the only notion bought; the elastics and thread and bias tape were already on hand.

PATTERN:  Reconstructing History 1007, the downloadable version

TIME TO COMPLETE:  The spats were very easy and quick coming together, they just took me a bit longer to sew because of the machine I was working on.  I wanted to enjoy myself, get to know the sewing machine…more about this later.  The spats were made by me in a total of 5 or 6 hours ( a few evenings worth of a little time), and finished on August 7, 2014.

THE INSIDES:  All seams are clean, mostly hidden, and oh-so-professional looking!

TOTAL COST:  around $5.00

I picked out the Reconstructing History downloadable 1900s gentleman’s spats pattern to make for my hubby.  The downloadable option is great because not only do you save money, but most of all, you get your pattern almost immediately…no wait!  The downloadable option was perfect because I needed the spats done for a party in less than two weeks.  You simply print out the pages, then connect and tape the pages together for the full pattern, similar to Burda Style patterns (see my post here).  Their pattern pieces included the seam allowance, and thus can either be traced out onto something else, or cut straight out of the paper.  Being a relatively small pattern I just used the paper version.  Any changes will just go on a paper note with the spats pattern so I can remember what I did for the next time these are made for hubby. This way if I need to make the spats for anyone else I haven’t changed the pattern itself.

100_3673     The spats pattern is only three simple pieces, with each getting cut out a total of four times if you are lining the spats, and twice each if your spats are not lined.  Personally I would completely recommend lining the spats for a very nicely finished item that is sturdy and not droopy.  A heavier duty fabric also seems to work well for spats as well.

All three of the fabric pieces get sewn together in one, two-seamed, continuous semi-rectangle.  Thus, if you are lining the spats, you end up having four fabric pieces.  As my hubby’s ankles are a bit skinny, I had to do a small adjustment on all four fabric pieces before connecting the front and lining together.  I sewed in a tapering seam of about 1/4 to 1/2 inch from the center front corner seam over the calf to the top of the spats.  Then, with wrong sides out, two of the spats semi-rectangles get sewn together at a time.  I stitched all along three of the spats sides (right side, left side, and the top) and next turned right sides out.  The raw edged bottom got white single fold bias tape sewn on and turned under.  The entire sides and the two seams where the three pieces connected were top-stitched down through all layers.

100_3656     Everything up until now, had been sewn on my “new” birthday present – a late 1930’s Sears Kenmore Rotary sewing machine in impeccable condition, and in a beautiful table/cabinet as well!  It was really fun to get a closer feel for how they did things back in the past, even though there is a decade of difference between the spats and the Kenmore.  I can’t wait to sew more on this gem.  My parents sure know in a good way what will make my special day…I was very surprised and tickled (especially with the giant bag of attachments and thread, some of them silk)!

I went back to my heavy-duty, early 80s standby Singer sewing machine to make my own elastic loop closure strips for the edges of hubby’s spats.  I didn’t want to do that many tiny button holes on the spats and make it hard for hubby to get them on himself.   The pattern itself suggests elastic, and, besides, elastic was starting to become more prevalent in the 20s.  Cutting small sections of cord elastic of about 1 1/2 inches, and marking equalized spaces out on a strip on double fold bias tape, I hand sewed my own “loop tape” to go along the sides of the spats.  Hand sewing the “loop tape” was hard on my hands, but, with a thimble and some good music on for help, it actually went faster than I expected and the finished result was well worth the effort.  I used my heavy duty Singer machine to sew on the “loop tape” along the very edge of the two spats’ left sides.  Then I matched up the spots where the loops are on the spats’ right sides and sewed on buttons in their corresponding places.

100_3449     Last but not least came the strap that goes under the foot in front of the heel.  The Reconstructing History pattern called for elastic and I used some small 1/4 in non-roll white elastic from my stash for the underfoot strap.  After paging through my old reprints catalogs from the 1920’s and 1910’s, I suppose a true historical feature for these spats would have been to have the underfoot strap be more like a belt, with a tiny buckle to loosen and tighten the fit.  However, I knew the strap would more than likely get quite dirty and take much more time that I didn’t have (not to mention where to find such a tiny buckle), so I opted for the easy “elastic” way.  Hubby put the spats on so I could mark (while they were on him) where to sew the elastic underfoot straps on and how long to make them for a perfect fit.

I am excited to see how the rest of the accessories for hubby’s tux look with these spats.  The cotton twill of the spats are a wonderful match with the mid-weight grooved gabardine he picked out for the main body of his vest.  Think of the actor Jean Dujardin in the movie “The Artist”; that will be my idea of hubby in his finished tux ensemble.  He’ll be a “Dapper Dan” man!

Transformational Knitwear: My “Modern” 1920’s Shawl Collared Dress

One of the milestones to fashion history came when the much loved knitwear came into being. I tried to channel the innovative qualities of both knitwear and the 20’s style in this project.  A resale store purchase of a RTW dress, with a ‘big box’ store label, was transformed into a new vintage style dress reflecting the height 1920’s fashion.

100_2544     Thanks to two great personalities – Coco Chanel and Jean Patou – the populace were able to enjoy the freedom and comfort of knit fabric at an earlier date in history than many people realize.  In 1916, Chanel was using jersey in her hugely influential suits for women, thereby popularizing the feminine association with knits.  However, in 1919, French fashion designer Jean Patou, had come back from 4 years of fighting in WWI (The Great War) and re-opened his couture studio.  He soon became known  for designing what we know as sportswear, and is considered the inventor of the knitted swimwear and the tennis skirt. He also was the first designer to popularize the cardigan, besides being known for his cubist-inspired, color-blocked knits.  Jean Patou did wonders to move fashions towards the natural and comfortable, accommodating for the healthy and athletic lifestyle which was the “new” ideal for women starting with the ditching of constrictive corsets in the 20’s.  Coco Chanel is quoted as once famously saying, “I want women to eat and laugh without fear of fainting,” and knitwear for the newly independent and working women helped achieve Chanel’s desire all the way into our modern times.

ParisFrocks1930-12,Bertha collar refashion     I have found conflicting reports as to the proper titles that were used for the type of collar made for my black 20’s dress.  Technically, I believe this collar style should be called the “shawl” or “capelet” collar.  Nevertheless, I have found a few old original reprinted patterns, such as Past Patterns’ #2425 or Vintage Vogue #2535, and old prints from sewing books which refer to shawl collars as “Bertha” collars (such as the left picture drawing from a 1930 Butterick Delineator book; link here).  Whatever the real ‘official’ title for this type of collar is, it seemed to be used very widely throughout the 20’s and 30’s. Most shawl or capelet collars were recommended to be made out of soft, drape-friendly chiffon-like fabrics. I will explain below how I made my collar work with my knit fabric. By the way, I’m sticking with the shawl collar name..just because 😉

THE FACTS:

HISTORICAL FORTNIGHTLY CHALLENGE:  Innovation

100_2141FABRIC:  The main body of my shawl collar dress started out as an Old Navy item bought at a resale store (see the original dress in the picture at left).  The Old Navy dress is a Modal (rayon type) knit with a small percent of polyester, and is sort of thin but very soft with a brushed feel.  The fabric I bought (for the add-ons to re-fashion my dress) is a cotton/rayon knit with a small percent of spandex included.  The spandex made this knit less than favorable for a historical dress, but it was the best match color wise and similar to the knit of the Old Navy dress.  The shoulder bow is a rayon knit and comes from a top that was bought at Target (on clearance) about 10 years ago.  The bow was taken off of the top and has been in my “bone yard of extra stuff “for a decade, waiting for the right project to finally come along!

PATTERNS:  1) the Bertha/shawl collar came from view B of Vogue 8907, year 2013;  2) the longer second skirt that went under the Old Navy dress’ skirt came from Simplicity 2614, view A, year 2009;  3) the long sleeves came from an OOP Vintage Vogue #2354, view B, year 1999. 

V8907 frontSimplicity26142354vogue

NOTIONS:  The only thing I bought to make my dress was one skein of “Snow” colored cross stitch floss to decorate the shawl collar.  Black thread was the only other notion I used, and I always have plenty of that on hand.

TIME TO COMPLETE:  This dress took me about 10 to 12 hours from beginning to end.  I was finished on November 12, 2013

THE INSIDES:  the original dress I re-fashioned had serged seams, which I left as is, except for the sleeves, of course.  Everything I sewed was done in French seams or self-covered.

TOTAL COST:  I spent only $4.00 for the original Old Navy dress, and around $20.00 for the fabric to refashion it, but with only 30 cents for the skin of cross stitch floss, I figure on a total of about $25.00.

HOW HISTORICALLY ACCURATE IS IT?  Quite accurate in everything except the small percent of polyester, spandex, and Modal in the knits.  Polyester has roots in the 1929 writings of Wallace Carothers, but it and spandex weren’t actually around ’til the 50’s.  See The Dreamstress’ post on “Rayon and other manufactured naturals” for an explanation on Modal and rayon’s historical stories.  Otherwise, the dropped waist of my dress is very classic of the 20’s, as are the new skinny sleeves I sewed and added.  The double skirt can also be found in some 20’s patterns and posters, while the shawl collar’s accuracy has already been proved.  

100_2539     My first step towards making my 20’s dress was to cut off the too tight short sleeves and sew in my new long sleeves.  I used my Vintage Vogue 2354 mainly on account of the skinny sleeve look, but also because of my intent to sew up this 1947 dress soon for an event, and I wanted to experiment and see how they would fit.  As they turned out, the VV2354 sleeves fit me great, but they are SO skinny!  The part around the wrist barely stretched over the free arm of my sewing machine.  I made a paper note to keep with the pattern, so when I make my VV2354 out of my satin, I will remember to hem the sleeve cuffs before I sew the sleeve length together.

Next, I sewed the front and the back the two skirt pieces together for t100_2536he under skirt I was adding.  The skirt of Simplicity 2614 is cut on the bias and has a beautiful gentle flare which complimented well with the skirt on the original dress.  The second under skirt was added to help prevent any see-through issues, to add length, and to give my re-fashioned dress extra authenticity and character.  The original pattern had to actually be shortened about 5 inches since I wanted the dress to be knee-length and, remember, the waistband is at the hips.  As you can see, my dress stays at that ‘borderline-to-shocking’ length for the late 20’s – short enough to show the knees at times but also long enough to cover them too.

The skirt was hemmed, the top folded in onto the ‘good’ side, and pinned then sewed to100_2569 the inside top of the hip waistband (see right picture).  My skirt addition does wonders for the dress’ hip waistband; it is now much more sturdy and it doesn’t roll or bunch up like it did without the second skirt underneath.  You bet I’m wearing my handmade 1920’s tap pants underneath!  It’s the perfect opportunity to go all out vintage in and out.

100_2127     The shawl collar was the 3rd part of my re-fashion.  The pattern I was basing my shawl collar on actually reminds me of “Superman”. It is the type of shawl which starts on the left shoulder, drapes across above bust length in the front, but comes all the way down the back and gets sewn under to the back bottom hem.  This design had to be adapted and re-drawn.  I began by pinning together the small shoulder shaping pleat on the right side of the collar pattern.  Next, I folded the collar pattern in half at the shoulders so I could trace the shape of the front collar onto the back half (see picture at left).  Technically I made the back just a little lower hanging than the front, but I did dip the center front down lower to make sure it would cover the open neck of the dress.  Besides re-drawing the pattern I further adapted it by double layering the shawl collar.  The instruction sheet merely says to do one layer and make a tiny hem on the edge, which sounds great for a chiffon or something lightweight.  However,  I knew one layer of my knit would make a flimsy collar, nor did I want: 1) a raw edge hem too be that obvious, 2) a collar which would stick to my dress or blow in my face.  So I cut out two collar pieces (which were quite large), sewed the front pleats and the left shoulder seams (the only shoulder seam), and sewed the collar pieces with right sides together along the outside edge.  Now the collar could be turned right sides out and there was a clean seam along the outside edge, ready to be top stitched, and later hand decorated.  The collar’s inner neckline edge was then pinned together, as well as under, so it could get sewn down to the dress finally.

I realized I needed to draft something to fill in the low, plunging U neckline on the original 100_2558adress (finished inside picture at left).  I had been waiting to do this step until the collar was done so I could measure everything and get as exact as possible.  I put the dress on, then placed the collar over myself, pinning at the shoulders.  The back of the collar seemed to match up exactly with the back neckline of the dress.  For the front, I measured the difference from the collar neckline down to the dress neckline and traced out the scoop neckline shape on the collar with white chalk.  After both items were off of me, I got out paper, stuck it inside the neckline of the dress as it was all laid out nicely on the floor, and began to trace out a filler neckline.  When I was done with my drawing, I compared it to the shape that was chalked out on the front collar, made some minor adjustments, and added seam allowances before it was cut out.  Once I had the fabric cut out in the shape of my neck filler, I turned the edges in, towards the right side, since I lapped the neckline line piece under the original neckline.  With the neckline ready, I turned in the neck edge of the shawl collar, and sort of lapped the neck and collar together in a stable double seam.

100_2538100_2564     My stitching along the edge was a fun and relaxing thing I got done one Saturday afternoon.  (See close-up at left) Every so often I do decorative hand-stitching techniques, and I feel I did quite a good job here doing even widths and choosing the right stitch.  The bow, all ready sewn in it’s shape, added a perfect last touch.  It is sewn down just on the front side of the left shoulder seam.  The old McCall 5313 envelope cover picture at far left shows a bow finishing off a sheer shawl collared dress.  One of my favorite movies, “Manhattan Tower”, from 1932, has the secretary character Mary wearing a large scarf bow on her left shoulder, too.  See it for yourself, here, at about the 5:30 time counter, then go ahead and watch the whole movie yourself at some point – it’s quite interesting.  ManhattanTower1932-mccall pattern combo

Originally, my main inspiration and idea for making this dress came from and outfit worn by the character Peppy Miller from the 2012 movie “The Artist”.  Peppy wears two different types of shawl/cape collar dresses in the movie, but the one that inspired my sewing can be seen in the combo of movie still/costume drawing at right.  Her dress was worn towards the movie’s beginning, the day after she makes headlines, and she is getting off a trolley car to try for a job as a movie extra.  Looking closely at the movie dress, I began to see a few ways to make my interpretation closer to historically authentic.  This is the second “The Artist” movie inspired dress I have made recently, the first can be seen here.  I plan on making two more dresses from the movie as well.

leaving trolley combo  In honor of “The Artist”, we still HAD to take our photo shoot at an old trolley car in front of our town’s History Museum.

I’d like to put a few captions to the pictures below.

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“Did I lose something back there? I think I’m clear of the trolley door. Tell me ’cause I can’t see…my bum sticks out in this dress, doesn’t it?”

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Hubby caught me doing a ‘Peppy Miller’ dance when he snapped this one.

Both pictures, while fun, also show how nicely my shawl collar lays.  Hubby seems to think the collar, together with everything about the dress, has a modern, fashion forward look.  All I know is I love wearing my dress!  It’s incredibly comfy, fun, and I feel like it has a classiness that isn’t trying too hard.  20’s meets modern in so many ways with this new dress of mine.   Talk about getting a “leg up” on fashion.

I have to let you go…I need to catch this trolley.  However, the ‘trolley car’ of innovations in the world of fashion never stops and always keeps rolling on, changing what we wear and how we wear it.  At the same time, when I make something like this 20’s shawl collar re-fashioned dress, I tend to think that some things just never change.

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The Tap Dancing, Scalloped Collar Dress from “The Artist” Movie

Out of all the Silver Screen look-alikes I have made yet, none have been as rewarding to see finished, as fun to wear, or as tiresome to make as my newest Hollywood imitation: a dress from the movie “The Artist”.  This dress is also one my best fitting creations, amongst my modern and vintage sewing alike.  I simply can’t help but break out and dance like Peppy in this dress, especially since I now have a good excuse to wear my tap shoes!

100_1980a     Peppy Miller, played by the actress Berenice Bejo, is the one of the main characters in the 2012 movie “The Artist”.  It is a silent (music only) film in black and white.  The movie spans the years of 1927 to 1931, and, as IMDb sums it up, “The Artist” is about how “a silent movie star meets a young dancer, but the arrival of talking pictures sends their careers in opposite directions”.  My dress, which I carefully copied in many details, is seen in a tap dance scene towards the end of the movie, thus it might be more of a 1931/1932 era outfit.  For being a rather small production film coming from an independent/private company, “The Artist” won 5 Oscars and numerous other awards, especially the Academy Award for Best Costume Design.

Peppy sure is a natural when dancing with George Valentin ( played by Jean Dujardin) and together they make me smile as well as desire to learn some of their tap moves!  Here’s a original shot from the movie to show you where my inspiration has come from for my dress.

the-artist21     Well what do you think?

100_1982bTHE FACTS: 

FABRIC:  a linen-look fabric, half polyester and half rayon, in a bight turquoise color – I bought 2 5/8 yards at Hancock Fabrics

NOTIONS:  I bought from Hancock Fabrics 15 yards of a flat, stiff, white trim, called ‘President Braid’, 3/16 inch width;  I also bought a zipper and a spool of matching thread

PATTERN:  as the base for my ‘Artist’ dress, I used a mix of 3 patterns: Simplicity 3827, year 2007, view B, for most of the dress;  Simplicity 4365, year 2005, view B, for the godets added into the bottom dress seams;  Simplicity 3092, year 1949, view 1, for the scalloped collar.  I drew my own pattern for the white trim design…I’ll explain more about this down lower.

TIME TO COMPLETE:  I spent at least 25 hours (counting sewing only time) to complete my dress, all worth it in the end.

THE INSIDES:  fairly nice…all seams are clean finished or flat felled, except for the side seams and the inside edge of the neckline.  Those two seams are double zig zagged along the edge because those spots needed to move and stretch a bit.

FIRST WORN:  to this photo shoot then over to my parents’ house to show this off!

TOTAL COST:  just under $30

The main body of the dress was made using the Simplicity3827 because it had theSimplicity3827 dresses exact under bust shaping, six paneled skirt, and neckline as the movie dress.  Only one change was made – the hem of the shorter dress was lengthened just a few inches to land upper mid-calf on myself.  I must say, this is a wonderful pattern!  It is designed very well, the sizing is right on, and the fitting is oh so comfy.  I especially like how clean and non-bulky were the small armhole facings (for the sleeveless option).  Also, my side zip in this dress turned out so well it’s nearly invisible.  I already have plans to make the longer length, 3/4 sleeve version of this pattern in another fabric from my stash.Simplicity4365 godet skirts

I chose the godet pattern piece for view B from Simplicity 4365 (in picture at left) because this piece was longer and not as wide as the godet for D, E, and F skirts.  Paying close attention to the design of Peppy’s dress, the godet points on my dress end/start right at the spot where the leg bends at the hip.  Several inches had to be taken off the bottom of the godets for them to hit at this point in the seams and even up with the dress hem.  Four godet pieces were cut: 2 for the front and two for the back.  After doing a few of these type of godet pattern pieces, such as for my recent “Water for Elephants” 1931 dress, I feel those tricky points are done quite well, especially the inside (see pic below right).100_2019

The collars were by far the most tedious and slow specialty work I have done yet to date.  Adding the trim to the collars got old really quickly, mostly because I had to be so exact but also because it was hard to see any progress made to the dress…I just wanted it done!  I should clarify why I’m using the plural ‘collars’.  It’s because I had to make three full sized collars, with trim sewn on, to decorate the neckline of my ‘Artist’ dress.  Thinking outside the box has again produced great results for my sewing.100_1985Simplicity3092 blouses fm 1949     My decorative collar is based on a pattern from an old original 1949 Simplicity 3092, click here to see the Wiki page of this pattern.  The one scalloped collar piece of View 1 is supposed to go around the whole neck, but that same pattern piece is the exact length from the center back of my ‘Artist’ dress to the center front of its V-neck.  So I took the collar pattern from Simplicity 3092 and copied it to have a paper version that I could draw and score and mark up all I wanted.  I felt like an engineer drawing out the design for the collar scallops – first I traced out the grid of some graph paper onto regular paper, then used a compass to have even arcs and even spaces between the arcs.  For my design drawings to fit in curves of the collar, I had to enlarge my scalloped design on a copier to 135% bigger.  Now I was able to trace my scalloped design directly onto my copied pattern piece of the collar, making sure to keep the design from going over the seam allowances.

See the picture below to get an idea of what I did to a basic collar.

100_2044     All the tiny triangular shaped clippings leftover from shaping the scalloped collar edge are all saved, kept in a clean baby food container, and I hope to make my own lace with them.  The current edition of Threads magazine #169 has a tutorial on how to make your own lace using fabric scraps, thread, and wash away stabilizer.  I love to find creative ways to use leftovers from other projects!

100_1952     My mind ruminated over several different ways to add the scalloped design to the collar, but anything that involved hand-stitching was gladly eliminated, and, as it turns out, the president braid I used worked great…I hope it washes well too!  I used my sewing machine to add the white braid trim and held the pieces in place with extra long pins while I worked. EACH collar took me FOUR HOURS of work, from the cutting to all the trim sewn on.  Believe it or not, each collar also used up 3 5/8 yards of trim.  I could only sew on the collar in 1 1/2 hour intervals – it was all that my shoulders, hands, and patience could stand in one dose.100_1961

The center front fan is simply one of the three collars, for which I folded the scallops together and sewed from behind to pinch out the excess plain fabric.  It was hard and frustrating to sew from the wrong side, along the trim, but not catch the trim.

The center of the scalloped fan is covered with a rounded end casing to cover up any messiness and give me a nice flat center spot to sew the front buttons down.  After trying my scalloped fan on my ‘Artist’ dress, I ultimately decided to cut the extra end trim off (you can see my cutting line of chalk in the picture) and shorten it so it wouldn’t be so overwhelming and cover up the front bodice as much.  By the way, the buttons I used are small, with a pearlized textured top – these were fished from my stash by hubby, and are most probably vintage originals.

I did hit a bit of a problem after doing the trim on two collars.  I ran out of white braid!  I called all over and no one was helpful over the phone, so I went out myself, and found some more to finish.  Whew!

100_2017     My long right and left collars were sewn down to the neckline just at/below the dress’ facing, with the white braid ends tucked under so there are no raw edges showing.  I couldn’t really pick a color to use for top-stitching down the collar, so I used clear filament thread…nearly invisible and so non-historical, but don’t tell anybody because it worked out great anyway.    The collars matched together perfectly in the front as well as the back, as you can see from my picture.  I’m showing off my tap shoes in this picture!

100_1981     We had the perfect era-worthy backdrop for the photo shoot of my ‘Artist’ dress.  The Deco designed tiled wall you see in the background is only a number of blocks away from where we live, and it is covered in decorative work from top to bottom -so pretty!  The entrance wall in our pictures is by far the best part of the building, I think.  I wish new buildings were made this beautiful but I guess that’s what makes these old buildings special.

I really enjoy my ‘Artist’ imitation dress – it’s a very different 30’s style.  This project was one of the few that totally surprised both me and hubby because we really couldn’t see it coming together until it was together.  Then we realized what I did.  I feel so good about this dress that I have everything on hand to make at least two more imitation outfits of Peppy from “The Artist” movie.  Keep on the lookout for them to appear in my blog this winter.The_Artist_photo_Peter_Lovino_copyright_WarnerBros2

Peppy Miller is a character with an amazing, happy personality, and I tried to convey some of this in our pictures of my movie dress.  Perhaps I was feeling in character a bit too well, and we got quite a number a great shots with a little too much spunk on my part.  If you would like to see more pictures of this dress visit my Flickr page (click here for link).  Just believe me, I really wasn’t up to too much, even if I look full of it…

If you haven’t seen the movie “The Artist” for yourself, please do; if you’ve seen it already I hope you enjoyed it and recognize my dress.

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