Kelly’s “Pandemic Princess” Collection

Last year of 2020 we were all challenged, tested, and pushed to find our personal courage, kindness, bravery, compassion, perseverance, and joy of life.  It was a crazy year which would have been wild enough even if it was in the pages of a fairytale book.  Some of my home isolation’s survival practices included sewing myself some wearable fantasy dresses inspired by all the classic Disney princesses.  They were something which helped to transport me to a happy place both in the wearing and making of them.  They also gave my sewing a purpose to my limited free time when everything seemed worthless to make except face masks and pajamas.  I’m pleased to announce my “Pandemic Princess” blog series collection!

That bit of fantasy which we love in our childhood movies, those films which provide contented dreams of castles in the sky and happy endings, can become buried in our consciousness as we get older to the point of becoming a mere nostalgia.  Yet, this year forced me to think outside of the box and rediscover simple, basic, everyday means of fun, play, and creating pleasant memories to counteract all of the disappointing, gloomy happenings around us.  It is funny how the necessity of becoming wrapped up in the drudgery of “adulting” too often can sap the sense of innocent exuberance from one’s life.  So, I thought, why leave the giddy appeal of the classic Disney animated princess movies to just the younger set?  My sewing capabilities give me the ability to interpret all that I loved about those fantastical ladies of royalty into my life today, so why not act on such a revitalizing idea when I am stuck at home, sewing too much necessary and overly basic items?!

I can now swish around in elegance, content in my happy place.  Each princess outfit is so wonderful, like wearing a dose of dopamine, especially with all the crowns I have to match, too (definitely worth it).  I started this whole idea off with a “Beauty and the Beast” inspired dress in the late summer of 2019 as a gift to myself for my birthday, matching by happenstance with a dozen red roses I received as a present.  Continuing on the series took me the course of March 2020 up until now (beginning of 2021) accomplish.  There are a “baker’s dozen” (13) to this series, so you see why one or two princess projects are month would take me so long!  The planning and details to each has been so energizing and satisfying to see finalized!  

These are not costumes but outfits I intend to wear just the same as the rest of my wardrobe…only with an extra bit of energizing inspiration behind them.  I primarily worked off of my existing fabric and notions stash on hand for some pandemic practicality.  Some outfits, more than others, are very floofy and for “special occasions” that we no longer have in the current times – so these are for swishing around in a park, picking up food at a drive-through service, or other such events I choose to turn into something fancy.  Other outfits are more casual but super sneaky, and have their princess inspiration low-key. 

To interpret them for today according to my vintage tastes, I looked at making these princess dresses through a specific understandings.  First of all, let’s face it…many of the leading ladies’ stories are problematic, and have issues.  I’ll be the first to admit it, now that I am giving them an overview as an adult.  No wonder children are the whole-hearted, unquestioning, adoring crowd of such films!  Yet, growing up associating myself with and relating to Belle and Jasmine and Ariel, this fresh awareness of mine does not detract from my long-standing fascination for these fairytale ladies.  To reconcile the fashion, the characterizations, and means of interpretations that each Disney princess film has all together, I almost exclusively looked at them in relation to the year that their movies were released.  Each Disney animated film was very much a product of its times. 

Thus, for some examples, my version of a Tiana inspired dress will be a 1930s call-back style from the 2000’s era.  My Aurora outfit will be a 1959 classic with princess-inspired details, and my Snow White interpretation will come from a 1937 pattern.  All of these and more are tied to their movies’ release date.  I have made just a few exceptions to this ‘rule’.  Generally, though, each outfits’ origins are as unique as the princesses themselves.  Sometimes I looked at the cultural origins of the story to understand the story and the fashions, as I did for the movie “Tangled”.  Sometimes I connected the personality of a heroine to another similar character of the time, such as I did for the “sort-of princess” Megara.  I better see why Jasmine was portrayed as a spunky, rebellious teen when I think of the cultural trends and the pop icons of circa 1992, and so I wove in this outlook.  

For each interpretation, I went with my gut, remembered what I connect to for each character, and chose an outfit what would seem natural, so as to have the maximum chance of being worn.  Again, these are not costumes!  The last thing I wanted to do was take all my time on many Halloween-only outfits that I want to wear any other day of the year but can’t, realistically.  Also, I know that if I do not listen to my particular tastes, my personal style, and cater to my individual body type, I run a high chance of ending up with a project I hate.  My wardrobe items can only stay if they hit my happy place.  These princess inspired pieces find that bright spot at a higher level than most. I have also found a new and special appreciation for 90’s fashion along the way to realizing how (deep down) the fashion preferences of my childhood haven’t really changed over the years. 

I am so in love with each and every one of the items this self-appointed mission of mine happened to produce to the point that I am honestly freaking out over sharing them because each project is so special to me.  Thus, please realize this series is a very important part of me rediscovering my childhood dreams.  It also showcases an important part of some of what pulled me through this past tough year.  So, I am asking anyone who views my outfits, and loves them just as much as I do, please respect my creativity to come up with this in the first place, and my time and passion to even make, photograph, and write about them at all.  Please do not copy me by mimicking the design and fabric combinations to these outfits I have done.

If I have inspired you and you want in on the fun of it all, I ask for proper credit, which is only the right thing to do in the first place.  In today’s world where our social world is full of other people’s ideas and creativity, imitation might be said to be flattery – but consider that it also can be stealing.  It also harms one’s own uniqueness.  Someone else’s true inspiration or perfect style is undoubtly going to be different than mine, as it should be, so don’t take the risk of hurting someone else by ignoring yourself.  As Herman Melville said, “It is better to fail in originality than to succeed in imitation.”

Yet, I know I am not the only one who naturally has reached out to the princess ideal for an uplifting of spirits in 2020.  The viral “it” dress of the year was Lirika Matoshi’s $490 “Strawberry dress”, as reported by the New York Post, Vogue, the New York Times, Glamour, NBC, and L’Officiel (and seen on the backs of celebrities such as Tess Holiday, who donned it at the ‘20 Grammy’s, or Harry Styles).  It is a frothy confection that combines a dreamy sequined tulle fit for a princess with the popular cottage core trend.  Then, Lirika Matoshi followed up on that success late in 2020 with their own princess collection in collaboration with Disney inspired by Cinderella.  Disney bounding doesn’t have to revolve around whether or not one is capable of actually showing up at a theme park.  It relies on the ability to dream, and the appreciation of a bit of fantasy as well as the sense of a happy escape which provides a safe place.  This dreadful year brought on a need for such an ability that children have down to an art in the best of times!

At 5 years old, already winning awards for the princess outfits my mom made for me!

Just like us, each one of the princesses in Disney’s classic animated movies were challenged, tested, and pushed to find their personal courage, kindness, bravery, compassion, perseverance, and joy of life.  I can commiserate with the elation of freedom from isolation when watching Anna from “Frozen” or Rapuzel from “Tangled”.  I can marvel at the kindness and long-suffering of Cinderella, the positivity of Tiana, the hopefulness of Aurora.  I can understand the cynicism of Megara, the struggles of Elsa, the determination of Ariel.  Are you ready for some crown wearing?  Are you prepared for a grown-up girl who is seriously not done with her make-believe dress up time?

Golden Maple

There is nothing quite as refreshing as a change of scenery.  I love the fact that the holidays change up the atmosphere as well as the sights around town, and yet a full out location modification, if only for a day here and there, is the real elixir.  We’ve been taking advantage of the acres of land (a road trip away) which my husband’s family still owns.  It is the remnants of what was once a much larger farm, already old when the third generation back bought it.  The promise of no one around but us and plenty of personal space with a variety of exciting nature to hear, see, and absorb was wonderful. 

Of course, I couldn’t help but try out wearing my newest vintage dress creation for one of this season’s trips out to the farmland.  Not that I did the actual property hiking or upkeep work in this (I save that for boots, a worn-in shirt, and denim overalls). Nevertheless, this dress interpreted the colors and feel of the farm to me – rustic, beautiful, fun, and freeing!  The old family property is our new safe place to be ourselves, reset, and find renewed refreshment.  Similarly, this new dress is a cozy, cheerful, and easy on the eyes.  This is already a cold weather favorite piece to wear!

THE FACTS:

FABRIC:  Lady McElroy Textured Jersey Knit Fabric, in “Golden Gentle Harmonie” print, in polyester from Minerva Crafts and Fabric

PATTERN:  Simplicity 5850, year 1973, from my pattern stash

NOTIONS:  All I needed was matching thread and a 22” long back zipper

TIME TO COMPLETE:  The dress took me only 5 hours to go from start to finish.  It was completed on October 22, 2020.

TOTAL COST:  about $25

The background color is very interestingly unique and hard to capture accurately.  It is not really a yellow, but neither is it an orange.  Minerva’s listing seems to call it a gold, but it more coppery than that.    The closest I can swatch it through the Pantone colors is “Autumn Maple” #17-1145.  The dress’ color reminds me of a heavily spiced pumpkin pie, or baked sweet potatoes – yum! 

For being a 70’s dress, I see this a step above the stereotype of the era.  It is has an elegance of silhouette inspired by the 30s and simple lines that could be from any of the past several decades.  The angled empire waistline is so lovely!  There are your run-of-the-mill tapered sleeves…no bell sleeves, and no puff sleeves. The back has a long 22 inch zipper making this super simple to get on for an instant put-together look.  The skirt has a lovely swish to it between the bit of bias cut and stretch of the knit.  As easy to sew as it was, I don’t know why it wasn’t one of those minimal piece designs called “Jiffy” patterns.  After all, I was able to pull off cutting out this dress on only 2 yards of material (60 inch width).  If a dress like this comes together as quickly as this did in one evening, then I am a very happy girl indeed!

The ‘turtleneck’ is not as overpowering as or even similar to a 90’s turtleneck – the back envelope summary technically labels it as a stand-up collar.  This high neck can be found as an added option on many dress patterns from the late 60’s to the mid-70’s.  It really is the perfect balance that keeps my neck warm but not suffocated.  The instructions did not call for interfacing or even facing to any part of the dress, and as I was working with a knit I was happy to oblige.  Unfortunately though, the pattern wanted only one layer for the stand-up collar with a simple hem along the top edge.  What?!  I went ahead and cut out two layers of material to face each other for a clean finish and stronger collar piece.  This slight change of mine made for a much nicer neckline.

What is this trademarked “Look Slimmer” label to this pattern, I wonder?  I understand it’s self-explanatory yet I am curious why Simplicity began this line in the first place and what body type was their intended audience.  If anything, such a selling point sure helped me feel more confident about using a large print floral for a longer length dress.  Surely a design that slims the body must be able to pull off an oversized print, right?  Longer length, long sleeved, warmer winter dresses always make me sense that I may lose a complimentary body conscious appearance in the effort to stay warm in the cold.  I sometimes felt as bulky as the “Stay-Puft” man (from the original ’84 Ghostbusters movie) in the winter clothes I had growing up.  Yet, this dress manages to hide the layers I am wearing underneath here…amazing!

Paging through the rest of my 70’s pattern stash, I now realized I do have a few more of these “Look Slimmer” designs.  They do all rather seem way too similar to each other so I can’t imagine a gal back when these came out buying too many patterns from this line unless she was okay with not a lot of variety.  Nevertheless, that is a great promise to include on a pattern cover and I do believe it holds rather true even in a print such as the one I chose, even with a few extra clothes layered underneath.  When you are out in the middle of almost nowhere away from home, letting yourself grow cold is unwise and not fun at all.  If I can look good taking care of such practicality, even when no one but family sees me, all the better.

I hope my fellow Americans had a happy, healthy, and hearty Thanksgiving holiday celebration.  Who is already begun getting ready for the next holiday?  We did chop down a cedar tree at the farm land, mostly to refurbish our coat closet for protection against clothes moths.  Yet, we also posted up in our living room the small little top portion of the tree leftover.  As we never have a tree up before Thanksgiving, we did not decorate it, but still…I guess, unofficially, Christmas has already started early here, too.  

Domestic Alterations

There has been a really cool challenge just my kind of thing going on this month through Mia who blogs over at “Sew North” called “Alter It August” (read the full post here).  The summary of the challenge is to “examine your wardrobe and bring life and love to unworn garments”, aka, those that do not “spark joy”.  However, I agree with Mia – why perpetuate the “give it away, buy new, give it away, do it all again” vicious circle when you can fix up what you have until it does pass the Marie Kondo test?!  This is my mini montage post of some of my most recent refashions in honor of “Alter It August”.

These are all pretty basic refashions, made using garments that are everyday essentials of today – a blue pinpoint oxford, a nightgown, and a denim skirt.  These are all things that have been in our wardrobe for two decades now.  Yeah, perhaps I should be embarrassed how long we keep what we have, but we don’t buy a whole lot except what is necessary.  We are content enough to be happy with what we have as long as it is in good condition and working order.  However, I am very sensible about my “yet-to-refashion” stash, never wanting to reach “hoarder” status and wanting to keep it down to only a few drawers worth of items, and constantly weeding out what no longer fits or is too worn from our wardrobe.  All three of these pieces needed to go due to such reasons.  Yet, I see our unwanted items as equal to having fabric on hand, exciting ingredients in the recipe for a new project.  So, if it’s on its way out the door and I have the right idea with some free time, under the sewing machine it goes!

Firstly, I’ll start with my more polished refashion of the three I will be featuring.  This one has been a long time coming.  You see, I have been wanting a blouse made of pinpoint oxford blue shirting for the last few years.  I just never could figure out what weight and tone of blue I wanted so I kept putting off ordering any material!  Good things come to those who wait, I suppose, because my hubby’s standby shirt finally had the collar too filthy to clean with a rip in the sleeve and worn through cuffs.  What a dirty, messy boy!  It was mine now.

The collar was cut out into a simple round neck and the sleeves taken out.  Then the front side chest pocket unpicked off as well as the buttons removed.  It was being stripped!  I used a tight buttonhole stitch to close up the buttonholes and make new ones on the right side to make it a female right-over-left closing.  The same buttons were sewn on the closed buttonholes and when my blouse is on you’d never know the better.  His shirt was a slim fit style but I still brought the side seam in a bit and re-cut the armscye to put the new loose cut-sleeves in, albeit shorter sleeves now.  I used what was left from shortening the hem to make a skinny casing to cleanly bind the neckline and reposition down the front pocket.

I didn’t really want the refashioned blouse to look the same as any women’s oxford you can buy with very masculine features.  All the men’s-inspired women’s oxfords I have tried on before are stiff and uncomfortable, always wrinkling up my body, and too stiff and proper.  I wanted this one to be softer and unique.  So I took the most liberty with the sleeves.  I played around with several tweaks to the hem until I found what I liked.  I made a handful of ¼ pin tucks up for a few inches to lightly puff the sleeves out and add interest and shaping, like a mock cuff.  I might have seen something like this as inspiration, but I don’t remember where or if I did, so perhaps it was all my idea, so I’d like to think.  This was pretty much just what I wanted without having a specific idea for the sleeves – something subtly standout that adds yet doesn’t distract.

My new sleeves did not fit very well after all was done – they pulled at the underarms.  So I unpicked and added in a self-drafted underarm gusset.  That was the perfect fix for a loose fit that grazes over my body and stays relaxed in wearing ease.  Happily my self-drafted gussets turned out so much better than when I have to use a pattern.  The mid-weight cotton-poly blend was really easy to work with, too, so that helped.  Gussets are so hard to capture in a photograph!  An armpit picture is rarely graceful.

The best refashions happen when I don’t force ideas but let what comes naturally into my head be translated through my sewing.  It might not be the most complimentary thing I have made but I love it.  This blouse is comfy and all my own design – no pattern!  It is finally the blue pin point oxford I have always wanted with no cost on my part and one less item saved from the garbage!

My second project to be featured is something that will not be seen out of the inner household sphere.  Two nightgowns that were now too small and no longer interesting for me were turned into one quaintly freshened up little dress for bedtime.  I really liked the prints of both of the two and I had a housecoat to match the polka dot one so they were worth saving to me.  The main issue was the too small bust and shoulders on both.

The tank polka dot one was too short for my taste so it was designated to be the add-on to the floral print one.  I cut off the short little cap sleeves on the floral one and then cut several inches down into the side seam to open up the bust.  Those old sleeves were used to re-draft new ones off of the tank nightgown, based on both the measurements of the new armscye and this stray vintage pattern sleeve I had on hand.  My new sleeves disguise the fact that the sleeve is too far into my shoulder and they are generous enough to fill in for where the old ones failed…besides being so cute!  The self-faced, fold-over style also saved me from having to do a hem!

Okay, so the fit was saved on the nightgown. Next was the challenge of figuring out what to do with the extra polka dot knit.  I cut a total of four rectangle strips out of the leftovers and sewed them into one long continuous strip to make a giant ruffle for adding on the hem!  The fun contrast of the two prints and the quaint frill along the hem makes this real treat because it is something I would not try for my real dresses and blouses.  That doesn’t mean I don’t enjoy it, though, because I secretly have a crush on the “shabby chic” aesthetic.  There’s nothing better than having your home clothes for relaxing being something which automatically cheers you up and makes you smile…exactly what my new refashioned nightgown does for me!

This last item to be featured is nothing special to look at, and very hard to see the real change my refashion causes.  However, this simple denim skirt had the most memories attached to it compared to most of what I do refashion.  I think I’ve had this skirt since I was about 13, and it was a go-to piece for my teen years.  It is a “Cherokee” brand (anyone else remember how great this Target brand was?) heavy cotton denim, and is still in awesome shape for the amount of wearings and washings it has seen.

However, the larger size of my current “mom hips” have prevented me from being able to even button it closed for the last few years.  I missed wearing it.  Thus this refashion was nothing special, just something to adjust the fit and keep the appearance of it basically the same so I could feel like I had a mere updated version of my old standby item to still wear

Anyways, all I did was I cut off just over 8 inches the hem, and used that to add in a center back panel.  What was a maxi length skirt was basically only turned into a knee length skirt and widened.  The add-in strip was tapered in at and just below the waist for a better fit and a fit-and-flare shape, since this was a very straight and skinny skirt originally.  The little bit of the button placket I had on the hem panel blended in perfectly with the existing waistband.  When the center belt loop was sewn back on, I was very happy with how well the alteration is not noticeable.  The raw edges were serged (overlocked) inside for a clean finish and top-stitched down in matching golden denim thread to further match with the rest of the skirt.

We all know getting rid of something connected with memories is hard, but with a refashion of a treasured piece of clothing, it’s the best kind of letting go. It’s like moving on and owning your life, past and present.  Don’t get me wrong – it’s not about trying to keep my stuff forever.  I’m always conscious not to stockpile things…we don’t keep what we cannot use.  There’s no room for that in a small house and life is better without being bogged down by “things”.  However, if you can make something you will use, do want, or even need from things that are already on hand, well how cool is that?!  Something for nothing is good in my book.  Besides, the current statistics of the percent of waste we are making is astounding, as well as the numbers counting up how much clothing is wasted and unwanted.  At this rate we’ll ruin the earth just for our buying habits…hey, we’ve already got a head start in that, sadly!

I do not think fashion needs to be as consumptive and impactful a commodity as it is today, and I’m trying to do my little part to be a sensible solution within our little household sphere.  Keeping up such wardrobe recycling practices, I’ll get around eventually to reaching my dream of a fully handmade closet!

Liebster Blog Award

This is long overdue, but I would like to say that I am honored to have been nominated (as of June 2018) for the Leibster Blog Award at The Quintessential Clothes Pen! Thank you, Quinn!

What is the Liebster Award?
The Liebster Award is an award that exists only on the internet and has been given to bloggers by other bloggers for near 10 years now. Liebster in German means sweetest, kindest, nicest, dearest, beloved, lovely, kind, pleasant, valued, cute, endearing, and welcome. You can find more information on the history of the Liebster Award here at The Global Aussie blog.

This award has the following rules:
• Answer the questions asked by the person who nominated you
• Nominate up to 11 blogs (more than 2, though) that you feel would enjoy blogging about this award the award who have less than 200 followers.
• Ask 5 questions of the bloggers you nominate

Now to answer the questions for me to answer –

How did you start making historical garments?

Some of the first books I read which got me hooked on history!

It all began when my interest in history began. I had already been sewing basic, modern garments for myself for a few years by the time I reached 10, the age I started reading vintage kids’ history books. That might sound boring to many, but if you’ve ever read a “Childhood of Famous Americans Series” book, or one of the many “Landmark” books, or a “We Were There”, “North Star” (in picture at left) or a novel by the great G.A. Henty, you will understand my enthusiasm. As one who formally only received “social studies”, I was enamored by a different, rounded, and exciting way of understanding our past and needed a tactile way to interpret it. Cue a pre-teen me finding out that there is such a thing as re-enactments…and naturally wanting to dress the historical part for each of them! Hand-made garments from re-enactment attendees who we got to know helped me get outfits to start with. As I have found out more facts over the years, I have supplemented the historical garments with my own pieces over the years by sewing them myself!

What is your favorite part of blogging?

My favorite part of blogging is a tough one to answer. For me, it’s using writing to bleed emotionally from the inside…releasing my inner energy and desire to share…freeing my brain from all those thoughts and ideas I can’t keep in…reaching out to others like-minded from the comforts of my home. Blogging makes a bigger, better me. It has improved my writing skills (I do enjoy putting ‘pen’ to ‘paper’ so much), and gives me a purpose to research, which my inquisitive mind loves. It is an outlet that is good for me, and I hope does the same for others who read my little site. The people I have met through my blogging are the best! So, I suppose my answer is multi-faceted.

The 1850s original hand-tinted print that hangs next to my bed

Describe a time you struggled with a historical project. What did you learn from the experience?

The American Civil War era is a longtime and current struggle! It has been about 20 years in the making now. My mom’s cousin had been a very dedicated Civil War re-enactor, even raising and keeping horses for “his cavalry troop”. Seeing their re-enacted horse cavalry charge back when I was 14 had me so completely sold on dressing for that time period. I bought a hoop skirt as a late teen, then in my 20’s I chose all the patterns I would need and their fabrics, as well as beginning the cutting out of my dress. Well, fast forward to the last 5 years when I have ordered my corset making kit, bought repro ready-to-wear bloomers and a corset cover, and made myself a chemise (at left). Still nothing is wearable together *sigh*. I just can’t get a good feel on what exactly was worn then and how to fit it. I blame it on my inability as a historian to understand the Civil War in the way that I have a hard time keeping the battles straight in my head. But really – I know I need that corset at this point and am totally hung up and freaked out over the thought of making it. As frustrating as it is, I have grand hopes still for finishing it yet, though, so all is not lost, I know! I think if I had a place and a reason to wear it – there isn’t an 1860s re-enacting group around anymore – I might have better motivation to finish.

If money and restoration were no object, what piece of historical technology would you love to try using?

…some of the medieval and renaissance engineering tools from all over the world. People back then were incredibly talented with the limited technologies they had but excelled in finding ways to set the sky as the limit! That being said, I think I would much rather watch historical technology being used by experts than try it myself. I would love to see the building of the soaring cathedrals of Europe, or witness an illuminated manuscript being drawn and painted, or experience the configuring by intelligent minds to read the stars and calculate the calendar, for just a few examples!

Do you watch or listen to anything while you sew? If so, what is your favorite background?

That varies. Most of the time, sewing puts me in some sort of ‘zone’. Sometimes I want to be laser focused on a technique (such as welt pockets), or would rather not have anything influence my mood, or even just desire to be able to listen to what else is going on around me. It’s then that I like peace and quiet. However, most of the time I like to choose my own good background noise. Very rarely is that noise a podcast because I like really info rich ones (especially from Dressed) and like to focus on the words to let the info really soak into my comprehension. Thus, mostly I choose music – and not music that makes me want to get up and move my body since I haven’t found a way yet to both dance and sew! My background noise is a hodgepodge – sometimes it’s a television show I like to hear but am not sucked into enough to watch dedicatedly (such as Friends or Double Dare…). Most recently, my medieval studies have given me reason to listen to 13th to 16th century music, which I can do while I sew. Yay for research and seamstress work all-in-one! Otherwise, I listen to various genres of all kinds – cultural, movie soundtracks, old-style country, classic crooners, soul singers, and selective modern pop such as Maroon 5, Avril Lavigne, The Weekend, or Bruno Mars. Lately, though, I’ve been catching up on the 80’s and 90’s music. Yet, I’m always okay with a little Daft Punk anytime…it always picks me up even when a project is frustrating!

Now for the blogs I nominate!

Emily at “Incurably Kitsch”
Kristen at “Verity Vintage Studio”
Elena at “Vintage Sewing Machines”
Aimee at “Aimee’s Victorian Armoire”
Helena at “Gray All Day”
Anne at “Pretty Grievances”
Jennie at “The Ugly Dame”
Colette at “Colette’s Sewing & Stuff”
Dixie at “DixieDIY”
Esther at “Dolly Creates”

…and the questions for them to answer!

What is your favorite decade for fashion?
How long does it take you (on average) to sew the things you make?
What is your everyday style like?
Do you watch or listen to anything while you sew? If so, what is your favorite background?
Would you rather wear stripes or a plaid? A solid or a floral?

Many people believe the Liebster award is similar to a chain email/letter, and it does share similarities but the underlining idea is to help promote each others’ blogs and discovering amazing creatives who might not be as mainstream or easy to find as other more popular sewing sites.  However, I do believe the amount of followers should not be a grade for the worth of a blog site, which is where this award comes in!  One good turn deserves another so I hope you go check out my list of awardees and follow them if you don’t already, and another word of thanks out to Quinn at “The Quintessential Clothes Pen” for nominating me in the first place.  I’m just shy of my 7th year anniversary of blogging here!